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Man, I've never heard of this and honestly when the guy posted that, I thought it was a joke. Good to know, I recently bought a commuter car so my truck will sit for days/weeks at a time.
 

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Man, I've never heard of this and honestly when the guy posted that, I thought it was a joke. Good to know, I recently bought a commuter car so my truck will sit for days/weeks at a time.
I thought it was a joke too the first time I read it. I read it again to make sure I read it right.
 

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I'd like to hear any reasonable theory to this. Your engine is turning over and pumping oil, yes. But its still turning over. The only difference is that its not running itself. All the wearable items in the engine are still running dry until they're seeing the oil. This isn't the same as priming an engine with oil. Am I wrong? if so, how? If it is how i think it is, this is basically useless.
 

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I'd like to hear any reasonable theory to this. Your engine is turning over and pumping oil, yes. But its still turning over. The only difference is that its not running itself. All the wearable items in the engine are still running dry until they're seeing the oil. This isn't the same as priming an engine with oil. Am I wrong? if so, how? If it is how i think it is, this is basically useless.
I would guess your right but the started probably applies less force to the parts then the motor actually firing up

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I wonder if a pre-luber/post-luber kit should be installed. It is a external 12vdc oil pump which primes the oil prior to starting and then runs for 2-3 minutes on shutdown to cool the turbos.
Tell me more about these kits. Would an F150 ecoboost have room for the pressure tank and other fittings?
 

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The unit I have installed on my motorhome has a 12vdc pump which pulls oil from the oil pan and pushes it thru the oil filter into the engine. So I do not have dry starts... Engine Guard ES800 PRE-LUBER KIT
 

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The unit I have installed on my motorhome has a 12vdc pump which pulls oil from the oil pan and pushes it thru the oil filter into the engine. So I do not have dry starts... Engine Guard ES800 PRE-LUBER KIT
I didn’t know something like that existed. Probably a good idea for motor homes that get used like twice a year. I don’t think that will lube your cylinder walls and rings. The crank spinning does that on most engines. Better then nothing if an engine sits for 6 months. I personally would forget to do the key prime. I don’t jump in my truck and think how long has it been since I started it. I also feel that today’s synthetic oils keep things lubed better then ever before. My truck rarely sits for more then 2 days so I’m good.
 

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I think this would be a good step when changing engine oil and filter
 

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I will tell you that is all useless. I don't know where you get your information from. I am a certified automotive mechanic, and heavy duty mechanic. If you were to prime your oil system by spinning the oil pump individually, then you would have something here, kind of. Its negligible at best.
 

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I will tell you that is all useless. I don't know where you get your information from. I am a certified automotive mechanic, and heavy duty mechanic. If you were to prime your oil system by spinning the oil pump individually, then you would have something here, kind of. Its negligible at best.
Because the starter motor spins the engine slower than when it's running, especially at cold idle, and there is no heat or stress on the components when the're spinning, it becomes best way to priming the oil system without tearing into the engine.
And I'll tell you, turbos love oil flowing through their bushings (I mean bearings).
If the truck sits for a length of time, it's a good idea to prime the system. I also prime mine after oil changes.
 

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I am a 67 year old registered master level Mechanical Engineer. I strive for reliability and very long life out of my engines, not higher horsepower or racing goals.

In May 2018 I received my special order 2019 model year Ford F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, 4X4 FX-4, Max Tow Package truck. I use it at Christmas for a couple of weeks and then during summers. I log over 12,000 miles a summer pulling a 6,000 travel trailer. Almost all of the miles are to or in mountain areas where we boondock. I USE my four wheel drive vehicle off-road hauling paraglider pilots up to high launches. At the end of the summer, my truck sits inside covered for many months. I use the Ford “Severe Duty” frequency for service intervals and use Mobile 1 synthetic oil exclusively.

Dry starts and long off road climbs pulling a trailer are my concerns. Using a pre-luber for pre start and hot run cool down, especially for the twin turbos is an ideal solution. Accumulators would help for dry starts,but do almost nothing for turbo cool down after a long steep grind dragging a trailer. As such, I am installing a pre-lube system (PLS). I have done the same on at least six inboard boat engines during the past 50 years….. with great engine longevity as a result.

I use the Italian made Marco UP3 oil pump. It moves a maximum of 1.4 gallons of oil per minute, at a maximum pressure of 30 PSI. I use Summit Performance Fragola 3/8” (AN6) racing hose and fittings, with a check valve in the line, and quick connects for oil changes. The lines are heat protected near exhaust and turbo’s. I draw oil from the oil pan, to the pump, check valve, quick connects, to either the oil gallery plug or a donut adapter under the oil filter.

Does anybody know of an oil gallery plug that is available on the 3.5 EcoBoost engine? Thank you.
 

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I am a 67 year old registered master level Mechanical Engineer. I strive for reliability and very long life out of my engines, not higher horsepower or racing goals.

In May 2018 I received my special order 2019 model year Ford F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, 4X4 FX-4, Max Tow Package truck. I use it at Christmas for a couple of weeks and then during summers. I log over 12,000 miles a summer pulling a 6,000 travel trailer. Almost all of the miles are to or in mountain areas where we boondock. I USE my four wheel drive vehicle off-road hauling paraglider pilots up to high launches. At the end of the summer, my truck sits inside covered for many months. I use the Ford “Severe Duty” frequency for service intervals and use Mobile 1 synthetic oil exclusively.

Dry starts and long off road climbs pulling a trailer are my concerns. Using a pre-luber for pre start and hot run cool down, especially for the twin turbos is an ideal solution. Accumulators would help for dry starts,but do almost nothing for turbo cool down after a long steep grind dragging a trailer. As such, I am installing a pre-lube system (PLS). I have done the same on at least six inboard boat engines during the past 50 years….. with great engine longevity as a result.

I use the Italian made Marco UP3 oil pump. It moves a maximum of 1.4 gallons of oil per minute, at a maximum pressure of 30 PSI. I use Summit Performance Fragola 3/8” (AN6) racing hose and fittings, with a check valve in the line, and quick connects for oil changes. The lines are heat protected near exhaust and turbo’s. I draw oil from the oil pan, to the pump, check valve, quick connects, to either the oil gallery plug or a donut adapter under the oil filter.

Does anybody know of an oil gallery plug that is available on the 3.5 EcoBoost engine? Thank you.
I don't have the answer to your question but if you do figure this out and solve it with a reasonably priced parts kit, there are probably a lot of us that would love to do the same if it's within the domain of DIY normal guy skill requirements.
 

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I'm watching!

Currently I use the starter to substitute for a legitimate pre-oiler. But I'd LOVE to fill that top end up before firing it up.

Short of a quality control shortcoming in the manufacturing process, I have cautious optimism that the current Gen2 3.5 Ecoboost is actually very well built and engineered to perform for a long time. Addressing lubrication and cooling would only add to that likelihood.

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Dunno about all the pre oil lube stuff.. My rig only sits for a couple of days at the most without running, (daily driver). When I change the oil, I fill the new, dry oil filter with oil. After a few minutes, it does not drip any oil while installing it on the engine. I do notice that the OP gauge does not move for a second or two on it's first start after that oil change. On cold starts, even after sitting a couple of days, the OP gauge moves as soon as it fires.. Don't know what that few seconds does, but so far so good just firing it up.. At least the filter was not dry when first fired! That's my only comfort at this point I guess..

On those long grade pulls and then stopping... I have those situations going east over the pass on I-90 on a couple of rest stops. What I do is coast into the parking area and then when I stop, let the engine idle for a couple of minutes... I have a phone app that monitors the ODBII sensors and I monitor the CAT temps and once they get into the 900* range, that's when I'll shut it down.

Dunno if that makes any difference at all either, but I also wait for the fans to shut off and see the engine and trans temp lower during that time, so can't hurt, right?

Good luck!

 

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Going back to the OP original problem, premature timing chain wear. I believe his dealer should go back to engine school. First, timing chains are only lubed with a minimal amount of oil even when the engine is running. Engine manufacturers are careful to make sure the majority of the oil is directed to the crankshaft bearings and camshaft, secondarily to the cylinder walls, and everything else is third. IMO, premature timing chain failure did not occur from not pre-pressurizing the oil system by turning over the engine without starting it. That is an excuse the service writer, who probably knows nothing about how an engine is oiled, came up with to push the problem on the user.

As others have said, turning over an engine with a starter or idling, it is still turning over.

Oil has this unique clinging ability to stay where it was. Once an engine has had oil through it initially, the oil film that is on the bearings, camshaft, and yes the timing chain clings in place, it does not run off.

When starting an engine, it is not starting dry, the oil is still coating all parts, including the timing chain.
 

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Dry clacking Cam Chain Phasers IS from not having enough oil and/or pressure at startup.

We can go back and forth about whether there is any benefit to pre-oiling or pre-pressurizing before igniting the motor, but no clack is better than clack. At least to my ears.

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I am a 67 year old registered master level Mechanical Engineer. I strive for reliability and very long life out of my engines, not higher horsepower or racing goals.

In May 2018 I received my special order 2019 model year Ford F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, 4X4 FX-4, Max Tow Package truck. I use it at Christmas for a couple of weeks and then during summers. I log over 12,000 miles a summer pulling a 6,000 travel trailer. Almost all of the miles are to or in mountain areas where we boondock. I USE my four wheel drive vehicle off-road hauling paraglider pilots up to high launches. At the end of the summer, my truck sits inside covered for many months. I use the Ford “Severe Duty” frequency for service intervals and use Mobile 1 synthetic oil exclusively.

Dry starts and long off road climbs pulling a trailer are my concerns. Using a pre-luber for pre start and hot run cool down, especially for the twin turbos is an ideal solution. Accumulators would help for dry starts,but do almost nothing for turbo cool down after a long steep grind dragging a trailer. As such, I am installing a pre-lube system (PLS). I have done the same on at least six inboard boat engines during the past 50 years….. with great engine longevity as a result.

I use the Italian made Marco UP3 oil pump. It moves a maximum of 1.4 gallons of oil per minute, at a maximum pressure of 30 PSI. I use Summit Performance Fragola 3/8” (AN6) racing hose and fittings, with a check valve in the line, and quick connects for oil changes. The lines are heat protected near exhaust and turbo’s. I draw oil from the oil pan, to the pump, check valve, quick connects, to either the oil gallery plug or a donut adapter under the oil filter.

Does anybody know of an oil gallery plug that is available on the 3.5 EcoBoost engine? Thank you.
A picture is worth a thousand words here. Sounds like a nice setup, care to share more?
 

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I don't have the answer to your question but if you do figure this out and solve it with a reasonably priced parts kit, there are probably a lot of us that would love to do the same if it's within the domain of DIY normal guy skill requirements.
Funny, I've gotten this before with my marine installations of the past. The 3.5 EcoBoost pre/post luber has been a real challenge every step of the way.

I'll be happy to share it as I know the benefits for both pre-lub and post cooling lube of the turbo's after a long hot/steep/heavy run. I will see the truck in late May when I begin the summer travels on the mainland. My hope is that there will be an expert on this site that can help me with the Oil Gallery Port question. There are several options, but the OGP one is the best from a performance, simplicity, and ease of installation perspective. Once I get this "Go To" issue resolved, the rest has been figured out.
 
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