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Pad swap should also resolve the warping issue.

Here I am being pedantic again. I'm fun at parties like that. You won't regret inviting me.

Rotor warp isn't actually warping of the rotor itself. It is pad material transfer to the rotor in an uneven pattern. That creates surface irregularities known as warped rotor. I'm sure physical rotor warping can happen but that's normally not the case.
Again, probably getting way too complicated to help the OP, but F150s are fairly notorious for out of true rotors causing vibration that is commonly known as warped rotors. The only Ford response is to turn the rotors. Pad swap alone won't stop it.

My observation with several trucks has been it often occurs after an ASE badged tech at a dealership walks away from a tire rotation. At least it did both times on mine under 25k miles.

It never happened again with Powerstop.



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Yeah, in either case you have to turn the rotors.

You could have actual warpage due to extreme torquing of the lugnuts, if same tech is just hammering it on with a pneumatic for too long.
 

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Pad swap should also resolve the warping issue.

Here I am being pedantic again. I'm fun at parties like that. You won't regret inviting me.

Rotor warp isn't actually warping of the rotor itself. It is pad material transfer to the rotor in an uneven pattern. That creates surface irregularities known as warped rotor. I'm sure physical rotor warping can happen but that's normally not the case.
I agree that the "warped rotor" complaint is technically NOT a warped rotor. (the vast majority of the time) I only recently got schooled on this. However, warped or not, the symptoms are the same from the cockpit. And having the rotors turned does result in removing the pad transfer.

http://www.stoptech.com/technical-support/technical-white-papers/-warped-brake-disc-and-other-myths



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I’m going to argue this point just a little bit, not much but a little bit. I’ve turned many hundreds of rotors in my life. Both warped rotors and pad distrution (hot spotting) occur. Rotors warp and is more often seen in a rotor that doesn’t have an integrated hub (i.e. F150). When you start seeing .010” of runout in a rotor, you know it’s not from uneven pad distribution. Truth is most people will be complaining with .005” either runout or pad distribution. Warped hat style rotors often manifest themselves by having a high spot at one point on the rotor and on the opposite side of the rotor 180 degrees from the high spot on the opposite side you’ll have a high spot that often has very nearly the same amount of runout. Sadly, warped “hat style” rotors could in many cases be avoided. When it comes to a hat style rotor, an air gun is the enemy and a torque wrench in the hands of someone properly trained is your friend. Can’t even begin to tell you the number of customers that have come to me with the “I just had my tires rotated” story.

Pad transfer also occurs and isn’t uncommon, it often shows visible hot spots and at times you’ll actually get pad imprint (hard stop, hot brakes, pedal holds brake pads on hot rotor). You’ll diagnose this by measuring rotor thickness in a variety of places on the rotor as opposed to measuring rotor runout. When you get uneven pad distrution ther is little that can be done except to replace the pads and have a fresh surface (new or turned) rotor. In my experience if you’ve got hot spots it’s time for a new rotor. Hot spots make the brake lathe chatter (yes even with a chatter strap) and in most cases you can’t simply turn them off, the metal has been changed and it won’t react the the rest of the rotor around it. Having hard spots on new pads simply cuts a channel in the pad and soon enough you’ll be looking at another brake job. Both of these symptom cause the same feedback to the drivers foot.

Well... heck then, how do you avoid pad transfer? Heat needs to be put into the new brake system gradually with adequate cool down times between braking sessions and ultimately the brakes need to be allowed to cool down completely. First thing is to choose the right pads for your driving style, secondly and equally important is to utilize the manufacturers prescribed break-in procedure. Yes it’s true, most high performance brake pads leave a little on the table when it comes to low speed or cold driving, they need heat and you’re going to need a little more leg. What they leave behind at cooler temps they make up in spades when it comes to spirited driving. Another consideration for some (me) is how much dust do the pads leave on my wheels, I hate brake dust. It’s a compromise and you need to know what you’re looking for when you buy brake pads. Most premium quality pads or brake kits come with instructions on break-in procedures that are right for their pads. High performance pads usually require more attention to detail than a $20 set of pads but proper break-in also offers a second benefit that can help to reduce heat stress that may be inherent in a new rotor. High buck rotors usually come with attention given to stress relieving the rotor, some cryogenically, you are actually paying for something.

Edit: Snake, I feel really stupid now. I posted this and then read your posted link. Good info there but having been involved with daily drivers for over 20 years, day in and day out, I’d disagree with that guys take on no such thing as warped rotors. This said, he’s probably smarter than me. ;) ;) ;)
 

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Don't feel stupid!
I'll take your years of experience over an "expert" analysis everytime.

Besides, I'm betting it's a matter of semantics. Also, what difference does it make if the symptoms AND the solution(s) are the same?

You still gotta either turn them or replace them to fix them. :)

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Discussion Starter #26
Ok, I replaced my front brakes. I have an issue with my right front. The brake pads are not making full contact with the rotor. And the inner stick on wheel weights are rubbing against the caliper. I have remove the wheel multiple time trying different items. 1st I pull the caliper mount back off and made sure the the pads were super clean of rust and anything else for the clips to set in. Test drive still have issue. Pulled back apart and looked at it again. looked like the pads where not parallel with rotor. Pulled rotor and checked with straight edge for wrapage. Rotor is good. Went and purchased a new caliper mount and installed it. Thinking I might of tweaked it when removing the loaded caliper upon the initial disassembly. But the problem is still there. What is left for issue? Caliper? Spindle? Has anyone else run into this issue? It was not there before.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️ Thanks WooBoost for setting me straight. I feel like a real moron! Did the rf Monday before work and then lf Tuesday before work. Wasn’t even pay attention to the pads. Guess I’m at Guy this time around. And have a caliper mount to pay for my lack of paying attention too.
 

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Future upgrades include a set of drilled rotors from Brake Performance, and MGP caliper covers (black with red Ford logo, no bolt holes). My truck has about 600 miles on it now, hoping to get the new rotors and caliper covers by 1000 miles, and reuse the stock pads. Traded in my 2017 Ford Fusion Sport for my 2018 XLT FX4, this is what the rotors and caliper covers looked like on my Fusion Sport. Had low miles on the Sport when I did this, shop said it was okay to reuse the stock pads.
 

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Is there any problem with using the Z36 pads on the stock rear rotors? I'll use drilled and slotted rotors in the front. I realize the rear rotors will need to be sanded to rough them up for pad break in.
 
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