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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I took the family out for a vacation to Wyoming from Washington, with a week long stop in Utah. This was the second time doing the drive and the truck did great, my 12' F-150 just crossed the 100k mile mark too on the return trip. I recently added a water/meth kit and a 19 row Setrab oil cooler with a Improved Racing OIl Filter sandwich plate with 212F t-stat, ran 10AN fittings and hose.The intake temps were MUCH lower and the oil cooler worked pretty well until pulling long grades, which is to be expected. Cruising around at 65-75mph with moderate hills the oil temps never went over 220F it would bounce from 211-215 as the thermostat opened.The only maintenance things I did to the truck on the trip was, new spark plugs as the ones in it had 35k on em and I anxious and a pretrip brake bleed, it was 40k miles over due..... The shocks were shot too so I replaced them with Bilstein 5100s, those plus the air bags made towing with the truck better than ever too, didn't even need the sway controller on it in the wind. I guess my overall review is, I love my truck, it did great and I drive the absolute piss out of it. We towed a 28' 9000-10000 bumper puller TT and the only draw back to a eco-boost that I experience when towing, is how fast its small engine displacement can exchange heat. Even with my "extensive" mods the truck is limited to how much load the motor can turn into heat over a certain amount of time. With the power the truck has with even a stock tune its biggest limiting factor is it wants to go forward, but then you look at the hill you have left and then engine temps... That probably only applies when its 90F out and your towing over 10k, in any pick-up, diesel or gas. If I get any free time I will post some pictures of the oil cooler setup and meth kit.
 

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More details/pics of oil cooler setup?

How are you monitoring oil temps...?
 

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Is it really the size of the engine?
In my experience larger engines heat up the coolant more.
I always thought it was all the heat transfered to the coolant from cooling the turbos.
 

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Smaller engine, more power. When the turbos start producing positive pressure you start injecting lots more fuel. More fuel = more heat.

Also our motors like to make power down low in the rpm where n/a motors make their power up top. More rmp = more coolant flow.

If you look at the coolant lines to the turbos they aren't that big.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Is it really the size of the engine?
In my experience larger engines heat up the coolant more.
I always thought it was all the heat transfered to the coolant from cooling the turbos.
From the HVAC/Mechanical/Refrigeration guys I work with there is only so much you can pull away from the displacement/mass. Like in my case I added a fan and it made no difference. Now I have a oil cooler and it makes a difference until I reach the load limit of heat exchange the displacement and mass of the engine is able to effectively remove. Basically if I mash the pedal to get up a hill at 70mph with 10k on the ass of the pickup, which it has no problem doing. I will eventually reach a point where no reasonable size of intercooler, oil cooler, tranny cooler will be effective and I will essentially be limited to the amount of load I can pull from the engine over time, because it produces heat faster than it can be removed, it will eventually overheat and stall the truck. This goes for every power train too, upping the displacement and or moving to diesel doesn't fix that exchange issue ether, it just pushes the limit out slightly. I should mention I am a electrician by trade so this all may be bull ****, but that is how I understand how it was explained to me.

I'll post some pictures this weekend of the oil cooler if I can find the time.
 

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I think the fast heatup is primarily due to small volume of water in the system. It's only 3.5-gal. My old 6.0 superduty was 7.0-gallons. More water = takes longer to warm up.

Don't mind the small volume in winter when the truck is warm 2-3 minutes after being turned on in the morning. The 6.0 was lucky to make heat 15-min down the road, but diesels also make very little heat at low loads which doesn't help.
 

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From the HVAC/Mechanical/Refrigeration guys I work with there is only so much you can pull away from the displacement/mass. Like in my case I added a fan and it made no difference. Now I have a oil cooler and it makes a difference until I reach the load limit of heat exchange the displacement and mass of the engine is able to effectively remove. Basically if I mash the pedal to get up a hill at 70mph with 10k on the ass of the pickup, which it has no problem doing. I will eventually reach a point where no reasonable size of intercooler, oil cooler, tranny cooler will be effective and I will essentially be limited to the amount of load I can pull from the engine over time, because it produces heat faster than it can be removed, it will eventually overheat and stall the truck. This goes for every power train too, upping the displacement and or moving to diesel doesn't fix that exchange issue ether, it just pushes the limit out slightly. I should mention I am a electrician by trade so this all may be bull ****, but that is how I understand how it was explained to me.
I think that pretty much sums up the situation under those conditions. This explains why all these upgrades only offer "some" relief. I got the most significant improvement with the larger transmission oil cooler, so I want to continue this line of inquiry to the motor oil. I have seen the baked inside of the motor. The motor oil gets way too hot on these trucks. When I change my oil @ 3k, it's absolutely beat to death. Definitely interested in seeing your setup for this.
 

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I think that pretty much sums up the situation under those conditions. This explains why all these upgrades only offer "some" relief. I got the most significant improvement with the larger transmission oil cooler, so I want to continue this line of inquiry to the motor oil. I have seen the baked inside of the motor. The motor oil gets way too hot on these trucks. When I change my oil @ 3k, it's absolutely beat to death. Definitely interested in seeing your setup for this.
Agreed on the oil temperature.

I can live with the shortcomings on ECT because they are limited to a very finite situation. (towing fast on long steep grades)
Although I wish it was avoidable, I CAN slow down and/or lock gears out for that portion of my trip.

But the oil temperature (and pressure on Gen2) is just the opposite of the ECT extremes. Instead of only occasionally being outside my comfort zone, both are almost always too hot and low for my tastes.

The oil pressure issue looks like something with a remedy shortly. A really good oil temperature solution would be nice too.

Short of a dry $sump solution, of course. :)

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Smaller engine, more power. When the turbos start producing positive pressure you start injecting lots more fuel. More fuel = more heat.

Also our motors like to make power down low in the rpm where n/a motors make their power up top. More rmp = more coolant flow.

If you look at the coolant lines to the turbos they aren't that big.
The turbos shouldnt NEED coolant though. Just a little bit is all it should take to make a difference.

I am not conviced they are the reason for the excessive ECT’s since they need so little coolant.

I push way more boost and flow through my jeep’s turbo and it has no coolant feed. Does just fine making 23-24 psi here at 6500’. And it is always online, it sits at 10-12 psi just cruising on the freeway.
 

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Remember the coolant supply to the turbos on our trucks is at the end of the line. This after the oil cooler diverts 50%, the block dumps its heat, then the heads dump their heat. The turbo feed is off the back of the head. I think the burst of power from the turbos makes the oil, block and heads get so hot that the turbo cooling just isn't happening. I can't imagine what that coolant temp must be going into the turbo. It's a vicious cycle. Hell it might even be adding to the turbo heat!
 

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From what I understand on water cooled turbos, the main function of the coolant line is to keep the bearings from cooking when the engine is off. They are piped for a "thermosyphon" where the hot coolant rises and goes up into the head, drawing cooler water from the block when the engine is off. When the engine is running the oil is doing the bulk of the cooling work, as it has done for decades on oil-cooled turbos.

In my opinion, the only advantage to this arrangement is that it allows you to shutoff the engine when the turbos are hot without cooking them. This allows them to sell turbos to the masses whom have no idea about any of this. For the enthusiast, it's probably overkill. I always let me engine run and cool down after working it. But it is nice for a daily driver to not have to worry about turbo cooldown like I did with my previous diesel.

Interesting article on Water Cooled Turbos:


Really surprised Ford didn't put an oil temp sensor on these motors. I drove an entry level 2017 Ram 1500 "Trademan" with the Hemi and it's got an oil temp sensor I can pull up in the small dash display. Althought that truck runs hot! 240F+ in stop & go when it's hot outside.
 

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You think maybe Ford just doesn't want us to know that oil temp?

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Been busy as hell at work i'll get some pictures up this weekend for sure. I believe you can get the oil temp if you do the dealer trick with flipping the key forward and back 30 times or some ****. I just added a sensor because the sandwich plate had a spot for one.
 

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From what I understand on water cooled turbos, the main function of the coolant line is to keep the bearings from cooking when the engine is off. They are piped for a "thermosyphon" where the hot coolant rises and goes up into the head, drawing cooler water from the block when the engine is off. When the engine is running the oil is doing the bulk of the cooling work, as it has done for decades on oil-cooled turbos.

In my opinion, the only advantage to this arrangement is that it allows you to shutoff the engine when the turbos are hot without cooking them. This allows them to sell turbos to the masses whom have no idea about any of this. For the enthusiast, it's probably overkill. I always let me engine run and cool down after working it. But it is nice for a daily driver to not have to worry about turbo cooldown like I did with my previous diesel.

Interesting article on Water Cooled Turbos:


Really surprised Ford didn't put an oil temp sensor on these motors. I drove an entry level 2017 Ram 1500 "Trademan" with the Hemi and it's got an oil temp sensor I can pull up in the small dash display. Althought that truck runs hot! 240F+ in stop & go when it's hot outside.
Yeah the rams tell you quite a bit right on the dash. I had a Rebel a little while back as a rental and pretty much had all you could want. There is no turbos so there is far less **** to worry about.
 

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Been busy as hell at work i'll get some pictures up this weekend for sure. I believe you can get the oil temp if you do the dealer trick with flipping the key forward and back 30 times or some ****. I just added a sensor because the sandwich plate had a spot for one.
I didn't think the Ecoboost even had an oil temp sensor from the factory?
 

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I didn't think the Ecoboost even had an oil temp sensor from the factory?
There's no pid for it, that I can find.
I assume that indicates that there's no sensor to fetch data from?

It's remarkable considering how much cpu and data it takes to run even these motors. Literally thousands of calculations per second!

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Been busy as hell at work i'll get some pictures up this weekend for sure. I believe you can get the oil temp if you do the dealer trick with flipping the key forward and back 30 times or some ****. I just added a sensor because the sandwich plate had a spot for one.
Just curious if you have any data on oil temp with your setup. Was hoping to also see some install pics, but this thread seems to have gotten buried.
 
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