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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a newb, I need to get this right. Searched here and online and I personally find it somewhat confusing.

First time I've carried this much weight and want to make sure I'm doing the math right.

GVWR=7000 lb
curb = 4740 lb
so
Max payload = 2260 lb
(rear axle = 3800 lb so not an issue)

I want to carry 1600lb product
plus 2 people (200x2)
so total p/l is 2000lb

Am I good to go?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1711lb--but that's why I asked. That seems to be the standard amount for almost every F150 spec I've seen, regardless of how it's specced out. Can't give specifics on others but that seemed to be common.
 

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2022 Powergrid KingRanch in Sparkle White
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1711lb--but that's why I asked. That seems to be the standard amount for almost every F150 spec I've seen, regardless of how it's specced out. Can't give specifics on others but that seemed to be common.
I'd be surprised if you opened the door on 10 F150's, same year model, and found the same yellow sticker Payload on any 2 of them. They'd have to be basically identical twins. (other than paint color)

The yellow sticker IS Ford doing the math for you based on the truck asbuilt on the assembly line.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And I can accept that (well, I did until I went further). Then why would the max r/a weight be 3800# ?? Shouldn't it be something substantially less?

Put 4-5 adults in the cab and you've got "spare weight" for one set of golf clubs 😉 . Seems weird.
 

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I think we are discussing 2 different things.

The Ford documentation regarding various tow capacities and Payload capacities is notoriously confusing. Even contradictory at times. But once the actual build is decided on, the yellow sticker Payload capacity IS the actual legitimate official Payload for that truck. (note: it's based on the truck having a full tank of fuel)
 

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If 1711 lb is the payload on the sticker, then that's what it is minus anything added to the truck since it came off the assemble line.

Axle weight ratings are often higher and factor in a certain amount of overage because people undoubtedly overload their trucks all the time (but doesn't mean you should, or that it's safe to do so.) The suspension, leafs, shocks, etc are designed to fail before the axle does, which could cause a catastrophic accident should the axle break.

For legal purposes, the number on the yellow sticker is what the court would use.
 

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I do have to ask, where did you get your curb weight? That seems very low. My 2015 crew with full tank of fuel and me in it is about 5400.
 

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Looks like I make two trips (y)

Thanks folks 😁
I mean, legally probably a good idea.
Mine is in the #14xx range and I've hauled twice that weight a time or 20 (concrete and black dirt up to the top of the box).
 

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The #3800 for the rear axle rating is how much just how much weight you can put on the 2 rear wheels if you scaled just them. It's probably got some #1500+ on them just sitting empty.

If you are just getting this load at the local home store and it's only a couple of miles away and take city streets, I'd just load it up and get it home...

If it's on a pallet, have them try to get them to move it as far forward towards the cab as you can, so that will help distribute the weight to the front of the truck as well..

Max out the PSI on the tires and just take it easy... If you have to go many miles or at hwy speeds, 2 trips might be a better idea.

Good luck! Mitch
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The #3800 for the rear axle rating is how much just how much weight you can put on the 2 rear wheels if you scaled just them. It's probably got some #1500+ on them just sitting empty.

If you are just getting this load at the local home store and it's only a couple of miles away and take city streets, I'd just load it up and get it home...

If it's on a pallet, have them try to get them to move it as far forward towards the cab as you can, so that will help distribute the weight to the front of the truck as well..

Max out the PSI on the tires and just take it easy... If you have to go many miles or at hwy speeds, 2 trips might be a better idea.

Good luck! Mitch
It's 37 boxes (4' long so fits in short box bed) of hardwood flooring at 1600 lb (and 2 occupants) and about 12 miles on back country paved roads.

I'll have to think about it but it's no biggie to do this in 2 trips in any case (y)

ps It's a half ton (F150) so the two trip method is the right one 😁
 

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I can't find the figure I quoted but a re-search for a lightly optioned SCC (302a & 7000#) gives me for 2015-2020:
My 2020 crew 302a XLT with a full tank weighs 4890 according to the scale at my local landfill.
It does show how quickly options on these add up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Even if I take some weight off the rear axle by moving a bunch o' boxes to the rear seat floor, I'll still be over.

Two trips will be the route I take (y)

Another point to consider: I just realized I don't really have the room to store 37 boxes in the house. All the above may be for nought if I just do one room at a time and buy per room as needed.

Sometimes, whole house refurbishing all-at-once is not the route to take.
 
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