F150 Ecoboost Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After about 35k on a set of EBC pads and EBC dimpled/slotted rotors, the pads are wore out and the rotors are worn down and also need to be replaced. The rotors really make me mad.

Any suggestions on what to try next? I tow, so I need good stopping power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
I should have taken pictures of my powerstop z36's that I had to change on Monday. Driving to work and heard a loud grinding when stopping. When I got home, I took off the tire. Outside pads on both sides looked great. Inside pad on driver's side had wore into the rotor. Got Napa's best pads and rotors.

Changed out the driver's side. Caliper seemed normal. Took apart the passenger side and I maybe had 100 miles left on the inside pad. Outside looked great. Both calipers compressed as normal.

30,000 miles on the original pads/rotors and 30,000 on the z36's. Now I'm trying to figure out if it's the calipers or brake lines. Truck seems to stop fine and I don't see any evidence of binding.

The father in laws has a 2014 he rarely drives his truck and had an issue with his inside pads wearing also.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
I'll say it up front that I don't know a lot about braking systems on these trucks, but the uneven pad wear between the "outside" and "inside" pads makes me wonder. The calipers are 4-piston, yes, in that there are pistons pushing on pads on BOTH sides of the rotor? This is kinda like the difference between a center-pull and side-pull brake setup on a bicycle. I could see uneven pad wear from a 2-piston caliper, but not from a 4-piston caliper, unless something's wrong with the pistons on the side that has more wear?

I've used rotors and pads from BrakePerformance, seem to be holding up well so far, but I've put maybe 5K miles on them...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
F150's have 2 piston calipers, unless yours is special...

I'll say it up front that I don't know a lot about braking systems on these trucks, but the uneven pad wear between the "outside" and "inside" pads makes me wonder. The calipers are 4-piston, yes, in that there are pistons pushing on pads on BOTH sides of the rotor? This is kinda like the difference between a center-pull and side-pull brake setup on a bicycle. I could see uneven pad wear from a 2-piston caliper, but not from a 4-piston caliper, unless something's wrong with the pistons on the side that has more wear?

I've used rotors and pads from BrakePerformance, seem to be holding up well so far, but I've put maybe 5K miles on them...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,605 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Does anyone have ideas on why one brake pad gets worn more than the other? Bad caliper, bad brake lines, etc...? My slides were still lubed and moved fine. Mine is a 2013 with only 60,000 miles.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Here are some pictures. I'm no auto mechanic but brakes are straight forward. Pads were correctly installed.

You can see the two pads on the left were the inner pads and the front of both rotors looked great.


Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
If the pads are wearing unevenly then either you did something wrong during installation or there is something wrong with the caliper. Especially since you have the same problem on each set

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Does anyone have ideas on why one brake pad gets worn more than the other? Bad caliper, bad brake lines, etc...? My slides were still lubed and moved fine. Mine is a 2013 with only 60,000 miles.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
With respect to single piston or dual piston same side calipers. In almost every case if you are wearing an inboard or outboard pad significantly more than it’s mate pad, it is because the caliper itself is hanging up (piston in the bore) or the caliper is not sliding effectively on the mounts. It has zero to do with the brake lines. The dark blue color on the rotor is showing excessive heat. Obviously that it is the case once the pad is gone but if the pad is hanging up you’ll get blue stripes on the rotors or marks on the rotors before the pad is actually gone. Sadly, we can’t always see what the piston bore looks like until we tear them apart. That said, you can easily inspect the caliper mounts and mounting pins/bolts. If there is corrosion on the pins or mount it will hang up in short order. These can often times be cleaned up but new bolts/slides/mounts is usually a better long term choice. The new pins will often come plated or zinc coated and will last longer than on old pin.

When it comes to corrosion inside the caliper it’s almost impossible to stop it over the life of the caliper. Frequent brake fluid changes will help but at the end of the day brake fluid attracts moisture in the air just like a magnet attracts iron. The brake fluid and water seperate inside the caliper and where the water ends up, it will leave a corrosion line that causes the piston to bind and not retract. This can be quite easily repaired during a caliper rebuild but rebuilt calipers are so cheap these days (respectively speaking) most people don’t bother rebuilding them but simply install rebuilt calipers. Calipers seem to have a mistique to many people kind of like transmissions (no a caliper isn’t in the transmission difficulty league) and seem to scare them. This shouldn’t be the case with calipers, they’re a very simple piece. Of course the more pistons you have the more complicated they become but single and dual piston calipers are not difficult to work with and rebuild kits are dirt cheap. If you have compressed air available calipers are a breeze to rebuild. There will be no doubt someone will say that compressed air can be dangerous when removing or seating a piston. I believe this is nonsense with a little bit of care, C-clamps, blocks of wood and rags this is completely safe. Once you’ve done it a couple of times it’s a 20 minute job for a caliper like is on our F150’s.

As has already been said, there are rotors and then there are rotors. The higher number the better the rotor. No rotor can survive a set of pads that have gone metal on metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
30,000 on the original brakes! Holy Bat ****! You must live in a terrible environment for brakes. I have 78,000 including 18k pulling a 7,000# travel trailer out west in the mountains and should make 100,000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,687 Posts
Here are some pictures. I'm no auto mechanic but brakes are straight forward. Pads were correctly installed.

You can see the two pads on the left were the inner pads and the front of both rotors looked great.


Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
Mine with the Z36 powerstops looked identical. Two of my caliper slide pins were stuck. Only got about 40k km on em.

New Z36 pads and had the rotors turned.

Those rotors would have been fine to have turned.

Slotted and drilled rotors aren't necessarily made to last longer. They're made to cool quicker with less fade.

Sent from my SM-G870W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
The upper rotor had a nice gouge from the inner pad grinding into the rotor. I decided to replace both sides.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,687 Posts
Did you pull the slider pins, clean the bores and re grease them? If not it will happen again.

Sent from my SM-G870W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Did you pull the slider pins, clean the bores and re grease them? If not it will happen again.

Sent from my SM-G870W using Tapatalk
I did not clean out the bores but I did clean off the pins and re grease them. If it wasn't so cold here right now, I would take them off again and do the bores.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
F150's have 2 piston calipers, unless yours is special...
So we have 2-piston calipers that are like side-pull brakes on a bicycle, in that both pistons are on the same side of the rotor (outboard), as opposed to one on each side, correct? If that's the case, I can see why the pads would wear unevenly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
Pistons inboard. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Inner and outer pads "float" in the casting that is bolted the hub. As the pistons extend one end pushes on the inner pads and the bore casting holding the outer pads pulls them into contact with the rotor. The bore casting is connected to the hub casting by the slide pins. If the pins are corroded some of the force of the pistons acting on the outer pads is used to overcome the friction resulting in less force on the outer pads, more wear on the inner pads and uneven heating of the rotor. Make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
When I did my brakes the problem I ran into was the bracket that holds the pads. It got rusty and the areas where the new hardware goes was "swollen". I could tell when I put the pads in that they didn't "float" properly. It they don't float with some movement, you will have a binding or dragging situation. If they don't float, change that bracket. Also using SS hardware helps keep that groove from getting corroded and seizing the pad. Those rotors in the photos look to me like they overheated. The pad material got too hot and spread on the rotor like butter. Once that happens you are out of luck for the rest of the pad life because excessive pad material on the rotor surface will chew up the pad. You can see in the slots how much pad material is on the rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I should have taken pictures of my powerstop z36's that I had to change on Monday. Driving to work and heard a loud grinding when stopping. When I got home, I took off the tire. Outside pads on both sides looked great. Inside pad on driver's side had wore into the rotor. Got Napa's best pads and rotors.

Changed out the driver's side. Caliper seemed normal. Took apart the passenger side and I maybe had 100 miles left on the inside pad. Outside looked great. Both calipers compressed as normal.

30,000 miles on the original pads/rotors and 30,000 on the z36's. Now I'm trying to figure out if it's the calipers or brake lines. Truck seems to stop fine and I don't see any evidence of binding.

The father in laws has a 2014 he rarely drives his truck and had an issue with his inside pads wearing also.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
I have not taken apart the front of a F150 yet but your caliper should float back and forth some on some pins. If they are not you can get uneven wear on one pad or the other. You may need to clean up and grease the mechanism so they can float.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top