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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I bought my truck, I got it with open diffs. At the time I thought 4 wheel drive was 4 wheel drive. I have since learned that I;
A) was not correct, and
B) if I care to, I can have an aftermarket e-locker installed.
Has anyone done this? If so How did it turn out? Is there anything I need
to be aware of if I decide to do more than talk about this?
If it helps, my truck is a 2018 STX supercrew 4x4.
 

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2013 XLT 302A 145" Screw
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I would rather have a limited slip type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I bought my truck, I got it with open diffs. At the time I thought 4 wheel drive was 4 wheel drive. I have since learned that I;
A) was not correct, and
B) if I care to, I can have an aftermarket e-locker installed.
Has anyone done this? If so How did it turn out? Is there anything I need
to be aware of if I decide to do more than talk about this?
If it helps, my truck is a 2018 STX supercrew 4x4.
Can you elaborate please?
 

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2013 XLT 302A 145" Screw
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IDK why you would prefer it. I like it because it is always working and I can turn with it working. I have had several vehicles equipped with them as OEM.
 

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@rdsii64 I HAD the factory e-locker and dumped it for an Eaton Detroit True Trac mechanical LSD. It is similar to the Torsen Type (non-clutch) they use in the Mustang now.

The elocker is great if you do rock climbing, but never need it to exceed 20mph (the stock unit disengages). And I hated the "Octagon Shaped" turns whether forward on the street but especially when backing up. There are some who have made changes to modify the elocker similar to a Raptor. But it doesn't overcome the fact that an elocker has NO SLIP and makes full-time street use impractical on dry roads.

With the Eaton Detroit True Trac, I have FULL-TIME LSD, no "Octagon Shaped" turns, unlimited speed AND superior for Street Use which is 95% of my driving.

I just did this during the summer, and my only regret, is not tossing the e-lock differential for the Eaton Detroit True Trac when I first bought the truck.

I suggest you test drive a new truck with the e-locker and you'll see what I mean.

PS: Most of the time, you won't have your e-lock turned on, especially on dry roads. So you are basically back to an open differential.
 

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e-lockers are a good sales pitch, after that they are cool in concept IMO. They don't handle much power if you go down that road, they tend to be problematic sooner than your traditional LSD, Its hard to be a LSD in terms of reliability, and performance wise its the same at worse and better if you ask most, as some guys have mentioned above. We have had 2 trucks with E-Lockers from Factory, we are obviously performance guys, we have ditched them both times. If you already have one then great use it until it breaks if it suits your needs. If you didn't already have one, I wouldn't go out seeking one.
 

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I'll counter the expressed wisdom, it's my nature.
I have had several vehicles with automatic lockers and limited slips, over 50 years of driving. They worked well and helped with how I drove and used a vehicle at that time.
The problems with cluch limited slip, the clutch pack can and does wear till ineffective. Because they are often engaged by clutch packs such limited slips can engage at the wrong time, sometimes abruptly and unexpectedly. Even a geared Torsen/TrueTrack limited slip can behave unpredictably with a jerky engagement (can is the big factor, depends on how well it's setup).
Mechanical lockers, either full engaged or open often with accompanying effects on traction, vehicle attitude can skitter possibly jump to the side, and audible noise.

Electric and manual differential lockers offer traction like a spooled differential but are operator/driver controlled. On as needed, off otherwise. The largest complaint about e-locking differentials is the speed/MPH limited disengagement. For street and pavement this is mostly acceptable, offload use is even better due to the low speed used and the ability to engage as/when needed.

I have now 4 years with the Ford E-Locker. My truck is driven 80/85% on pavement often in snow/ice I do not race it but do drive spirited when possible. The E-Locker can be engaged for straight line traction/acceleration and the dis-engage is triggered at 20+ MPH.Dis-engaged and unlocked are not the same thing, as long a power is supplied to the gear train it stays engaged, only unlocking as power is cut to the driveline (my truck seems to have the gearing rather tightly setup).

I think claims of differing performance from users is often due to the setup of the gearing. Sloppy limited slip and locking differentials can accentuate problems, a well setup open differential can almost seem like a limited slip. Lots of gray area between them.
On road, a limited slip or driver operated locker works best, limited slip can be ok as long as the driver knows what to expect.
Road racing/slalom, a well setup open works better than a limited slip, a locking differential can upset the turn balance of the vehicle.
Drag racing, the auto locker or spooled differential (driver error removed), on many very high HP vehicles and open differential is a must (HP/weight combinations where differing contact patches could cause un-controlability).

Like most everything this is opinion based on my experience and may not be popular opinion. KM
 

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There is litterally no set up on an Eaton tru trac. You drop the carrier in, set up the gears and smash the gas. They aren't notchy in anyway.

I got rid of a notchy auto locker for the tru trac in my 79' Scout II Dana 44 for that reason.

And all you have to do is feather the brake and gas to get the tire in the air to lock up and send power to the tire on the ground.



Op: what kind of 4x4 do you need? Boat ramps? Dirt roads? Sand? Rocks?
 

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There is litterally no set up on an Eaton tru trac. You drop the carrier in, set up the gears and smash the gas. They aren't notchy in anyway.

I got rid of a notchy auto locker for the tru trac in my 79' Scout II Dana 44 for that reason.

And all you have to do is feather the brake and gas to get the tire in the air to lock up and send power to the tire on the ground.



Op: what kind of 4x4 do you need? Boat ramps? Dirt roads? Sand? Rocks?
May be a tight set of open gears, They both will sipn if I do not watch my foot. Tomorrow it will be fixed with new hopefully no bee so touchy tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There is litterally no set up on an Eaton tru trac. You drop the carrier in, set up the gears and smash the gas. They aren't notchy in anyway.

I got rid of a notchy auto locker for the tru trac in my 79' Scout II Dana 44 for that reason.

And all you have to do is feather the brake and gas to get the tire in the air to lock up and send power to the tire on the ground.



Op: what kind of 4x4 do you need? Boat ramps? Dirt roads? Sand? Rocks?
My intended use is getting into and out of the areas I plan to hunt during wet weather. When the weather is dry, while nice to have, you can get by without 4WD where I hunt(state game lands in eastern North Carolina). After a good rain 4WD is a must.
 

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My intended use is getting into and out of the areas I plan to hunt during wet weather. When the weather is dry, while nice to have, you can get by without 4WD where I hunt(state game lands in eastern North Carolina). After a good rain 4WD is a must.
Either option will work well. Tru trac or e locker
 

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Ill give another shoutout for a truetrac as well. Cheaper than a locker and more useful for 99% of the miles you will put on the truck. It works all the time whether you are on pavement, snow, dirt, whatever.

I ran them front and rear in my Jeep Liberty and it was a fantastic setup.

 

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On the topic of Truetracs, Lexus just dropped the new LX600(rebadge Toyota Landcruiser) and guess what, it comes with a torsen style rear diff in some models!
 
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I had a Truetrac in my old Cherokee as well. I was looking at having the factory style trac-lok installed, but the more I read about the Truetrac, the more I liked it. Only regret was waiting 12 years to have it done. Before I saw my truck up close and discovered it had the e-locker, I was looking at having a Truetrac installed. Maybe when I get my 2nd million, I'll have one installed up front.
 

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From KMP Drivetrain Solutions / Differentials / Torsen vs. plated limited slip differential.
"Downsides
The car will not move with one of the wheels in the air. If one wheel is in the air or has no traction at all, it will only take very little torque to turn that wheel. It is necessary to apply torque to the gears to generate the required thrust force to maintain the bias ratio. Without torque, the gears will not be pressed together and no friction will be generated, so the gears can rotate freely. The unloaded wheel will have high speed, but can only transfer very little or no torque. The helical LSD will send torque to the wheel with traction according to the bias ratio, BUT four times zero still equals zero. This means the wheel with grip will not receive any torque and the LSD acts as an open differential. The plated LSD will have (limited) torque available to the wheel with traction due to the preload in the clutch pack.
Another downside is that the torque bias ratio is determined by design and cannot be altered. Different bias ratio’s can be accomplished by varying the side gear helix angles or the friction characteristics for the primary components."

This type of comment pops up frequently about geared limited slips. I have driven plated and lockers, but no geared TruTack or Torsen. Those who have, how much does this affect the real world use? KM
 

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From KMP Drivetrain Solutions / Differentials / Torsen vs. plated limited slip differential.
"Downsides
The car will not move with one of the wheels in the air. If one wheel is in the air or has no traction at all, it will only take very little torque to turn that wheel. It is necessary to apply torque to the gears to generate the required thrust force to maintain the bias ratio. Without torque, the gears will not be pressed together and no friction will be generated, so the gears can rotate freely. The unloaded wheel will have high speed, but can only transfer very little or no torque. The helical LSD will send torque to the wheel with traction according to the bias ratio, BUT four times zero still equals zero. This means the wheel with grip will not receive any torque and the LSD acts as an open differential. The plated LSD will have (limited) torque available to the wheel with traction due to the preload in the clutch pack.
Another downside is that the torque bias ratio is determined by design and cannot be altered. Different bias ratio’s can be accomplished by varying the side gear helix angles or the friction characteristics for the primary components."

This type of comment pops up frequently about geared limited slips. I have driven plated and lockers, but no geared TruTack or Torsen. Those who have, how much does this affect the real world use? KM
Press the brake to load the wheel with no traction and it sends power to the other wheel. Can do it with any LSD. Works well with the trutrac.
 
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