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I am sorry if this is posted somewhere else but I did a search and nothing came up I would like to know if anybody has or knows of someone that has done an E85 conversion on the Ecoboost. I search for it on Google and surprised that all that comes up is old talks about it not being E85 compatible straight from Ford. Just trying to figure out what steps I would need to take to make the conversion I live in South Florida and E85 is pretty accessible in my area. I have a mini Cooper S and never did the conversion on it due to the fact that I had to change all my fuel lines and then the injectors and a pile of other things to make it compatible but I am more willing to do it on my new truck and if someone has already done it I would like to get advice.

If not I guess I will be pioneering a new adventure for Ecoboosts everywhere. lol!!! ;)
 

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If I had to guess it is not so much the hardware as it is the software. I can only imagine the thousands of hours that went into tuning a turbocharged gas motor with 10:1 compression to run on 87 octane. I would think that throwing corn oil into the mix was just too much to get the truck out on time. Maybe with the next update to the motor they will have it worked out.
 

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I've done extensive research on the subject and even wrote a couple of magazine articles on when I converted my 74 Cuda. You nailed it, Jarod, the computer doesn't have the parameters to compensate for the changes in required mixture. Other factors might enter such as sufficient fuel flow capacity of the injectors, seal materials and fuel pump GPM output as well. E85 required a 147% upjet with a carburetor and the flow capacity would be similar for an injected system as well.

Don't have time right now but later on I'll copy the articles up here so you can see what I've already done. I'll link a couple other message boards where there's info too.

Back soon...
 

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I don't know if too many people would use the E85 option near me. I only know of 1 gas station that has it in my area, and it is not much less than regular gas.

SPPD
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys for the responses so far.
If I had to guess it is not so much the hardware as it is the software. I can only imagine the thousands of hours that went into tuning a turbocharged gas motor with 10:1 compression to run on 87 octane. I would think that throwing corn oil into the mix was just too much to get the truck out on time. Maybe with the next update to the motor they will have it worked out.
Thats is what I was guessing

I've done extensive research on the subject and even wrote a couple of magazine articles on when I converted my 74 Cuda. You nailed it, Jarod, the computer doesn't have the parameters to compensate for the changes in required mixture. Other factors might enter such as sufficient fuel flow capacity of the injectors, seal materials and fuel pump GPM output as well. E85 required a 147% upjet with a carburetor and the flow capacity would be similar for an injected system as well.

Don't have time right now but later on I'll copy the articles up here so you can see what I've already done. I'll link a couple other message boards where there's info too.

Back soon...
I am familiar with most of the work to be able to run E85 like up jetting. But I would love to see what you wrote in those articles looking forward to some more reading you can never have enough knowledge.:D

I don't know if too many people would use the E85 option near me. I only know of 1 gas station that has it in my area, and it is not much less than regular gas.

SPPD
I'm aware of a lot of places not having the fuel readily accessible. If I was going out of town to places I do not know I would definitely switch back to my premium tune which is extremely easily done. But the cost of the E85 at least in South Florida is almost $.60 per gallon cheaper than premium. Not for everyone but at least for me the conversion would be well worth it.
 

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Wrote this for a local blog a couple years ago...

Myths Mystics and Magic of Ethanol!

By: Mike Tritle

Since the effects of Hurricane Katrina caused gasoline prices to rocket skyward the use of ethanol as a fuel extender has not only increased overall but so has the attending controversy! Driving a 14 mile per gallon pick up truck through the after effects of the storm on a business trip I watched fuel prices jump $1.20 per gallon in just 8 hours. My curiosity was peaked and the mission was started in earnest to determine the viability of corn based ethanol as fuel for my hot rod as well as the non flex vehicles in my personal fleet.

I’ve already written several volumes on the subject of system tolerances and that is not the point of this particular article, however. Once again while perusing the internet recently, a new spate of anti ethanol sentiment has found its way to the top of the search results pages. From “facts” unproven to outright fibs, the motivation to share my research has once again hit like the results of low octane detonation on a piston top!

Most recently I came across an article speaking out against the initiative to increase ethanol content of mainstream fuel from 10% to 20%. Of all the “facts” in this article there was only one that I could agree with, that being the reduction in fuel economy with increased alcohol content. I have done a bit of testing on this and have found that any non flex vehicle will tolerate up to 40% ethanol content in fuel before triggering the dastardly MIL or Check Engine light. In nearly every case fuel economy in Miles per Gallon did suffer, however, depending on cost difference, Cost per Mile proved beneficial. This isn’t a complicated deal but it’s difficult (based on experience) for many to comprehend so I’ll save that explanation for later.

The big question due to the raft if misinformation is; won’t ethanol damage my fuel system, melt my gaskets, eat up the aluminum and deplete the food supply? If that’s true, I’m hitting the wagon cuz my Jim Beam is 40% ethanol!

The answers are this. No, no, no, no and no.

Using too much ethanol will void your warranty if a fuel system problem occurs and the system is found to contain a high percentage. The car companies are hedging their liability, that’s a fact.

The jar I filled with a high percentage denatured ethanol provided by TA/FC racer Mark Thomas is still sitting in my garage soaking a Holley power valve, needle and seat, Aeroquip hose sample, a piece of raw aluminum and some gasket material has been there since late 2005. None of the components has experienced any deterioration right up to today. Given that, I wonder how other fuel system components made of the same materials could be damaged by a lower percentage of ethanol content.

The article mentioned a high percentage of electric fuel pump failures due to moonshine content of fuel.

Recently I changed the fuel pump in my 2001 Dodge Ram 1500. This was not done due to failure but as a maintenance operation as I had the cargo box off the frame at the time. With 145,000 miles on it, to not change when it was too accessible would have been ignorant! This unit has pumped up to 85% for several thousand miles and the only effects of such “abuse” found were that the pump was clean as a whistle!

So, next time somebody tells you how bad ethanol blending will hurt your vehicle; ask them where they get their info. Bet it’s from the same sources that tell them how good the government runs itself!

More to come keep your eyes peeled here where I’ll share results on food depletion and costs along with that cost per mile thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wrote this for a local blog a couple years ago...

Myths Mystics and Magic of Ethanol!

By: Mike Tritle

Since the effects of Hurricane Katrina caused gasoline prices to rocket skyward the use of ethanol as a fuel extender has not only increased overall but so has the attending controversy! Driving a 14 mile per gallon pick up truck through the after effects of the storm on a business trip I watched fuel prices jump $1.20 per gallon in just 8 hours. My curiosity was peaked and the mission was started in earnest to determine the viability of corn based ethanol as fuel for my hot rod as well as the non flex vehicles in my personal fleet.

I’ve already written several volumes on the subject of system tolerances and that is not the point of this particular article, however. Once again while perusing the internet recently, a new spate of anti ethanol sentiment has found its way to the top of the search results pages. From “facts” unproven to outright fibs, the motivation to share my research has once again hit like the results of low octane detonation on a piston top!

Most recently I came across an article speaking out against the initiative to increase ethanol content of mainstream fuel from 10% to 20%. Of all the “facts” in this article there was only one that I could agree with, that being the reduction in fuel economy with increased alcohol content. I have done a bit of testing on this and have found that any non flex vehicle will tolerate up to 40% ethanol content in fuel before triggering the dastardly MIL or Check Engine light. In nearly every case fuel economy in Miles per Gallon did suffer, however, depending on cost difference, Cost per Mile proved beneficial. This isn’t a complicated deal but it’s difficult (based on experience) for many to comprehend so I’ll save that explanation for later.

The big question due to the raft if misinformation is; won’t ethanol damage my fuel system, melt my gaskets, eat up the aluminum and deplete the food supply? If that’s true, I’m hitting the wagon cuz my Jim Beam is 40% ethanol!

The answers are this. No, no, no, no and no.

Using too much ethanol will void your warranty if a fuel system problem occurs and the system is found to contain a high percentage. The car companies are hedging their liability, that’s a fact.

The jar I filled with a high percentage denatured ethanol provided by TA/FC racer Mark Thomas is still sitting in my garage soaking a Holley power valve, needle and seat, Aeroquip hose sample, a piece of raw aluminum and some gasket material has been there since late 2005. None of the components has experienced any deterioration right up to today. Given that, I wonder how other fuel system components made of the same materials could be damaged by a lower percentage of ethanol content.

The article mentioned a high percentage of electric fuel pump failures due to moonshine content of fuel.

Recently I changed the fuel pump in my 2001 Dodge Ram 1500. This was not done due to failure but as a maintenance operation as I had the cargo box off the frame at the time. With 145,000 miles on it, to not change when it was too accessible would have been ignorant! This unit has pumped up to 85% for several thousand miles and the only effects of such “abuse” found were that the pump was clean as a whistle!

So, next time somebody tells you how bad ethanol blending will hurt your vehicle; ask them where they get their info. Bet it’s from the same sources that tell them how good the government runs itself!

More to come keep your eyes peeled here where I’ll share results on food depletion and costs along with that cost per mile thing.
Very interesting thank you like I said I love any and all information I can get
 

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Do tell more. Pics scap? For op with tuning and a fuel pump you can run e30. Our biggest problem is injectors and the mechanicl fule pump. Ford and aftermarket are working on a pigy back fuel systom one that exists with a tune you can run e85.
 

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Wonder if the raptor will be rocking a flexfuel badge?
 

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I don't have any spacers made on a 3d printer...
I just remember seeing what looked like something posted under the LET sub forum that looked like intake runners. And Erick said they were made on a 3d printer.

But who knows...I know you guys are working on fuel is all I know and care to know. Eventually maybe something might be developed. Sure there are prototype of this and that out there. But a piggy back is the only way we'll get the fuel we need addressed.
 
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