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This is what happens when I'm bored and caught up (more or less). Much less interesting than the engine pics above!!

A few back ordered parts remain and I am ready for shipment!

I was 3/4s of the way through compounding and polishing the hood, bumper, and front fenders this weekend and my polisher took a dump :mad: so I didn't get to the coating stage. Just bare, clean, 99% perfect, vulnerable paint. I've wanted to upgrade for a while but now's not the best time.

Anybody out there... rotary vs long throw random orbital?
15 mm long throw for the home user.
 
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I've noticed you around offering detailing insights, was hoping you'd stop through, thank you. Why 15mm over 21? My current is only an 8mm throw. Deciding between rotary to cut, then finish with the short throw. Or med/ long throw since they should cut plenty already. I like to 1-step for friends, family, coworkers, etc. and 15 or 21 would probably be best for that. But want to get near flawless for my own vehicles.
Both have their place in the world and if you were a detailing guy doing this day in and day out you oughta have both. ;) I see this scenario where you have a cart setup and both machines loaded and ready to rock at a whim. This said, I feel that a 15 will do anything a 21 will do and will get into areas that a 21 just won’t go. The larger throw machines are awesome on large flat surfaces but they show their short comings in tight areas and when you get a little topography on a panel and tend to stall a bit easier on a concave curve. I hardly ever stall a 15 and going from an 8 to a 15 will make you feel like you’ve stepped into a new century and I believe you will be amazed at how a R/O can cut when using one of these. It’s simply not a fair comparison putting a long throw machnine next to an 8mm.

Most of the 15’s and 21’s made by the same manufacturer use the same motor in both machines so it isn’t like you gain more power by having a 21. Now if you’re covering a lot of area the 21 will finish the panel first. You mentioned you already have an 8 mm. I think a 15 is the perfect next step and more than most people will need. Let’s face it you can polish a vehicle with an 8mm, it simply takes longer either long throw will reduce working time significantly. If you get a 15 you can turn your smaller machine into a dedicated tight area machine by buying a 3” backing plate and a few smaller pads and then have you’re 15 mm ready at the waiting with a 5” backing plate and 5.5” inch pads.

I have a number of different polishers and have my re-tasked my previously “go to” machines, I use a Griot’s 8 mm machine now as my dedicated tight area polisher. I use a Porter Cable 7424 as a dedicated carpet/upholstery polisher, it was my first dual action machine and it runs as well now as it did over 15 years ago. I have a couple of rotaries DeWalt and Flex, they are both great machines but I’ve hardly touched either since these since long throw polishers came out.

I learned how to polish using a rotary as a kid but seldom use one these days. Now if my friend wants his boat polished and I’m cutting gelcoat, I’d use a rotary but I’d probably still finish up using a R/O machine. R/O’s make polishing a no brainer and most people find they’re easier to finish up without worrying about holograms.

There are plenty of decent machines to choose from. If you are looking for a machine that will last you a lifetime and can spend a little more than an entry level machine take a look at Griot’s Boss or a Rupes 2nd Gen. These guys both make awesome machines in both 15 and 21 profiles. People argue back and forth on which of these 2 machines is better, the Rupes is probably slightly smoother (I can’t feel it), the Griot’s has a better end user warranty and I feel slightly more powerful. Best of luck.
 

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I used a rotary once about 25 years ago and created maybe on the clear coat. Are you indicating the throw style prevents this? Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
A rotary in the hands of a master can produce a beautiful finish. In the hands of those less proficient (the average guy), more often than not you will see what is referred to as holograms as an end result, it’s like seeing ghost swirls in the paint for lack of a better description.

A random orbital (RO) or dual action (DA), these are the same thing, because of the the random path the pad follows does not leave or leaves significantly less “circular” swirls or holograms. The pad is not going in a circle so to speak. Mastering a dual action polisher takes much less time and practice than a rotary. Some/most users are never able to leave a completely swirl free finish using a rotary.

The last step products (LSP) of yesteryear, often waxes, almost all contained heavy concentrations of fillers. The fillers did exactly what you would expect them to do. They fill the swirls or micro-marring left in the finish following a paint correction or more commonly wash induced swirls. Let’s face it, most owners will go to the trouble of waxing or sealing a vehicle but won’t go to the trouble of polishing their vehicle for that over the top appearance. This is the perfect environment for an LSP with fillers. The end result of such vehicle maintenance is that the finish looks great for a couple to a few weeks but will always wear, evaporate or dispipate, leaving the swirls that were always there showing once again. It gradually slips back to it’s real self. Don’t get me wrong many products still contain fillers and for many owners these definitely have their place as a perfect solution for their circumstance. A perfect finish is a bit like chasing the rabbit through the briars, pun intended.

Perfect paint just can’t live on a daily driver. Most people that take their detailing seriously these days and that actually drive their vehicle know that they’re going to remove about 85-90% of the defects and then apply an LSP. This level of correction leaves a finish that is completely acceptable for most with the exceptions being; the most discriminating detailer or for the vehicle that is heading straight to the car show. Fortunately today, we have LSP’s that are much harder and last much longer than the beauty waxes of days gone by and yes, I still love the look of a great wax properly applied. I’m a realist and I know a great wax won’t last long and that’s certainly not a problem if you’re putting on a fresh coat every month or so. It’s also true that even the best real waxes have a tough time living in hot climates, real waxes melt. Consequently most “waxes” now contain or are mostly synthetic ingredients.

A good RO machine in the hands of a user that has 5 - 10 hours of practice can easily move their paint into this 85-90% range. I believe it’s important to understand that this level is a good place for your paint to be. We aren’t doing our clear coats any favors by pulling out the polisher 4 times a year. There is only so much paint to go around and yeah it isn’t that hard to make clear coat go away. It probably just sounds like a lazy old man saying this but I’m to the point where I seldom polish my entire vehicle. I always start with a full chemical and mechanical decontamination, full polish and LSP when I get a new vehicle. From there on out and for the most part, I spot polish as is needed to keep the finish up and do my darnedest to keep from instilling swirls in my paint when washing. I firmly believe that washing technique is where great paint lives or dies and I sincerely believe it only takes a time or two through a brush style tunnel wash to do damage to a paint job that you simply may have to live with. Washing technique is a story for another thread but is really where all of this “detailing thing” starts. ;)

I’ll step off of the carsoap box now. I know that’s way more than you were looking for.
 

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Not that your asking and assuming you have a better than entry level polisher but I believe some of the available Marine Detailing products would improve the Gelcoat on top of that sleeper significantly. I’ve done some boats in the past that truly looked so far beyond saving and they turned out amazing.
 
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I hope you like it the way I like mine. It does a lot of work but still gets into moderately tight curves. I have several buffers but this is my go to machine. I do however run 5” pads.
 

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No, Snake has a deadline but it’s his deadline and it’s top secret
 
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I don't see anything overly alarming there. The porcelain on one plug appears to be cracked and the boot appears to have signs of arcing down in the plug well.

This said, though the carbon on those pistons isn't scary (I've seen way worse), it's a definite sign of being too rich. That can be anything from the tune to bad injectors.

Are you completely comfortable with your tune?
 
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