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Discussion Starter #1
I have a stock truck and is the factory filter bad ? Would a K&N filter be better help gas mileage than the stock one ? I’m not going to do anything else to the truck


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K&n does not filter as well as a paper filter. You will notice zero improvement in mileage and zero butt dyno improvement. The only improvement from a K&N will be accelerated wear on your motor due to it letting in the fine dust particles that the stock paper filter actually filters out.
 

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If your goal is mpg's, not sure you'll be happy.. But, if you want 14 hp more at 7000 rpms, go for it! :)

Good luck!

Mitch
 

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However, that video only applies to the G37. The F150 filter is much larger, with a totally different airbox design. Is the G37 somewhat starved for air at WOT, whereas the F150 isn't, using the stock filter?

Here's another video, done similarly, that claims 5hp and 3lb-ft, for a 90s F150:

5hp/3lb-ft are well within the margin of error.

And then you have the whole debate of filtration versus flow. You could remove the filter altogether and you'd get substantially better flow. But, I would be especially concerned about filtration with a turbocharged motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was going to wait till after the first oil change and dyno the truck just to see what hp it puts to the wheels. For less than 50.00 I can get a filter and see if it’s any power increase. You get 2 pulls on the dyno so I’ll know if I wasted another 50.00 or not


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Just remember, you can only test power... not filtration. Pull the filter entirely and the dyno will look even better! The engine just won't last very long.
 

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Check out the AEM dry drop-in filter. It filters great and has no oil to mess with sensors
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Watch this. I’m going to do this tomorrow if the shop calls me back they said that they was trying to tune a car now and if they got it they could do it tomorrow



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Check out the AEM dry drop-in filter. It filters great and has no oil to mess with sensors
x2 here i use AEM's in all our vehicles, back in '06 we where running 6.0's and we put K&N's in when the Ford Dealerships found them during a service he told me to get rid of them as Ford had "proof" K&N does not filter dust and will eventually ruin your motor, i personally don't know if it's true or not, but i don't like the idea of having to oil an air filter
 

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There is no benefit to a lower-restriction air filter on an ignition engine operating at anything less than full throttle.

Engine air is regulated by the restriction of the intake and air filter, plus the throttle plate. If limiting air by closing your throttle then you might as well let a superior air filter restrict a bit too. Your right foot will automatically adjust the throttle plate. The engine gets exactly the same amount of air either way.

Dyno runs are deceptive because they are conducted at full throttle. Does not reflect real world conditions.

I wouldn't put a K&N on any engine I did not hate and wish to kill. Have refused to purchase otherwise nice vehicles once I found a K&N air filter installed.
 

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To the OP, since you said you weren't going to mod the truck. Here's another way to look at this, from a cost / benefit perspective. Bear with me here with these assumptions, you'll see what I mean at the end. Let's say an OEM paper filter costs $10, an aftermarket filter like a K&N is $50, and the OEM filter gets changed every 25K miles. So based on these assumptions, the breakeven point between a paper OEM filter and a K&N is at the 125K mile mark. Anything after that, the K&N is more cost effective, since it can be cleaned and reused.

Just like oil and tire discussions, OEM versus aftermarket air filters are pretty much the same. I've owned numerous motorcycles over the years, and often replace the stock paper filters with something else. I used to use K&N pods, but now I use Uni dual-stage foam filters. Flow versus filtration is a perpetual comparison, like dino versus synthetic oil, BFGs versus Nittos, Coke versus Pepsi, etc. I had a Subaru SVX and VW Corrado that I used Uni foam filter pods on, and if I ever changed the intake on my F150 that used a cone filter, I'd slap a Uni on there too.

https://unifilter.com/online-catalog/clamp-on-air-filters/

Another thing that I've done with stock airboxes is made my own tray filters, and used the tacky Uni foam filter spray and massaged it into the new filters. I've used the blue Filtrete filter panels that you can buy at a home improvement store, cut them to fit the airbox, sprayed them down with the Uni stuff (it's tacky like chain lube, not oily like what a K&N uses), massaged it into the filter panels, then used paper towels to wipe up any excess. They've worked fine so far, haven't thrown any codes, and are easily replaced with the OEM paper filters for those trips to the dealer. If there's room in the filter box to double up on the Filtrete panels, I've done that too.

First pic below shows a Uni dual-layer pod filter in a 2000 GMC Sonoma I used to own, that had an LT1 / T56 swap done to it. The picture under that one shows the blue Filtrete panel in a 2017 Ford Fusion Sport (2.7 EB engine) that I traded in on my F150. I did the same thing to my F150, but there was room in the airbox to put two Filtrete panels, so that's what I did.
 

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Umm, yeah... if I found a vehicle with a piece of Filtrete installed for the air filter, I would run the other direction.
'Course I didn't leave it open like that, I put a "screen" on top of it, to keep it in place. Did this to my 2018 Fiat Spider Abarth, until I got a deal on an intake system that I couldn't pass up (it was free). Again, no codes (even with the piggyback ECM and GoPedal mods), no funny sounds or smells, ran fine.

First pic shows the stock airbox, second shows the screen on top of the Filtrete panel, third shows the intake system that replaced the stock airbox.
 

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To the OP, since you said you weren't going to mod the truck. Here's another way to look at this, from a cost / benefit perspective. Bear with me here with these assumptions, you'll see what I mean at the end. Let's say an OEM paper filter costs $10, an aftermarket filter like a K&N is $50, and the OEM filter gets changed every 25K miles. So based on these assumptions, the breakeven point between a paper OEM filter and a K&N is at the 125K mile mark. Anything after that, the K&N is more cost effective, since it can be cleaned and reused.
You are too kind. K&N cleaning kit is $15 and may clean 4 times if you don’t lose the kit over the years between uses. Plus 30 minutes labor to clean. Plus the filter has to dry before being reoiled before being reinstalled. So you start tonight and finish in the morning. But doesn’t the oil need time to set and get sticky before use?

i do not see an economic case for K&N.
 

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'Course I didn't leave it open like that, I put a "screen" on top of it, to keep it in place. Did this to my 2018 Fiat Spider Abarth, until I got a deal on an intake system that I couldn't pass up (it was free). Again, no codes (even with the piggyback ECM and GoPedal mods), no funny sounds or smells, ran fine.

First pic shows the stock airbox, second shows the screen on top of the Filtrete panel, third shows the intake system that replaced the stock airbox.
I *really* hope you're trolling. No, adding a screen on top that cuts airflow by more than 50% doesn't make things any better.
 
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