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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
first off sorry I am so confused, I am trying to figure out what I can tow safely. the truck is a 2018 f150 3.5eco, 4x4, short box,XLT, max tow, off road. so the TT I am looking at is 5600 dry with a tongue weight of 609, I do have a WDH, air bags, 34" ko2, icon stage 2( upper control arms, 2.5 coilers, 2.5 rear shocks. I am trying to see if I can tow this with out to much problems, and possibly my dirt bike WR250f 300lbs, I also have a 150lbs generator, a small wife and two 40lbs dogs. what do you all think I know I got the power to pull it but will the truck be under too much stress? I tried looking at all the GVW numbers and short of buying the trailer and bring it to the scales I don't know?
plz help me out!!!!
thanks you

ps the white truck in the pic was totaled so that ant the truck
 

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Your only concern will be payload. Drivers door jamb yellow and white sticker. It’ll show you what your exact truck is setup for.


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Your door jamb has a yellow sticker that tells you what your cargo capacity for your truck is. Add your tongue weight, everything you put in the bed, all your passengers, and your fuel tank full.

If it's less than the yellow tag says, your good to go!

Based on your description, you have plenty of truck. You certainly have the power to roll.

Get that hitch configured properly and I bet you will even enjoy that haul. :)

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Without seeing the numbers on the the door I think youd be close but probably ok. The power is definitely not an issue.
 

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Just one more thing, Pay attention to your loaded tongue weight, that can vary a lot and that could put you over. Again I dont know the spec on your truck so hopefully its a non issue
 

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Scales tell the true tale. From what you describe, it shouldn't be an issue, but if you have a scale close, I'd load it up for the first trip and take it there. I honestly can't say what air bags/shocks/springs do for towing other than improving the ride, so with that said your issue is going to be payload. I'm guessing it is somewhere around 2000?

Ok sorry I just re-read your post. I'm leaving the above because I feel like your going to pull the trigger on the trailer anyways. That said, I've given 200 lbs for you, 100 lbs for the wife, and 26 gallons of fuel (not including the dirtbike and generator). That puts you at 1595 lbs. Drop on another 12 lbs for those, and another 100lbs for gas. 1707. Now you load the trailer up with gear, food, "stuff", and lets say your tongue weight goes up to 840 (15% of 5600), that would put you at 1938 of payload.

If your payload is 2000 lbs, that works, but your pretty maxed out. That said maybe all the work you have done helps with that, I dunno. In the end, you might have to ditch items like the generator or dirtbike. Water is 8 lbs per gallon, in case you plan on hauling that with you. It wouldn't change payload one to one (if its water in the tank of trailer) other than it will increase tongue weight (by how much depends on how much water and where the tank is located).

I know in your minds eye it all seems like no problem, its only after you truly add up the numbers that you see where the problems arise. Likely your tongue weight won't be 840, and even if it is, your still within payload (if your sticker says 2000 lbs).
 

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Scales tell the true tale. From what you describe, it shouldn't be an issue, but if you have a scale close, I'd load it up for the first trip and take it there. I honestly can't say what air bags/shocks/springs do for towing other than improving the ride, so with that said your issue is going to be payload. I'm guessing it is somewhere around 2000?

Ok sorry I just re-read your post. I'm leaving the above because I feel like your going to pull the trigger on the trailer anyways. That said, I've given 200 lbs for you, 100 lbs for the wife, and 26 gallons of fuel (not including the dirtbike and generator). That puts you at 1595 lbs. Drop on another 12 lbs for those, and another 100lbs for gas. 1707. Now you load the trailer up with gear, food, "stuff", and lets say your tongue weight goes up to 840 (15% of 5600), that would put you at 1938 of payload.

If your payload is 2000 lbs, that works, but your pretty maxed out. That said maybe all the work you have done helps with that, I dunno. In the end, you might have to ditch items like the generator or dirtbike. Water is 8 lbs per gallon, in case you plan on hauling that with you. It wouldn't change payload one to one (if its water in the tank of trailer) other than it will increase tongue weight (by how much depends on how much water and where the tank is located).

I know in your minds eye it all seems like no problem, its only after you truly add up the numbers that you see where the problems arise. Likely your tongue weight won't be 840, and even if it is, your still within payload (if your sticker says 2000 lbs).
I am pretty sure payload has already factored in fluids. It is based on the wet vehicle weight, not the dry.
 

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I am pretty sure payload has already factored in fluids. It is based on the wet vehicle weight, not the dry.
It absolutely is. My truck, fully gassed up and ready to go, came in 20 lbs under the sticker. That was also with 33" duratracs, airbags and a catch can installed.
 

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I am pretty sure payload has already factored in fluids. It is based on the wet vehicle weight, not the dry.
That would be great news, but not what I had always figured. If 36 gallons of fuel are NOT counted against my yellow sticker, it's a sweet margin I never knew I had.

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I would offer up to weigh it and not try to add up guesstimates. My truck has a 6500 gvwr and a yellow sticker offering up 1560 payload. However, with me in the truck, a full tank, and my toolbox with about 200 lbs worth of tools and straps, it scales 5600 all day long. Subtract 5600 from 6500 and, well, I don't get 1560.

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I did not know this, but thats cool. Shaves 156 lbs off the calculations then. Not a lot, but apparently enough for a generator! :)
How convenient is that! For what it’s worth it also includes the weight of 150lb driver. In my case that gives me an extra 15 lbs to work with


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How convenient is that! For what it’s worth it also includes the weight of 150lb driver. In my case that gives me an extra 15 lbs to work with


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Go figure! Well that saves him another 150lbs then. Helpful if he is close to the max already. The biggest takeaway should be that it is hard to estimate weights of travel trailers. Dry weights, tongue weight, its all meaningless unless you scale it. And you want to scale it as if using it, not as you pull off the dealer lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks for the info I did run some ruff numbers on all the anticipated weights, I do not think I will be able to run generator and dirt bike. but this is what I got so far, yellow sticker is 1785lbs and max loaded trailer weight (whatever that means) is 12,700 and GCWR is 18,100 and my max rated weight for the trailer loaded is 7,500. dry its 5,500 and just looking at all the stuff going into it its about max 500 not counting water, with water 400 so I am sitting at 6400 and (500 for gear is vary over estimated). now the truck, people is about 380 with dogs, then fuel 36g is 216lbs and about 50lbs of gear and then 10g of can fuel 60lbs, and generator 150lbs
In truck total
850-900lbs
trailer
max!! 6500
so I am not sure but looks like if I use the yellow sticker at 1785 and subtract 750 hitch, bed gear max 300, 380 in cab, fuel 216= 140ish so dose this mean I am pushing the MAX upper limit for my truck?? or am I just not understanding this lol thank you all again
 

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Discussion Starter #16
also would a upgrade intercooler be a good idea? will this make a difference for real? with out tune or exhaust
 

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No amount of aftermarket parts will increase the tow rating, so lets just start with that. Dry listed weights on trailers are often misleading, as most are before they add in things like propane tanks and batterys, but it could include other things. So lets just break this down again:

Max weight of trailer you are allowed = 7500 lbs
Trailer you are looking at, estimated weight of 6500 lbs
Tongue weight of 10-15% of 6500. Lets go with 13%. = 845 lbs
Hitch weight (yes the wdh weight counts), lets estimate that at 125 lbs
Dogs/people = 380, but if that includes you, you can subtract 150 so that equals 230 lbs
I'm not sure what can fuel is, but your saying 60 lbs
Truck gear at 50 lbs
Generator at 150 lbs
Dirt bike (maybe?) at 300 lbs

Payload is 1785.

1785
-845 tongue est
-125 hitch est
-230 people with allowance for 150 lb driver
-60 can fuel
-50 truck gear
-150 generator
-300 dirt bike
= 25 lbs.

Not a ton of wiggle room there. You might need to weigh your truck like mass-hole has to confirm what bobross has said about fuel weight already being counted. If that is truly the case, you seem like you might be ok. But the true test, no matter what, is to weigh at the scale. Many a person has calculated and recalculated, bought the truck before the trailer, only to find out that they are not within the recommended limits, and had to take a bath on the current truck to upgrade to a 250 or whatever.

I am by no means an expert on the subject, so take this information with a grain of salt and use at your own risk. There are lots of online calculators out there and forms you can print out to take with you to the scale with truck and trailer to figure this out.

You should consider that newbie trailer owners often accumulate more gear than when they start, and that gear adds up. Say your trailer loaded scaled in at 7500. It doesn't automatically mean that your tongue is going to weigh 1125, but it could (thats 15%). Thats the dirt bike right there.

In the end, the further away from payload you are, the better off you will be. For me, when the family and I go on trips, you know whats in the bed of my truck? Usually zero. I have no desire to get close to the limits. Also consider things like a bed cover or truck box...subs you put in the back seat, whatever....all of that counts against payload. Your control arms, do they weigh more? Air bags? Shocks? These all might help with how it rides as you tow, but can also count against your payload as its not stock anymore.

Take it slow. Research more. Ask in trailer forums about your specific trailer. Don't take everything with you all at once. Be prepared to leave some of it home. Be prepared to find a more suitable trailer if needed. Be prepared to bite the bullet on a bigger truck. And lastly, don't ever listen to the trailer dealer about what you can and can't tow. I know that lumps all of them together and maybe it isn't 100% fair, so apologies to any of the good ones.

My first truck for towing our trailer was an envoy. First trip, 30 min away 50 mph roads....was perfect. Second trip, with the kids and more gear, on major highways....white knuckled so much that I had to avoid the highway. 3rd trip, I bought a Tahoe. Now I have the 150. Tahoe was a good truck, towed it well, but it was old and tired and needed to be retired. New truck, much better suited to the task.

We picked up the trailer end of april. By june I had the tahoe. I crunched the numbers. I added the extra trans cooler to the envoy, new thermostat, shocks, all that. Didn't matter. Had to do it.
 

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This^ all of this. WEIGH IT! I would never have guessed my truck weighs what it does as it sits. You'd be surprised how much miscellaneous stuff will add up to.

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I hold true to the weighing thing. That said I poked around the internet a bit, and the online 2018 f150 manual. Best I could find is that payload does NOT already factor in a 150lb driver. It says specifically to subtract drivers weight, so based on only that, it would mean generator or bike, not both. I have found a lot of people saying it does include the fuel already, so thats good. Couldn't find it in the manual though.

Short story, you need to weight the truck with a full tank and you in it. That should give enough info to determine what kind of payload you are really talking about....don't quote me though as I'm not sure if any other numbers are needed or not to determine payload. I think its just the GVWR minus the curb weight (what you really weigh on the scale).

Thats at least step one. If you don't have a CAT scale near, you can usually find a certified quarry scale somewhere to use for a small fee. I think dumps also have them, but to me they also have nails and screws and other crap all over too...and i don't want to drive my truck in there lol.
 

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An intercooler will make the truck pull hills more consistently. With my stock CAC i would start strong at the bottom of big climbs but by the top it would be noticeably weaker and intake temps would get up to 190F.
 
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