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Discussion Starter #201
So guys, I was digging more around the internet preparing for the turbo install, found something interesting and pulled the trigger.

These are Ford stainless steel manifold studs, Part W703902-S403. They come up as part numbers for a 5.4 3v I believe and were used on these engines under warranty. Apparently those engines studs would crumble like paper. Ford parts list these at the same thread pitch as our stock ones. On top of all that, I found someone (theyre on this forum) that had already installed these on his Eco. SO it should work and I ordered them!

They look almost copper, but I think that is a antisieze like coating. I tested them on a strong magnet, no pick up. The stock ones shot right to it.

Why use these? Better material, will handle heat cycling better and in 100k miles they should pop right out right out without any issue. Although i spoke with three members and they had no problem removing our stock ones, provided they're not at 100k. As some of you may know, the stock back cylinders (5 and 6) with the two studs only, have potential problems breaking with high miles and thats when people hear the cricket (exhaust leak) on cold driving. That bolt is behind the turbo and tucked behind the manifold, subject to a lot of heat. Hopefully these would last better to that heat too.

bolt manifold.jpg

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So guys, I was digging more around the internet preparing for the turbo install, found something interesting and pulled the trigger.

These are Ford stainless steel manifold studs, Part W703902-S403. They come up as part numbers for a 5.4 3v I believe and were used on these engines under warranty. Apparently those engines studs would crumble like paper. Ford parts list these at the same thread pitch as our stock ones. On top of all that, I found someone (theyre on this forum) that had already installed these on his Eco. SO it should work and I ordered them!

They look almost copper, but I think that is a antisieze like coating. I tested them on a strong magnet, no pick up. The stock ones shot right to it.

Why use these? Better material, will handle heat cycling better and in 100k miles they should pop right out right out without any issue. Although i spoke with three members and they had no problem removing our stock ones, provided they're not at 100k. As some of you may know, the stock back cylinders (5 and 6) with the two studs only, have potential problems breaking with high miles and thats when people hear the cricket (exhaust leak) on cold driving. That bolt is behind the turbo and tucked behind the manifold, subject to a lot of heat. Hopefully these would last better to that heat too.

View attachment 159620

View attachment 159622

View attachment 159624
Very interesting !


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When I pulled apart my old international 345 they used these copper plated studs/ bolts on the exhaust manifolds and the 8 capacrews close to the exhaust crossover in the manifolds. So it's not new technology.
 

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Discussion Starter #204
When I pulled apart my old international 345 they used these copper plated studs/ bolts on the exhaust manifolds and the 8 capacrews close to the exhaust crossover in the manifolds. So it's not new technology.
Ya, but auto manufacturers will save money where ever possible. These studs are only a dollar more then the iron ones online. Even though they know their studs have been a problem in the past, they still don't put them in newer.
 

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Ya, but auto manufacturers will save money where ever possible. These studs are only a dollar more then the iron ones online. Even though they know their studs have been a problem in the past, they still don't put them in newer.
Yep.
They'll warranty a longblock with busted piston skirts and on the next revision of the same motor they'll STILL budget $3.50 for a piston. (3,000,000 piston order economy of scale) I can't prove it, but at that scale a forged piston CAN'T cost that much.

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I am pulling parts together for a GT install as well. Turbos and SPD adapters get here next week, so by the time I have all the small parts I should be looking at end of September as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #212
Full disclosure, I am paying my friend for the shop usage and paying an additional Ford tech(he knows?) for the work so we can hopefully get it done in 4 hrs or so (hopefully!) Tag team each side, lol don't modify daily drivers......

They wanted to pull the cab but I said no. There is enough room. My buddy is really freaking out that studs are going to break and I will have to leave it, so they want to pull the cab. Only studs I see broken are the back one behind the turbo and if it is not broken going in (it is not) it should not break taking it out. That being said I am buying a extractor kit on amazon before going and returning after, unless we need it.
 

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Sounds like a good plan. I am not removing or replacing my manifolds, and I have had my downpipes off a few times in the past year so I am not super worried about breaking bolts. I am planning on replacing all the vaccum lines at the same time so I am blocking out a day, possibly including a long night if necessary, to get it done. After the turbos I need to address the rust.
 

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Woo - have you considered the difference in thermal expansion of the stainless steel vs the regular steel bolts? If it expands LESS, I could see a situation where the studs will have higher than normal stress on them because of the expanding aluminum head. One would think the strength of the stainless would overcome this difference, but it really depends on what type of stainless the stud is made of.

I would think those studs need to stretch for it to expand with the block/head.
 

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Discussion Starter #216
I think it will be fine. the 5.4 is alum heads, all mod motors are. But for example Info I have found online for the 5.4 the studs have stated 8ft-lbs or 15ft-lbs and the nuts 18ft-lbs. For ecoboost, the stud is listed as 15 ft lb and nut 18ft lbs. These are therefore very similar.
 

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Discussion Starter #217
-Parts = Ford Turbo kit, SPD ported exhaust adapters and CR manifolds. STOCK EXHAUST.
-Manifolds and heat shield that attach to turbos, 2000 degree ceracoat
-All new gaskets are included with Ford kit, I additionally purchased 2 block jiffy tite fittings and manifold to block gaskets
-Day started with me getting up at 530, packing truck, leaving at 615 and arriving at 8am at friends shop with lift.
I worked by myself from 8 to 10 am, taking out fender liners, unhooking turbo plastic pipes while waiting for engine to cool down
-10 am started work, pulled all intercooler and intake pipes out completely from truck.
-Drained coolant(very easy, 14 is the last year with pet cock on passenger side and it has nipple. Hooked up plastic tube to drain directly into container)
-Began tearing turbo apart, everything was smooth.
-All exhaust studs came out fine, zero issues. I used stock steel ones and not the 5.4 stainless ones btw. For sale.
-The studs that broke, one on each side, were the 3 holding the turbo to the manifold. One broke each side. We weren’t afraid to take a pipe on the wrench and snap the bolts if it happened because we were replacing. The heads snapped off leaving a lot of stud exposed so it would "easier" to remove broken if this happens to you
-Lube o rings in jiffy tite and end of hard lines on coolant etc so it goes in smooth. I just used some lithium grease that was around the shop and some 10-40 oil
-I should also mention, the Ford kit comes with new bolts and o ring for the oil drain tube at the block, we did not replace these and I have never seen anyone online do these.
-The manifold gaskets and turbo to exhaust adapter gasket-we sprayed a copper tack on these before hand to help seal.
-As I posted, I bought stainless 5.4 3v (with copper coating?) manifold studs. I ultimately ended up not using these due to stock ones coming out so easy and these stock ones not having corrosion issues typically. I figured lets stick with what it is
-We also followed proper pattern to tighten manifold down, but did not use the mentioned torque spec. We used a 1/4 wrench and tighten down pretty tight. As mentioned before, getting socket on nut with CR manifolds is a challenge, need to grind down for thin wall or hit the socket on and youll be fine. THe CR should really help with the opened port. I noticed on stock you could see part of black circle where it was hitting the metal and not flowing directly into opening.
-The gasket that goes between turbo and manifold I got from Ford with the turbo kit, did not have that side prongs like stock and everyone I have seen on line that grip onto metal so you don't have to hold the gasket while installing. It was weird but they still work fine.
PROBLEMS
-Even though I purchased jiffy-tite fitting for the block, we did not replace upfront, only if issue we decided. This was a mistake. Order these and replace when turbos are out.
-After hooking everything up, except downpipe, we went to fill the coolant by using vacuum. This puts cap on expansion tank, pulls vacuum with air hooked up then fills system. With this, no burping is needed because all air is out of system. Upon turning air on, we immediately heard a hissing noise. It was determined the hissing was coming from passenger side jiffy tite fitting in the block. In order to get to this, we had to pull turbo back off (hoping gasket is ok) and lines. That fitting is behind the ac compressor. To remove this, we had to remove belt and remove stretch belt (hassle, hand turn crank while pulling/wedging belt), then blindly taking bolts off ac compressor.
-Pull the bracket hard line and then fitting, looking at hard line from bracket, the raised groove edge was not even in the jiffy tite fitting from the factory? We can tell because there is a wear line through the black paint of the hard line and it was way in front of the raised groove edge (sorry no pics). This means the 3 prongs on the jiffy tite was not seated holding the line in, as the 3 grooves are supposed to lock around this edge, the only thing holding this into the fitting was the bracket bolted down pushing it in. I don't know if this is normal? We thought it wasn't so we bent the bracket so the groove would seat all the way into the jiffy-tite 3 prongs.
-Last part to do, is the coolant hard line at top of turbo. It would not seat back into the jiffy-tite although we got it so smoothly the first time. We fucked around with this for at least 1.5 hrs. Trying to gently bend hard line while holding back side so it would not move the back of head fitting around, nothing. Pulled the clip out of fitting, DON’T DO THIS, messed it up could not get it. Pulled fitting out of turbo, tried to bend the clip and would not work. So we pulled old fitting out of stock turbo and re-used, and pushed the line in and it clipped in like instantly. Will watch this since it has 50k on it already PRO TIP, HAVE A EXTENDED MINI MIRROR TO LOOK AT BACK FITTING BEHIND TURBO AND THE BACK OF THE TOP FITTING TO ENSURE ALL 3 PRONGS SEAT AROUND/ABOVE GROOVE OF HARD LINE. You can have 2 prongs seated not a third, thinking they are all and fitting can leak.
-Next, we did not use vacuum for coolant, lol, just poured coolant in expansion tank used orange concentrate and distilled water from store. It immediately started having a drip out of driver block coolant fitting (that we didn’t replace). This thing is buried with everything hooked back up, but not as bad as passenger behind a/c compressor. By this time it was late and I still had to drive 2 hours home. We took a long ass screw driver and tapped the bracket with hammer to push the hard line at bracket into the block more, the leak stopped. AT this point we said send it and I said lets put some heat in it and it should hopefully seal. Hooked everything back up, started it, no leaks. Burped system with heat on high, I pulled over along drive to top off etc.
-I changed oil before we started in case an coolant or anything else got in.
-I did the hold the gas pedal down and crank over 4 times. On the fourth time, I saw oil pressure on the gauge. Then started. Let starter have a cool down/break between each cranking. BTW we pulled starter on passenger side for turbo install
-At this point it was 7pm. I left around 8pm. I got home about 945. Long ass day standing up all day. I would guess we worked about 10 hrs and we took a break from lunch. Without the passenger side issue at 1.5 hour, we would have been done a lot earlier.
-I continued to check for leaks these past 3 days, have not seen anything. Expansion tank is holding coolant at steady level. If anything leaks now, it will be passenger side top jiffy-tite because we reused old fitting and it already had 50k miles or the driver block as i mentioned. Good news, at least the top fitting at turbo does not require turbo removal.
MY BIGGEST TIPS
-Be incredible careful when pulling turbo out because the hard line is there. If you hit this/pulls on it, it can damage jiffy tite fitting on the back of head. IF that thing leaks, it will be a ***** to get to.
-Be incredible careful and take time wiggling turbo off the hard line in the back (between turbo and block) If this moves around, it can damage block fitting. The Ford kit does not come with these fitting and requires to order extra.
- With mine initial leaking, maybe heat would have sealed it, maybe it would not have? I would suggest replacing these in the block with turbos out on driver and passenger side and checking the bracket, how far it seats. As mentioned, you have to remove a/c compressor to do passenger, driver nothing like this is required.

I will continued to check for leaks, hopefully there are none. It drove home fine 2 hours and has been fine to work.

I have loaded "base tune" from my man @Boostking and currently data logging. Can instantly tell it pulls hardder up top. The data log shows the boost just hold dead straight to redline.

I will sell the stainless manifold studs if anyone wants them.

I believe I posted everything, issued and suggestions. If I did something wrong, DON’T TELL ME, it will drive me insane. As I mentioned, spent about 10 hrs with 2 people working together/on each side and me doing random **** too. Yes I paid money for this. It is a DD and I had to get it done in one day. If you are to do this on your own and on jack stands, it will take MUCH LONGER just due to jackstands alone and your back will be broken. I would say it will take you 2 days if you are a highly skilled mechanic. If you are an average guy, it will take longer. Have an extra car or be willing to have wife drive you to work.

Finally, I did not re-read all this post in detail. If there is stuff that makes no sense, spelling error, etc deal with it. Ask me any questions you may have. I also did not take pictures, typical me. I get into the work and always forget. O well.

It should also be known, this Ford kit, has FORD tags on the turbo housing. It was previously stated the only difference between stock and these turbos, are stock say Ford and these "GT" say Borg Warner. This may be the case if you order from another vender, but the Ford kit specifically says Ford. So if you're worried about warranty work, get this kit. This makes sense too if the 2017 Raptor has these same turbos stock.

Big thanks to @Boostking and @Blown F-150 . They know all they did, no need to post on here.

@TX-Ripper hold tight, what you said cannot be done has been done, finally! Dyno numbers coming soon, along with 1/4 mile times.
 

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Discussion Starter #218
Information overload from WooBoost tonight!

New Android Auto Update....wait how does a 2014 have android auto!?

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Gorilla corrosion, this happened a few months after purchase.

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Used gorilla lugs i purchased from a nice gentleman on here and had powdercoated. I first tested one to see if the powdercoat would be too thick for socket to fit, it was not. They are Satin, inbetween matte and gloss, and match the wheel color perfect.

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Scuff mating edge with sand paper before installing:

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Thanks for the turbo install write up!
 
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