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Anyone ever do one on there own...just did a level kit kit on my 16 and it looks pretty easy. Took the truck for a ride after putting the leveling kit in and when I was driving straight had to have the steering wheel at 11 o'clock to go straight. Might give it a try and save me some money!

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Hmmmmmm. There's quite a bit more to alignment than just pointing straight down the road.

I'm just saying

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I did my own alignment. I only needed a couple of tools. Might be easier on my little POS though. And my tires are only $100 each lol
I say try it



 

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No offense intended but if the tools you have pictured are all that you used you did not do a proper front end alignment. You may have set the toe. The jack really throws a wrench into things when doing an alignment without some type of skid plate or tire bucket under the front tires to allow the vehicle to settle out after it’s been raised. There is nothing in the picture that takes into consideration the vehicles thrust line. I admire the ambition and you may have helped your circumstance especially with regard to the toe but you simply don‘t have what it takes here to measure camber, caster and thrust line properly laying in the driveway.

They do sell complete kits for the do-it-yourselfer that allow you to do a basic alignment they run anywhere for $100 - $500. I think you could get by with some I’ve seen but it still isn’t a magic bullet. Unfortunately the only way to know how things turned out is to look at tire wear, feel for pull and presumably checking the straightness of your steering wheel. The vehicle may not be pulling and the steering wheel may be straight but it still may be scrubbing rubber. I’m a huge do-it-yourself fan and I’ve performed thousands of alignments using high tech equipment. I’ll just leave it at this, I would not do an alignment in my garage.
 

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No offense intended but if the tools you have pictured are all that you used you did not do a proper front end alignment. You may have set the toe. The jack really throws a wrench into things when doing an alignment without some type of skid plate or tire bucket under the front tires to allow the vehicle to settle out after it’s been raised. There is nothing in the picture that takes into consideration the vehicles thrust line. I admire the ambition and you may have helped your circumstance especially with regard to the toe but you simply don‘t have what it takes here to measure camber, caster and thrust line properly laying in the driveway.
Agreed I am no way certain it is perfect. The jack is the obvious tool, I included it in the picture because I had just bought a new one. The 14 mm wrench adjusts the outer tie rods. The 3/4 inch socket loosens the camber adjustment bolt on the upper ball joint. The slip joint pliers adjusts the camber. Done, it's that simple on my 1992 2WD Ford Ranger.
I have done probably 30 adjustments and test drives to get it to where I feel it is as almost as good as a shop could do, and I saved at least $80 and I didn't have to have an idiot drive my truck around. Plus I taught myself something.
 

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i recommend maxxing out camber, going close to max on caster, setting toe to zero. nobody (especially "professionals") aligns these trucks with negative front camber, and the improvement to handling and turn-in is massive
 

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i recommend maxxing out camber, going close to max on caster, setting toe to zero. nobody (especially "professionals") aligns these trucks with negative front camber, and the improvement to handling and turn-in is massive
I think That is literally exactly what I told the shop who did the alignment in the raptor with billet and HEIM uppers by icon. Super nice


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I experienced minor to unacceptable outside edge cupping from delivery day (2014).
Upgraded to a Toyo 6 ply, still evident. After watching an alignment tech at Lee’s Tire & Services in Brunswick,ME perform an alignment ck. I had a good grasp on what was involved. Compared to the specs it was well within the range for all parameters, but still was cupping, especially P.S.. I simply gave the P.S. tie rod end 3/4 turn out to decrease the toe in. Its been 60k miles since then and new Toyos 5k ago, no uneven wear what so ever.
Kudos to Lee’s, didn't charge me a dime.
 

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I'm pretty confused as to why anyone would attempt an alignment to save $80 on a $25,000 truck, after buying $1000.00 of lift parts. They don't just drive it around, and say 'feels good, I don't hear any tires squealing'. An alignment shop uses sophisticated equipment to put your wheels in proper alignment. Why would you even think you can come close??
 
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