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so is it possible to change the front/side engine and top turbo fittings w/o removing the turbo? I'm having to do the one turbo fitting but I'd hate to do one and not all of them while i'm at it.
Anything is possible with enough beer and tools!

If you’re removing wheelhouse cover and all the CAC tubing on that side of the engine I know for a fact you can get at the fitting on the block. Not sure about the turbo but if
I had to guess I bet you can access it with the right tools.


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Came across this thread and figured get some opinions.

I am replacing the exhaust manifolds on my 2012 F150 ecoboost with the CRP manifolds. Everything is off right now and awaiting reassembly, going to have the turbos inspected prior to reinstall to make sure all is good with them.

Truck has 100,000 miles now.

I was only going to replace the jiffy tight fittings on the turbos. Is this a dumb idea?

Should I be replacing all jiffy tight fittings on the truck and all the turbocharger water feed lines? I did have to wiggle the feed lines up to make room for the turbos to come out and also to get the rear line near the block out of the turbo.

Not sure how touchy those jiffy tights are for sealing if the line is disturbed in some way.
 

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Only really need to replace the LINES if you see any kind of corrosion that will prevent the rubber o-rings from JIFFY TIGHT FITTINGS sealing around the pipe. Slight movement on new o-rings is fine.

I ended up short one jiffy tight fitting and actually used old one with exact o-ring replacement from one with same ID but different thread diameter. Corroded lines were replaced. This all at 170k miles with CRP manifolds and GT Turbos.

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Only really need to replace the jiffy tight fittings if you see any kind of corrosion that will prevent the rubber o-rings from sealing. Slight movement on new o-rings is fine.

I ended up short one jiffy tight fitting and actually used old one with exact o-ring replacement from one with same ID but difference thread diameter. Corroded lines were replaced. This all at 170k miles with CRP manifolds and GT Turbos.

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Thanks I ordered the jiffy tights to the block and the new feed lines from the block to rear of turbo. Going to leave the lines from the rear of the heads to the turbo's as is and just replace the jiffy tight fitting on the turbo. I will try to lay on the intake manifold tonight and see how awful it appears to get those rear head fittings out. If I can get to them I might replace it all.
 

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Not to crush your spirit, but they ain't easy to get at back there and those will be the ones to leak. Tucked right up against the hot engine and the firewall. Plus to remove the Turbos those lines get the worst of the movement.

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So are you saying nut up and just get those fittings out and replace them along with lines? Everything is apart right now so I have the best shot to get at them now.
 

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So are you saying nut up and just get those fittings out and replace them along with lines? Everything is apart right now so I have the best shot to get at them now.
You’re half way there. I’d make’em new while I could get at them.
 

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Yeah its the smart call. To get back to this point I am at least another 5-6 hours worth of work and don't feel like doing that again anytime soon.
 

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So are you saying nut up and just get those fittings out and replace them along with lines? Everything is apart right now so I have the best shot to get at them now.
I personally could not get at the ones on the back of the heads. From what I have read and looking at the diagram, the driver's side is easiest to access with the coolant crossover pipe removed. That means thermostat housing, coolant tube, intake and the crossover. May or may not need the valve cover removed too. This was beyond the scope of what I removed for the manifolds. So my logic was, they aren't leaking now, if I don't interfere with them too much, hopefully they don't leak when I am finished. We'll see in a few days. What I didn't want to do, is bugger it up halfway out or screw it up and be stuck not able to remove it or reinstall the new one. Then you're really up **** creek.

This job is worse than the timing chain fix because there's just no room for a guy with larger hands.

I also thought I read somewhere that the fittings on the head were about a $400 fix at the dealer. Does anyone know? If mine leak I may just cough up the dough, getting tired of pulling half the motor out for these fixes.
 

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I personally could not get at the ones on the back of the heads. From what I have read and looking at the diagram, the driver's side is easiest to access with the coolant crossover pipe removed. That means thermostat housing, coolant tube, intake and the crossover. May or may not need the valve cover removed too. This was beyond the scope of what I removed for the manifolds. So my logic was, they aren't leaking now, if I don't interfere with them too much, hopefully they don't leak when I am finished. We'll see in a few days. What I didn't want to do, is bugger it up halfway out or screw it up and be stuck not able to remove it or reinstall the new one. Then you're really up **** creek.

This job is worse than the timing chain fix because there's just no room for a guy with larger hands.

I also thought I read somewhere that the fittings on the head were about a $400 fix at the dealer. Does anyone know? If mine leak I may just cough up the dough, getting tired of pulling half the motor out for these fixes.
my drivers side is leaking at the turbo, i was quoted $1100 in labor (drivers side only) to replace the jiffy tite fittings at the dealership. An independent shop that specializes in Fords quoted me 836$ out the door. even at $836, it's way more then i want to spend, so I'm going to tackle the job myself with the help of a friend.
 

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I looked at those fittings on the head last night. The service manual on my 2012 states that the coolant crossover pipe is removable by itself without removing other parts.

1) Drain the coolant system.
2) First remove the heater hose clamp and hose off the passenger side of the manifold.
3) Next remove the 3 bolts in the manifold itself.
4) Then you have to remove the LH rear most bolt on the intake. I assume this is the driver's side. The dog ear on the manifold for that 1 bolt sits between the intake and the block.
5) You should then be able to slip the manifold piece out. Be aware there is a pipe with an oring that goes toward the thermostat housing. This is buried under the intake, so not sure how hard it would be to slip that back in given the space constaints back there. I would definitely try to secure it at the other end (Thermostat housing) some how so it doesn't separate at that end.

Once that piece is out you should be able to reach the jiffy fittings. I read somewhere on a forum that a guy was able to unscrew it, but then upon installation instead of putting the fitting in the hole, he put the fitting on the pipe first, then threaded it in the hole. I may give this a try because I already have the fittings. Still on the fence and still not finished with the job. :(
 

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Hijacking this thread as I posted a similar thread a few days ago. I have the leak from the passenger side on the rear of the motor. My question is, what is the best way to reach this thing? I can get my hand back there with the wheel well off. Is it a 19mm? Any tips or tricks would be greatly appreciated!



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Hijacking this thread as I posted a similar thread a few days ago. I have the leak from the passenger side on the rear of the motor. My question is, what is the best way to reach this thing? I can get my hand back there with the wheel well off. Is it a 19mm? Any tips or tricks would be greatly appreciated!


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Did you happen to read the post just before yours? That is the Jiffy tite connector I am talking about. It is in the head and I think it's easier to access from above if you remove the coolant crossover manifold. Hard to get your hand in the side, virtually impossible from underneath.
 
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Did you happen to read the post just before yours? That is the Jiffy tite connector I am talking about. It is in the head and I think it's easier to access from above if you remove the coolant crossover manifold. Hard to get your hand in the side, virtually impossible from underneath.
Sorry. I did read it but didn't realize it was the same one you were talking about. I'm able to get to it from the passenger side wheel well. It's tight but I can get a wrench on it I believe. Just wondering what size wrench it would use. 19mm?


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Try 21mm, just looked back thru my post from two plus years ago where I stated the fittings for turbo and engine block are different sizes. 21mm on the block.

Confirm if that's right!



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So I replaced that coolant crossover piece. I can confirm it comes out without needing to remove the intake. I took the rear bracket for the engine cover off, then did the 3 bolts plus the drivers rear-most intake bolt. The last thing you have to battle is the wiring harness. I disconnected the MAP sensor and I think a boost sensor wire. Fighting the rear wiring harness for a little bit then the piece came out. I could reach down and feel the fittings. Probably doable with a socket wrench this way. If you are up for removing the valve covers, you'll have even more room. After replacing that coolant piece I just didn't have any gas left in the tank to fight with those fittings, so I left it alone. I didn't move them much, so hopefully they won't leak.
 

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Oh, so much remembering the pain! Sad emoji

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So I replaced that coolant crossover piece. I can confirm it comes out without needing to remove the intake. I took the rear bracket for the engine cover off, then did the 3 bolts plus the drivers rear-most intake bolt. The last thing you have to battle is the wiring harness. I disconnected the MAP sensor and I think a boost sensor wire. Fighting the rear wiring harness for a little bit then the piece came out. I could reach down and feel the fittings. Probably doable with a socket wrench this way. If you are up for removing the valve covers, you'll have even more room. After replacing that coolant piece I just didn't have any gas left in the tank to fight with those fittings, so I left it alone. I didn't move them much, so hopefully they won't leak.
I just got the passenger side coolant feed tube off from the rear of the head. Took the pipe off with the fitting attached together.

Went in from the passenger side wheel well with a long 19mm wrench to initially loosen the jiffy tight fitting. From there I was able to bend the heat shield on the rear of the block a bit and fit my hand in and undo the fitting by hand and pulled it out. Going to reinstall that side now. Then it looks like remove the AC compressor and I can do the passenger side block fitting and tube. Then I can install the new manifold on that side and throw the turbo back on.

The side I am unsure of how to tackle is the driverside its crazy tight back there and I can barely get a hand on the fitting to even feel it. I am starting to wonder if I can loosen the trans mount and jack up the engine and trans together to tilt the motor forward a bit and gain a couple extra inches of room? Anyone done this yet?
 

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I just got the passenger side coolant feed tube off from the rear of the head. Took the pipe off with the fitting attached together.

Went in from the passenger side wheel well with a long 19mm wrench to initially loosen the jiffy tight fitting. From there I was able to bend the heat shield on the rear of the block a bit and fit my hand in and undo the fitting by hand and pulled it out. Going to reinstall that side now. Then it looks like remove the AC compressor and I can do the passenger side block fitting and tube. Then I can install the new manifold on that side and throw the turbo back on.

The side I am unsure of how to tackle is the driverside its crazy tight back there and I can barely get a hand on the fitting to even feel it. I am starting to wonder if I can loosen the trans mount and jack up the engine and trans together to tilt the motor forward a bit and gain a couple extra inches of room? Anyone done this yet?
I had my trans on a jack and removed the entire downpipe when I did this job. You can jack up the trans a little more than it is, but I wouldn't push it more than 1" or so. You have to remove the trans mount off the trans, or you will be pulling up on the down pipe. The bolts are a huge PITA. I could only get about 1/4 turn at a time on them.

Some advice on the coolant lines - Keep the feed line off the block until you install the turbo. If this line is attached to the block, it makes it difficult to get enough leverage on it to push it into the turbo. I didn't remove the lower turbo bracket on the block, so I had to wiggle the turbo to get it into place. If that supply line is anchored in the block, the other end needs to be at the right angle or it won't slide in easily.

I got mine all finished and buttoned up. Drives sooooo much better. I know the CR manifolds have better geometry, but I think fixing the exhaust leak has made all the difference. I can tell the turbos spool sooner because more of those gases are pushing the turbo. I bet a lot of people who complain their trucks have become sluggish have this exhaust leak issues going on. It seems to really affect the low RPM velocity on the turbos. It pulls much stronger in the low RPMs when the motor is lugging along. I am very happy with the result I am seeing so far. About a 2 MPG bump in town driving, 20 MPG on the freeway easily. This is with the Lie-o-meter and not a lot of miles yet. Keep at it, it's worth the effort!
 

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I did the CRP manifolds and GT Turbos at the same time. Believe I got the first production run of manifolds. Truck sounded crazy to what it was before.
Turbos spool instantly. Couldn't be happier!

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