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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ecoboost Noob here—Happy Thanksgiving to all!

188k on my 2011 Ecoboost, just started seeing the wrench sign. It comes and goes but when it comes boy does it come. Truck will either come to a halt, no movement even when gas applied or will only stay under 30mph no matter how much gas applied. Brought it to my mechanic who’s been servicing the truck ever since I bought it at 180k, and they can’t find anything. The wrench comes and goes, as in one day it’s there, then for three days the truck runs fine. Oil levels are good, yet nobody can figure out what’s happening. Other than that this 2-owner truck runs just fine. Had spark plugs replaced at 182k, and have been getting high synthetic oil changes on time every 1-2k. Anyone have this happen to them? Thanks in advance, hope you all enjoy this day and all days.
 

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Your truck is going into "limp mode". The computer is sensing something critical to safety, or is saving the engine or tranny from something that could be catastrophic.

There is no way to accurately tell what might be wrong without diagnostic codes. Anything that causes limp mode should be stored in the computer memory. Your mechanic (if not a dealership) should have the right scan tool (likely from SnapOn) but they might not, and thus might not be able to read stored codes from every module (there are a lot of them: PCM, TCM, BCM, SJB, ACM, etc...) . Therefore, you might want to get yourself an OBD scan tool like Forscan to read the codes when it happens.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your truck is going into "limp mode". The computer is sensing something critical to safety, or is saving the engine or tranny from something that could be catastrophic.

There is no way to accurately tell what might be wrong without diagnostic codes. Anything that causes limp mode should be stored in the computer memory. Your mechanic (if not a dealership) should have the right scan tool (likely from SnapOn) but they might not, and thus might not be able to read stored codes from every module (there are a lot of them: PCM, TCM, BCM, SJB, ACM, etc...) . Therefore, you might want to get yourself an OBD scan tool like Forscan to read the codes when it happens.

Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
Thank you for this insight. Coincidentally I bought this truck in a town 30 miles out from where I live, but the original lot it came off of us actually across the road from my house. I’ve been using my family mechanic opposer to dealership because the dealership has a bad report of ripping people off. Do you think I should try my luck there and hope they feel some sense of honor being that the truck was theirs originally or just go ahead and by my own scan tool? Thanks again, I really appreciate this. Just knowing what the problem is takes some weight off of my shoulders. This vehicle is my main mode of transportation for my wife and three small children.
 

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If you don't trust the dealership... I wouldn't take it there. They are sometimes called "Stealerships" for a reason. The only advantage is they have the OEM scan tool (called an "IDS") and can get into every nook and cranny of the computer(s). Another disadvantage is the dealership is going to charge a 1 hour diagnostic fee no matter what... (around where I live that's about $185/hour). You could buy the Forscan adapter and phone app for about $125 and own it forever, and even sell it when you are done (plenty of us on the forums that would buy it).

You could also try to go to an Auto Parts Store and see if they can read any codes... Most will do it for free.

Whenever you get the codes, post them up here... Or just Google the code and you'll usually find tons of info on the likely culprit(s).

It could be the throttle body (very common)... But before you throw money at an unknown problem and start buying and putting on random parts... The codes will be very helpful.

Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you don't trust the dealership... I wouldn't take it there. They are sometimes called "Stealerships" for a reason. The only advantage is they have the OEM scan tool (called an "IDS") and can get into every nook and cranny of the computer(s). Another disadvantage is the dealership is going to charge a 1 hour diagnostic fee no matter what... (around where I live that's about $185/hour). You could buy the Forscan adapter and phone app for about $125 and own it forever, and even sell it when you are done (plenty of us on the forums that would buy it).

You could also try to go to an Auto Parts Store and see if they can read any codes... Most will do it for free.

Whenever you get the codes, post them up here... Or just Google the code and you'll usually find tons of info on the likely culprit(s).

It could be the throttle body (very common)... But before you throw money at an unknown problem and start buying and putting on random parts... The codes will be very helpful.

Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
Wow, thank you so much!
 

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You can buy a decent Bluetooth OBDII reader and use the Windows laptop program forscan.org for $10 bucks a year. You can run the truck through all diagnostics from that program via laptop.
 
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