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Just bought an "11" F150 Platinum with 130,000 on it. The only mods I am aware of is aftermarket wheels and tires. Not sure of the size off the top of my head but nothing crazy as it is stock height. I am new to ford truck's and the ecoboost engine. Truck runs great but I am only seeing 12-14 mpg highway. The tires are part of the cause for that but truthfully I am just wondering "from actual truck owners", what I should be looking for along the lines of potential problems and what would you recommend doing to or checking on the truck to keep problems away. Any info is appreciated. Thank you.
 

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You may want to look into what your speedometer is calibrated for. When I went from 275/65r18 to 275/70r18 i didn’t have my speedometer reset. So I just make sure to keep in mind in addition to the hit I took for going with a much heavier E range tire I’m also looking at ~3.5-4% undervaluation of fuel milage. So not a huge change but some.


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Thank you for that. I do know the Speedo is not calibrated for the tires currently on the truck. It's almost a 5mph slower reading than what the truck is actually going. I didn't think about that affecting the mpg reading that the truck was indicating.
 

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May I ask the size of tire on it? (I know you said you didn’t know off the top of your head but are we talking like 33s or 35s). I only went from a 32-33 because of availability but I’d imagine if it’s a nice lift and such it’ll be a bigger gap than I’m
seeing.

Another thing I notice is my truck in particular gets better milage with straight gasoline than E10 to about the tube of 1 mpg. I’m not sure if this is a thing others see or just mine in particular and I’ve never looked into it close enough to see if the cost jump between the two is better or worse than the milage hit.

Edit: spelling

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You went from 32" to 34". The new tires are slow by 4 mph at 50 and 5 mph at 60.
 

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12-14 on those tires sounds about right. When I bought my truck it had 305/60r18s. It showed 13mpg on the dash I replaced them with 275/70r18 (super duty size so always available and not that expensive). I average between 16.5 and 17.4mpg and my speedometer is correct (never adjusted) had it verified by GPS and Police radar. I’ve heard Ford speedos are off 2-3mph from the factory. Swap to a narrow but tall tire, that should help with rolling resistance.
 

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My speedo was off by 3-4 mph with stock size P275/65-18. Stealership says it is right on now with LT275/70-18.
 

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Welcome to DNA_Dan's "10 Things you should know about your first generation F150 Ecoboost" !!!!!!!!!!!!

1) ALWAYS, always, always change the oil with a Motorcraft filter. Don't just take your truck to Jiffy lube and install filter "X". Most run a good full synthetic or the Motorcraft blended synthetic.

2) Drill a weep hole in the intercooler and consider buying a catch can or do both. These CACs are really condensing machines. If you ingest that moisture into your motor, it will crack your spark plugs and can zap coils. You really don't want to go down the path of "my truck is stumbling on acceleration" or "I have misfires." So do yourself a favor and read up on the moisture issues with the intercooler and fuel dilution/moisture in the motor from the anemic PCV system on these trucks.

3) Listen to your motor closely at startup after a cold soak. If it sounds like a rattling can of spray paint, change the oil and see if it improves. If it doesn't and keeps coming back, start looking at the cam phaser/timing chain replacement threads. This is a fairly expensive repair, ranging from 2000-3500 USD. If you are mechanically inclined, it can be done with the right tools and more thoroughly for about 1200 USD.

4) If you hear a chirping sound on acceleration or "crickets", this is a good indication you have a leaking exhaust manifold. These are known to warp from getting too hot. They are not properly engineered with enough studs on the head. If you can afford it, replace them with the CR Performance Engineering ones. I haven't seen a single report of these giving anyone issues once installed. An exhaust leak robs the air which pushes the turbos, so you may be making less boost.

5) The push in "jiffy-tite" fittings on the block and turbo are notorious for leaking. The O-ring inside shrinks a bit or dirt gets wiggled in there from motor movement and they leak. These are primarily coolant lines, but there is also an oil feed tube which uses an all metal gasket at the turbo which can leak as well. Some of these leaks due to cheap fittings and connections will run you up to 1K per side to replace at a dealer. Find a good independent mechanic for this stuff or do it yourself. Also, the coolant reservoir has an elbow at the bottom going towards the motor which is notorious for leaking. There is an aftermarket kit made to turn this connection into a regular 90 degree hose with a hose clamp. I mention it because some people see coolant under their trucks and assume it's these turbo fittings. Really the issue is this reservoir connection above dripping on the lower part of the motor.

6) If you tow, swap out the transmission cooler in the front to the larger one. They are only about $90 and your transmission will thank you. When towing and pulling grades don't lug the motor in high gears, that will keep you in boost and get the motor very hot very quickly. This is called heat soak, when the motor is hot and the air the turbos are pumping into it is even hotter. It's like a continual feed back loop that will lead to hotter and hotter temps. What you want to do when pulling grades is slow down and drop down a gear so your RPMs are over 2000-2500. This will lower the amount of boost pushing heat into the motor, but will work your transmission harder. This is where the larger trans cooler gives you some overhead to be able to do this. Many people have tried to combat hot trucks and overheating with aftermarket radiators, intercoolers, thermostats, etc. The verdict is there is really no one fix for this issue, but a combination of things. Again, there are several threads about hot trucks and overheating. You can spend a small fortune going down this rabbit hole, so I'd start with the trans cooler, (cheap and easy to install) and try changing your driving habits a bit. The deal with the stock tune is it will try to stay in boost as long as it can, then downshift. Which is typically too late and you're already too hot. So preempt hills when towing by slowing down and dropping it down manually.

7) If you feel a "bump" when just coming to a stop, this is the slip yoke. It will feel like someone kissed your bumper from behind. Take the drive shaft out and lube up the splines inside the yoke. The coating in there is insufficient and can bind. If this doesn't fix it you may need to replace the driveshaft with the updated coating.

8) There was recently a recall on the speed sensor inside the transmission. The speed sensor goes erratic, sends a few 0 mph signals to the PCM and the transmission locks up because it's not supposed to be spinning. This is very dangerous if you're say on the freeway going 80 MPH. The recall involves a reflash to the PCM so that it ignores an occasional misread by the speed sensor. If you haven't had this update done, I would check with a dealer. Again, they don't replace the failing sensor, just reflash the PCM to ignore it more. If you have the reflash done and still have intermittent downshifting problems, then the lead frame on the transmission (which includes this sensor) needs to be replaced. There is an extended warranty for people who continue to see this issue after the reflash, but again, get it checked out.

9) If you hear a "crunching" sound from up front, worse when turning, it's the IWE's in the front hubs being partially engaged. Typically putting it in 4wd will make the sound go away, this will identify the problem. A vacuum is held on them when you're driving to keep them open, so the fault could be an air leak or pinched hose going to the IWE. When you put it in 4wd the vacuum disables, and the hubs lock. If good vacuum is confirmed, the issue is the IWE itself.

10) If you hear a "scraping" sound, metal on metal, this is most likely a turbo impeller hitting the housing and a turbo is toast. This could be from lack of lubrication from the motor oil, a foreign object in the intake tract took out the vanes or just age related. They do wear out. There's lot of replacement options from full turbos to just the cores to aftermarket performance ones. These cost about $700-1000 each plus labor to install.

Bonus Tip!!!!

Finally, I personally don't go by Ford's schedule for fluid maintenance changes. If it were my truck, I would change all the fluids in it - trans, diffs, transfer case, oil, etc. to start with all new so you know where you're at when things go bad.
 

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Welcome to DNA_Dan's "10 Things you should know about your first generation F150 Ecoboost" !!!!!!!!!!!!

1) ALWAYS, always, always change the oil with a Motorcraft filter. Don't just take your truck to Jiffy lube and install filter "X". Most run a good full synthetic or the Motorcraft blended synthetic.

2) Drill a weep hole in the intercooler and consider buying a catch can or do both. These CACs are really condensing machines. If you ingest that moisture into your motor, it will crack your spark plugs and can zap coils. You really don't want to go down the path of "my truck is stumbling on acceleration" or "I have misfires." So do yourself a favor and read up on the moisture issues with the intercooler and fuel dilution/moisture in the motor from the anemic PCV system on these trucks.

3) Listen to your motor closely at startup after a cold soak. If it sounds like a rattling can of spray paint, change the oil and see if it improves. If it doesn't and keeps coming back, start looking at the cam phaser/timing chain replacement threads. This is a fairly expensive repair, ranging from 2000-3500 USD. If you are mechanically inclined, it can be done with the right tools and more thoroughly for about 1200 USD.

4) If you hear a chirping sound on acceleration or "crickets", this is a good indication you have a leaking exhaust manifold. These are known to warp from getting too hot. They are not properly engineered with enough studs on the head. If you can afford it, replace them with the CR Performance Engineering ones. I haven't seen a single report of these giving anyone issues once installed. An exhaust leak robs the air which pushes the turbos, so you may be making less boost.

5) The push in "jiffy-tite" fittings on the block and turbo are notorious for leaking. The O-ring inside shrinks a bit or dirt gets wiggled in there from motor movement and they leak. These are primarily coolant lines, but there is also an oil feed tube which uses an all metal gasket at the turbo which can leak as well. Some of these leaks due to cheap fittings and connections will run you up to 1K per side to replace at a dealer. Find a good independent mechanic for this stuff or do it yourself. Also, the coolant reservoir has an elbow at the bottom going towards the motor which is notorious for leaking. There is an aftermarket kit made to turn this connection into a regular 90 degree hose with a hose clamp. I mention it because some people see coolant under their trucks and assume it's these turbo fittings. Really the issue is this reservoir connection above dripping on the lower part of the motor.

6) If you tow, swap out the transmission cooler in the front to the larger one. They are only about $90 and your transmission will thank you. When towing and pulling grades don't lug the motor in high gears, that will keep you in boost and get the motor very hot very quickly. This is called heat soak, when the motor is hot and the air the turbos are pumping into it is even hotter. It's like a continual feed back loop that will lead to hotter and hotter temps. What you want to do when pulling grades is slow down and drop down a gear so your RPMs are over 2000-2500. This will lower the amount of boost pushing heat into the motor, but will work your transmission harder. This is where the larger trans cooler gives you some overhead to be able to do this. Many people have tried to combat hot trucks and overheating with aftermarket radiators, intercoolers, thermostats, etc. The verdict is there is really no one fix for this issue, but a combination of things. Again, there are several threads about hot trucks and overheating. You can spend a small fortune going down this rabbit hole, so I'd start with the trans cooler, (cheap and easy to install) and try changing your driving habits a bit. The deal with the stock tune is it will try to stay in boost as long as it can, then downshift. Which is typically too late and you're already too hot. So preempt hills when towing by slowing down and dropping it down manually.

7) If you feel a "bump" when just coming to a stop, this is the slip yoke. It will feel like someone kissed your bumper from behind. Take the drive shaft out and lube up the splines inside the yoke. The coating in there is insufficient and can bind. If this doesn't fix it you may need to replace the driveshaft with the updated coating.

8) There was recently a recall on the speed sensor inside the transmission. The speed sensor goes erratic, sends a few 0 mph signals to the PCM and the transmission locks up because it's not supposed to be spinning. This is very dangerous if you're say on the freeway going 80 MPH. The recall involves a reflash to the PCM so that it ignores an occasional misread by the speed sensor. If you haven't had this update done, I would check with a dealer. Again, they don't replace the failing sensor, just reflash the PCM to ignore it more. If you have the reflash done and still have intermittent downshifting problems, then the lead frame on the transmission (which includes this sensor) needs to be replaced. There is an extended warranty for people who continue to see this issue after the reflash, but again, get it checked out.

9) If you hear a "crunching" sound from up front, worse when turning, it's the IWE's in the front hubs being partially engaged. Typically putting it in 4wd will make the sound go away, this will identify the problem. A vacuum is held on them when you're driving to keep them open, so the fault could be an air leak or pinched hose going to the IWE. When you put it in 4wd the vacuum disables, and the hubs lock. If good vacuum is confirmed, the issue is the IWE itself.

10) If you hear a "scraping" sound, metal on metal, this is most likely a turbo impeller hitting the housing and a turbo is toast. This could be from lack of lubrication from the motor oil, a foreign object in the intake tract took out the vanes or just age related. They do wear out. There's lot of replacement options from full turbos to just the cores to aftermarket performance ones. These cost about $700-1000 each plus labor to install.

Bonus Tip!!!!

Finally, I personally don't go by Ford's schedule for fluid maintenance changes. If it were my truck, I would change all the fluids in it - trans, diffs, transfer case, oil, etc. to start with all new so you know where you're at when things go bad.
Can we make this a sticky?? When I first got my truck this would have been great as a starting point


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@DNA Dan Really appreciate that long very helpful post (y)(y)(y)
 

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Dan's post covers just about everything a new ecoboost truck owner would need to know.

I would also install a fresh set of spark plugs and boots, along with all new fluids in the radiator, trans, diff's etc. That way you know its all done and when it will need to be done again. Lots of good info on this site.
 

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Dan can post some doozies.
He's a Gen1 newbies treasure chest
Hardly.. Just sharing what I picked up from others on this site. I figure I either need to get into the office more or slow down on my coffee intake! :coffee::coffee::coffee::coffee::coffee: Hope it's not sticker shock to the newbs, but complicated engineering sometimes requires complicated upkeep/knowledge.
 
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