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Hey everybody,


Mishimoto is excited to announce that we're starting development for a 2015-2017 F-150 transmission cooler! Check out the first post below and feel free to share any feedback!


Carry the Weight — Transmission Cooler R&D, Part 1: Stock Review



Ford’s F-150 is a staple of jobsites around the world and apparently a staple of this blog. It seems we never run out of projects for the F-150 and with thirteen generations to choose from, it’s unlikely we ever will. Our latest endeavor into the F-150 platform focuses on the 2015-2017 model-year transmission coolers.


On top of the multitude of F-150 posts living on our blog, you’ll find a wealth of posts about truck transmission coolers. For some reason, truck manufacturers tend to underestimate the importance of their vehicles’ transmission coolers. Stock coolers on many trucks are often too small to cool the transmission fluid during long periods of heavy towing, have some major flaw that causes catastrophic failure, or manufacturers don’t include one at all.





In the case of the 2015-2017 F-150, trucks equipped with certain tow packages did receive an external transmission cooler. While that cooler may work for many owners, those who tow in hot environments or have modified their F-150 to tow heavier loads have found the stock transmission cooler to be inadequate. So, we tore into the front of our 2015 F-150 to see how we could make it better.





Even though the grille of the F-150 is almost as big as she is, our engineer was able to quickly gain access to the F-150’s cooling stack. We weren’t surprised to find a transmission cooler that could benefit from the Mishimoto touch.


Extending across the entire radiator is a massive plastic mount that houses the stock transmission cooler. Instead of using all the available space, Ford elected to make their cooler only about half the length of the mount. This choice was likely made to reduce cost in production, and therefore reduce costs for the end consumer. After all, a huge portion of Ford’s F-150 customer base couldn’t care less if their truck came with a transmission cooler at all.





But since you’re reading this, we’re assuming you do care if you have a transmission cooler. And, you probably care if that transmission cooler actually cools your transmission. You care that your F-150 can carry the weight. And so do we. We’ll be spending the next few months making a cooler that better utilizes the space behind the grille and provides more than enough cooling for any grade or trailer your F-150 comes across.


We anticipate that this project will be simple. Unlike many trans coolers we’ve recently worked on, we were happy to see the stock transmission lines are connected to simple hose barbs on the cooler. That means no stubborn quick-disconnects or odd connectors that require complicated adapters and lines. The mounting will also be relatively easy; we can likely utilize the factory mounting locations.





We will face some tough decisions on the core itself, however. The stock transmission cooler core is a stacked-plate construction, which makes it tough and durable. But, a stacked-plate cooler may pose too much restriction to the transmission fluid when the core is extended across a larger area. We’ll have to test both stacked-plate and tube-and-fin cores to see which design strikes the best balance between flow and cooling.


Before any testing can happen though, we’ll need samples to test. And before that, a model to build those samples from. And before anything, we’ll need measurements and the help of our fabricators to build a prototype. So, keep an eye out for the next updates where we’ll go through each step of our process in making this 2015-2017 F-150 transmission cooler.


Feel free to give us your feedback and ask any questions you may have in the meantime.


Thanks for reading!
-Steve
 

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Hey everybody,


Mishimoto is excited to announce that we're starting development for a 2015-2017 F-150 transmission cooler! Check out the first post below and feel free to share any feedback!


Carry the Weight — Transmission Cooler R&D, Part 1: Stock Review



Ford’s F-150 is a staple of jobsites around the world and apparently a staple of this blog. It seems we never run out of projects for the F-150 and with thirteen generations to choose from, it’s unlikely we ever will. Our latest endeavor into the F-150 platform focuses on the 2015-2017 model-year transmission coolers.


On top of the multitude of F-150 posts living on our blog, you’ll find a wealth of posts about truck transmission coolers. For some reason, truck manufacturers tend to underestimate the importance of their vehicles’ transmission coolers. Stock coolers on many trucks are often too small to cool the transmission fluid during long periods of heavy towing, have some major flaw that causes catastrophic failure, or manufacturers don’t include one at all.





In the case of the 2015-2017 F-150, trucks equipped with certain tow packages did receive an external transmission cooler. While that cooler may work for many owners, those who tow in hot environments or have modified their F-150 to tow heavier loads have found the stock transmission cooler to be inadequate. So, we tore into the front of our 2015 F-150 to see how we could make it better.





Even though the grille of the F-150 is almost as big as she is, our engineer was able to quickly gain access to the F-150’s cooling stack. We weren’t surprised to find a transmission cooler that could benefit from the Mishimoto touch.


Extending across the entire radiator is a massive plastic mount that houses the stock transmission cooler. Instead of using all the available space, Ford elected to make their cooler only about half the length of the mount. This choice was likely made to reduce cost in production, and therefore reduce costs for the end consumer. After all, a huge portion of Ford’s F-150 customer base couldn’t care less if their truck came with a transmission cooler at all.





But since you’re reading this, we’re assuming you do care if you have a transmission cooler. And, you probably care if that transmission cooler actually cools your transmission. You care that your F-150 can carry the weight. And so do we. We’ll be spending the next few months making a cooler that better utilizes the space behind the grille and provides more than enough cooling for any grade or trailer your F-150 comes across.


We anticipate that this project will be simple. Unlike many trans coolers we’ve recently worked on, we were happy to see the stock transmission lines are connected to simple hose barbs on the cooler. That means no stubborn quick-disconnects or odd connectors that require complicated adapters and lines. The mounting will also be relatively easy; we can likely utilize the factory mounting locations.





We will face some tough decisions on the core itself, however. The stock transmission cooler core is a stacked-plate construction, which makes it tough and durable. But, a stacked-plate cooler may pose too much restriction to the transmission fluid when the core is extended across a larger area. We’ll have to test both stacked-plate and tube-and-fin cores to see which design strikes the best balance between flow and cooling.


Before any testing can happen though, we’ll need samples to test. And before that, a model to build those samples from. And before anything, we’ll need measurements and the help of our fabricators to build a prototype. So, keep an eye out for the next updates where we’ll go through each step of our process in making this 2015-2017 F-150 transmission cooler.


Feel free to give us your feedback and ask any questions you may have in the meantime.


Thanks for reading!
-Steve
Will this be compatible with 2017 Gen2 3.5 non-raptor?

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The cooler pictured above does not come with any 2018 truck equipped with the 10 speed. Only the normally aspirated 3.x with a tow package has such a cooler.

Ford has equipped the 2.7, 3.5, & 5.0 with a water/transfluid cooler mounted in front of the 40-speed, regardless of tow or Payload capacity.

Not sure about 17's

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my 2016 wants one of these. Doesn't a stacked plate cooler flow better than a tube and fin? the tube and fin is most efficient at the cost of increased restrictive pressure. Each plate flows fluid from one side to the other, whereas a tube and fin is a single long tube. My understanding is the more plates it has, the lower the restriction. A long single tube is most restrictive...or am I miss-informed.
 

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Ford has equipped the 2.7, 3.5, & 5.0 with a water/transfluid cooler mounted in front of the 40-speed,


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Where do you get one of these 40 speeds? :eek:
 

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Oooops
10 could be argued as too many.
So yea, forbid.

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Had to rib you before someone else did.
 

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Sub to this thread!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
my 2016 wants one of these. Doesn't a stacked plate cooler flow better than a tube and fin? the tube and fin is most efficient at the cost of increased restrictive pressure. Each plate flows fluid from one side to the other, whereas a tube and fin is a single long tube. My understanding is the more plates it has, the lower the restriction. A long single tube is most restrictive...or am I miss-informed.
Flow/restriction depends more on the tube sizing and internal structure than the construction style. Many stacked plate coolers use turbulated internal structures that move the fluid throughout the plate. This gets more of the fluid in contact with the surface of the plate to transfer heat, but it can also cause a restriction if the tubes are too small. Tube-and-fin coolers are typically less thermally efficient than stacked-plate-coolers, but you have more room to increase the diameter of the tubes and increase flow. Adding more plates or more tubes to either construction would theoretically reduce restriction, but the inlet and outlet will become a bottle-neck at some point.

Hope that answers your question! Feel free to let me know if it didn't :)

Sub to this thread!
Thanks!

-Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey everybody,


I hope you all had a great Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year, Lunar Eclipse.... It's been a while. We have an update on this transmission cooler for you! Check it out below and let us know what you think!


Carry the Weight – Transmission Cooler R&D, Part 2: Design


Simplicity is often the key to great engineering. The same can be said about Ford’s F-150. The F-150 is about function over frills and getting the job done. Our 2015+ Ford F-150 transmission cooler will follow the same formula. Our focus will be on one key aspect: use as much of the space behind the F-150’s grille as possible. As we saw in our first post, the stock transmission cooler only utilizes about 50% of the available space. To increase that usage to 100% without adding unnecessary complications is where we’ll get the job done, plain and simple.



Ford was kind enough to provide us with convenient mounting points on either end of the radiator and a hard pipe to connect the outlet port on the transmission cooler to the soft line going to the radiator. Our cooler needed another hard line to travel the additional distance from the original soft line to our end tank but compared to some of our recent transmission cooler project, that was be a simple task. To continue with the theme of simplicity, our cooler will be fastened to the radiator by a straightforward set of L-brackets.


We still need to decide whether the core will be a tube-and-fin style or bar-and-plate style, but before anything else can happen, we need to make a prototype. Before we can build a prototype, we need a 3D model to base it on.


Continue Reading...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey everybody,

We're excited to announce that our pre-sale for this transmission cooler is live and we have our final post outlining performance and fitment testing below. Check them both out, and let us know what you think!

Thanks,
-Steve


Carry the Weight — Transmission Cooler R&D, Part 3: Production


The time had come to put our engineer’s hard work to the test, a bench test to be specific. The bench test determines if our final transmission cooler will be a stacked-plate or tube-and-fin design. Given the fact that our cooler is over double the size of the stock cooler, we’re confident that either construction will cool better, but the devil is in the details. Aside from the cooling performance of each construction method, we needed to consider the pressure drop across each. The cooling performance of the stacked-plate cooler might be better than a tube-and-fin cooler, but if the pressure drop is too high, it will all be for nothing. To settle the debate once and for all we set up our bench-test rig and got to work.

You may be wondering why we’re bench testing the coolers instead of road testing them. Road testing coolers is great for getting real world data when you can perform it on a closed course without traffic and with perfectly consistent weather. But, since we don’t have access to a closed course for testing and we’re no good at controlling the weather, we’ve opted for bench testing. Our bench test is designed to give us an apples-to-apples comparison between all three coolers. We can control the ambient air temperature in our shop, the airflow through the cooler with our dyno fan, and maintain a consistent fluid temperature and pressure. All that data can then be easily collected by our AEM AQ1 data-logger without having to worry about other parts of the vehicle’s cooling system interfering.

Continue Reading...
 

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I typically don't have issues with transmission temps but do with coolant temps, will this help is that regard?

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Discussion Starter #17
I typically don't have issues with transmission temps but do with coolant temps, will this help is that regard?
It may reduce coolant temps slightly due to the reduced load on the cooling system, but if you're having cooling issues, our radiator would be a better investment.

So this fits the 2017 raptor 3.5 but does not fit the 2017 Non Raptor Gen2 3.5?
This will fit the non-raptor 2017 3.5L EcoBoost. It will not fit the 2018 models with the 3.5L except for the Raptor.

Thanks!
-Steve
 

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Will you make a version that has the tubes flipped upwards for a regular 2015-2019 F150?
 

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