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2020 F150 XLT Black pkg, max tow pkg, 3.5 TT Eco
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Are these legit? They are claiming 20hp with these and a tune. I have the stock intake system on my 2020 XLT with an AEM dry filter but may get a BCB tune. Wondering if anyone else on here has used these tubes and has had good results.
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If you are maxing out your turbos, then yes. They have shown to a few tuners to allow more airflow.

Bottom line, the easier the air can get into the turbo, the more it will push out.


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If you are maxing out your turbos, then yes. They have shown to a few tuners to allow more airflow.

Bottom line, the easier the air can get into the turbo, the more it will push out.


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This. Dont expect big gains unless you are pushing the turbos.
 

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I wonder if the stock turbos can be pushed far enough to actually need more than the factory CAI can provide?
 

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I wonder if the stock turbos can be pushed far enough to actually need more than the factory CAI can provide?
Yes, it's a shaft speed thing. Factory inlet tubes are designed to create vacuum at the inlet of the turbo, that increases shaft speeds, higher shaft speeds less efficent and less overall flow.

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I wonder if the stock turbos can be pushed far enough to actually need more than the factory CAI can provide?
Supposedly the CAI can get stuffed up on higher power trucks(2018+). I don't think a stock turbo 2011-16 would really be pushing the stock CAI.
 

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Supposedly the CAI can get stuffed up on higher power trucks(2018+). I don't think a stock turbo 2011-16 would really be pushing the stock CAI.
Couldnt this still be beneficial on a Gen1 truck? Just thinking of the analogy of sucking air through a small or big straw. The factory inlet tubes narrow down to even smaller than the inlet diameter in the turbo combined with the flattened tube on the passenger side would this not make the turbo have to “work harder” to pull air in?
If the tube was smooth and wide open with the ability to provide more air than the turbo could suck wouldn’t it work more efficiently?
 

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Couldnt this still be beneficial on a Gen1 truck? Just thinking of the analogy of sucking air through a small or big straw. The factory inlet tubes narrow down to even smaller than the inlet diameter in the turbo combined with the flattened tube on the passenger side would this not make the turbo have to “work harder” to pull air in?
If the tube was smooth and wide open with the ability to provide more air than the turbo could suck wouldn’t it work more efficiently?
Yes but apparently they dont fit on the stock turbos. The passenger side tube hits the ac compressor. The passenger side is the crappier of the two.

I would love if AMS made a set of 11-14 tubes, i’d buy them in a second.
 

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Yes but apparently they dont fit on the stock turbos. The passenger side tube hits the ac compressor. The passenger side is the crappier of the two.

I would love if AMS made a set of 11-14 tubes, i’d buy them in a second.
I think @Blown F-150 has figured out how to make them fit on 1st gens, mind you he does not have stock turbos
 

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Ordered mine!!
 

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When talking about Flow... don't forget Poiseuille's law. It takes into account many factors but the biggest bang for your buck is going to be increasing the diameter of the pipe to increase flow. An increase in diameter affects flow to the 4th power. Not just multiplied by 4... but to the 4th power. It's the most important aspect when talking about flow. So eliminate constrictions, find out the "inlet" or compressor size and make that your benchmark. If new pipes are any wider than that, you waste money. Any narrower, you just created a secondary, tertiary bottleneck and more turbulence. If we can get some piping that is exactly the same diameter all the way through, we increase our chances of laminar flow and decrease turbulent flow and maybe not flow more than the turbos will allow, but will decrease the duty cycle of the turbos, increase the lifespan and maybe tune to handle more flow.

That being said, I would be all over a product that factors these simple physics tricks for my Gen I.
 

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When talking about Flow... don't forget Poiseuille's law. It takes into account many factors but the biggest bang for your buck is going to be increasing the diameter of the pipe to increase flow. An increase in diameter affects flow to the 4th power. Not just multiplied by 4... but to the 4th power. It's the most important aspect when talking about flow. So eliminate constrictions, find out the "inlet" or compressor size and make that your benchmark. If new pipes are any wider than that, you waste money. Any narrower, you just created a secondary, tertiary bottleneck and more turbulence. If we can get some piping that is exactly the same diameter all the way through, we increase our chances of laminar flow and decrease turbulent flow and maybe not flow more than the turbos will allow, but will decrease the duty cycle of the turbos, increase the lifespan and maybe tune to handle more flow.

That being said, I would be all over a product that factors these simple physics tricks for my Gen I.
The stock turbo inducers on a gen 1 are like 36mm, less than 1.5”. Even the 2018+ trucks are only ~41mm. I think the stock tubes are at least that big but they make weird bends and stuff.

I know some guys on the Jeep Liberty CRD forum had exhaust shops fabricate up hot and cold side pipes out of bent exhaust pipe. So basically a one piece 1.5 inch pipe that went straight from the turbo to intercooler.

I think piecing together tubes from silicone couplers and aluminum tube might not be ideal.
 

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The stock turbo inducers on a gen 1 are like 36mm, less than 1.5”. Even the 2018+ trucks are only ~41mm. I think the stock tubes are at least that big but they make weird bends and stuff.

I know some guys on the Jeep Liberty CRD forum had exhaust shops fabricate up hot and cold side pipes out of bent exhaust pipe. So basically a one piece 1.5 inch pipe that went straight from the turbo to intercooler.

I think piecing together tubes from silicone couplers and aluminum tube might not be ideal.

I agree. The application of the smaller turbos, smaller primaries and smaller compressor housings is to maintain flow via velocity. Piecing kits together will increase Reynolds number and increase way more turbulent flow to where it will hamper that velocity needed by the compressor.

The one piece mandrel bent pipe is the BEST thing you can do to maintain laminar flow.

Do you know what the stock coupler size is on the gen 1 turbos inducer side?
 

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I agree. The application of the smaller turbos, smaller primaries and smaller compressor housings is to maintain flow via velocity. Piecing kits together will increase Reynolds number and increase way more turbulent flow to where it will hamper that velocity needed by the compressor.

The one piece mandrel bent pipe is the BEST thing you can do to maintain laminar flow.

Do you know what the stock coupler size is on the gen 1 turbos inducer side?
Here is the coupler that comes with the AMS tubes and a comparison to the stock Gen1 inlet tubes. Based on my experience, there are legitimate gains to be had with a better inlet tube on the passenger side over stock. Given the design of the drivers side, I’m not convinced there is much to be gained on that side. At this point I’m reaching out to local fab shops and seeing if I can get a small run of the passenger pipes going for us Gen 1 folks. I already have access to the needed silicone couplers.






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Here is the coupler that comes with the AMS tubes and a comparison to the stock Gen1 inlet tubes. Based on my experience, there are legitimate gains to be had with a better inlet tube on the passenger side over stock. Given the design of the drivers side, I’m not convinced there is much to be gained on that side. At this point I’m reaching out to local fab shops and seeing if I can get a small run of the passenger pipes going for us Gen 1 folks. I already have access to the needed silicone couplers.






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What was ford thinking with that tube.
 

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What was ford thinking with that tube.
Some engineering banged away at a keyboard, made sure there was some margin in their numbers and said "that will work perfect for the demands of the turbo". lol.

You can see the major improvement they made in the stock tubes with the Gen 2.
 

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What was ford thinking with that tube.
I've been asking that since the PCV system was explained to be an error as well. You can tell this is the first turbo platform the F150 engineers have worked on.
 

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Here is the coupler that comes with the AMS tubes and a comparison to the stock Gen1 inlet tubes. Based on my experience, there are legitimate gains to be had with a better inlet tube on the passenger side over stock. Given the design of the drivers side, I’m not convinced there is much to be gained on that side. At this point I’m reaching out to local fab shops and seeing if I can get a small run of the passenger pipes going for us Gen 1 folks. I already have access to the needed silicone couplers.






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How about the pipe side of the coupler? I think I'm going to make a boost leak tester.
 
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