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Well 40 shipped is the special pricing till may 14th Orings are 2 bucks but being u have a 14 your oring will be reusable unless u just want one as there not stocked at a local parts house these are 5 dollars till the 14th
 

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Well the motor is more than warm enough to burn that off, it's not like you run dead on 170 degrees with it, I've got 160 units also but I don't recommend them
 

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If this is true, I have to wonder, with the oil in fuel issues and the blow by, valve coking, etc, if it needs to run at the temp it does stock, or close to it? One of the best recommendations I see for fuel in oil is to get it warm enough to burn it off.

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There are pros and cons for both sides of that coin. The higher temps from the factory t-stat will help the engine warm up faster which has some benefits, especially if normally only driven for short trips. Outside of that you have multiple factors -

On short trips especially the engine oil and various components do not necessarily reach the desirable (or uniform) temperature. Coolant circulates the through the block,heads and turbos to remove heat. Oil is circulated internally to lubricate. The engine oil will heat faster by coming in contact with hotter metals it travels through. Then you address whether it is too hot.

Engine oil operates at its own temperatures and has a most effective point (based on the oil you are using). As oil gets hotter it gets thinner. Fuel dilution thins it out more. Too thin and you lose the protective qualities of the oil and could suffer damage. Both the 2.7 and 3.5 I have are equipped with oil coolers from the factory.

Valve coking is long known to be an issue with engines and eventually was corrected with the chemicals in fuel and intake flow patterns. As the EcoBoost operates on a direct injection platform you no longer have the fuels traveling through the intake and over the valve stem into the cylinder. If curing that issue were within my current knowledge set there are a number of engine manufacturers who would be knocking on my door.

Fuel in the oil is much the same thing. The Eco starts cold and runs RICH. Short trips affect the expansion and contraction of the metals in the engine, combined with running rich, to allow more fuel into the oil. Fuel is sprayed directly into the cylinder and what is not burned or evacuated through the exhaust becomes part of the oil on the cylinder walls which washed down into the pan.

As shown above, with the factory t-stat the guy was running just over 212 degrees. I have not seen which part of the country he was operating or exterior ambient temps, likely was not towing either. If you are running around down south or towing I could easily see it climbing above that 212. Also keep in mind two things 1) turbos are liquid cooled on these trucks and just because it is a 170 degree t-stat does not mean the engine operates at 170. If you start running it harder (passing?) or towing the engine temps will rise. With 87 octane you will be in a knock situation and the OAR will pull timing (and power). Just as there is a point it is too cold for thermal efficiency the same applies to being too hot.

I would have to go back and look at current product specs but last I knew Subaru was running 170 degree t-stats from the factory in their cars.
 

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I know you can't get it all.....but what negative effect might this have on the cabin heater in the dead of winter?

For reference, I live in St Louis. We spend a couple months each year in single-digit temps. My truck lives on the street, so fast cabin warm-ups are important to me.
 

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I know you can't get it all.....but what negative effect might this have on the cabin heater in the dead of winter?

For reference, I live in St Louis. We spend a couple months each year in single-digit temps. My truck lives on the street, so fast cabin warm-ups are important to me.
It comes down to they will heat the same until the 170 t-stat reaches 170 degrees. Then heater core has coolant at a minimum of 170 degrees for one versus 188 for the other. Overall duct temps will be slightly lower and as a result it would likely take a little longer to uniformly heat the entire cab. I'll see if I can locate a CFM rate for the HVAC to figure out the time.
 

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I'm still not sure I can wrap my brain around how the motor reaches a lower maximum operating temp after it levels off just because you open the spigot a little sooner. I know a few have posted evidence that they believe proves it does, but how? Seems to me if the motor runs long enough it will level off the same. Open the thermostat at 188 it still climbs to am equilibrium of about 205. Why would that equilibrium point be any different with the same cooling equipment just because you open the flow of water sooner?

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I'm still not sure I can wrap my brain around how the motor reaches a lower maximum operating temp after it levels off just because you open the spigot a little sooner. I know a few have posted evidence that they believe proves it does, but how? Seems to me if the motor runs long enough it will level off the same. Open the thermostat at 188 it still climbs to am equilibrium of about 205. Why would that equilibrium point be any different with the same cooling equipment just because you open the flow of water sooner?

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Heat transfer. When the thermostat does not open until 188 degrees then the engine block, heads, coolant lines, etc are going to have that as the MINIMUM temperature before the fluid runs to the radiator for cooling. When the "spigot" opens sooner then the heat is not transferred and held in the various engine components. Instead it is allowed to be carried out at a temperature 18 degrees lower. Which means the block, heads, turbos, intake, etc are all a slightly lower temperature. This is also where you are preventing the possible engine damaging detonation and pulling the timing. The block and heads are cooler so there is less chance of detonation in the higher cylinder temperatures.

You would only have an instance of equilibrium if the exterior temps or radiator and water pump could not flow enough coolant resulting in the coolant remaining a constant temperature - say 205 degrees. Put your beer in the refrigerator at 38 degrees and leave it - the can and beer inside will be 38 degrees. Put it in a refrigerator at 45 degrees and it will not reach 38 degrees. It will only get to 45.
 

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This guy is dead on good info, also just for the record 188 degree thermostat is not fully open till after 200 degrees don't know the exact figure but on the 170 units it looks to be fully open by 184 degrees, there fore it carries the heat out sooner, these things flat work I've got plenty of reviews on Facebook also these warm up just as quick as the bypass we use is identical to the stock one, we just don't reach the 200 plus degree mark these have a 1 year warrenty and a money back gurantee if it don't do as I say they do the only time mine has reached the 210 degree fan temp is idling without the a/c on and soon as I hit the road it's cooled right off, operating temp is controlled by the thermostat as I said before the only way the thermostat would not help temps is if the radiator is under sized and was aready maxed out but that's clearly not the case here, on my 05 5.4 with a Whipple I run my 170 degree unit and it has a 3 core fluid dyne radiator my coolant temps while pulling 184-186 unless it's like 95-100 degrees out then it will muster low 190 pulling a 37 foot travel trailor, if u guys are ready I'll be happy to send a PayPal invoice, there is 3 days left on the special, u can also message me directly or call 9106039440

Robert
 
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