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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today we installed a new oil catch can on our project ecoboost truck. Just a quick run down on these, when you have a boosted application, or some stock aplications, you get blow by. This runs the PCV through the catch can and takes any oil out of the system. We currently have 21,700 miles on the truck. I will drive it for about 1,000 miles and we will report back on how much oil we get built up. Stay tuned...


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EcoBoost F150 Oil Catch Can

Also we had to alter the instructions a little for this to work on the ecoboost trucks, so we will post a video soon on how to install it.
 

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Be interesting to see, I am in the market for one as it is.... especially if much oil shows up.
 

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Looking forward to seeing how usefull this item turns out to be, I may have to add it to the extensive list as it is LoL.
 

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I have something similar on my turbo civic. Assume ford did a good enough job with the stock pcv. 30psi and 9k hopefully generates more blow by haha. In for details!
 

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What is blow by? What does this product do for your engine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here is something I found on this issue, not specifically talking about the F150s, but blow by happens in all engines. There was a picture here to (And 6 more pages of text) here is the link if you feel like reading Crankcase Ventilation Explained - N/A Edition

The piston rings don't seal perfectly, so there is some air that gets by them and we call that blow-by. This blow-by air pressurizes the crankcase, causing major problems, such as oil seal failure, and needs to be dealt with. Introducing vacuum to the crank case is very good as it promotes ring seal and reduces windage losses (drag on the rotating crank caused by a cloud of oil in the crank case). Since having vacuum in the crank case is good and having pressure there is bad, we must get rid of the pressure somehow.

The air comes in contact with a lot of oil in the crank case and basically turns into a mix of air and oil (along with a little bit of gasoline and water). This air/oil mix is represented by the red arrows in the crank case and as oil gets removed throughout the system I've made the color shift towards blue. I even showed little oil droplets condensing out of the air as it goes up through the "catch can" oil separator. I didn't show them everywhere in all the baffles, but you can imagine the same thing happening everywhere you see baffles.

The amount of air and oil can be quite significant. To handle this large quantity of air and oil, Nissan put in two important pathways for the pressure to escape from the crank case to all the air to properly evacuate. On the left, the air and oil can escape the crank case up along the timing chain portion of the block and into the valve cover. This is the usual pathway for the air to take. On the right, the oily air can escape the crank case (in times where there is excessive pressure to evacuate) through the provision in the side of the block, up through the oil separator (catch can) leaving the crank case.

The goal is to have a vacuum in the crank case. This is accomplished on some vehicles with a dry sump oil system, but on regular vehicles the intake manifold is used for the source of vacuum. Basically the engine is setup to consume its own blow-by gasses. Not a super great idea because it coats the intake in oil residue and lowers the effective octane of your fuel, but it certainly is efficient, practical and good for the environment.

How does blow-by lower your octane? Blow-by gasses with any amount of oil in them will lower the effective octane rating of your fuel because the vaporized oil will ignite at lower energy levels than 87 octane (R+M/2) gasoline. The more of it you allow to enter the cylinder, the more you will have to worry about detonation. This is usually not a big worry for naturally aspirated engines, but obviously forced induction is a different story.


If you've been paying attention we now have the blow-by gasses up and out of the crank case and in the valve cover now. The gasses are going to continue on through the small PCV (positive crank-case ventilation) port at the top-left corner of the valve cover which includes a one-way check valve so things can only flow out (and not in). The gasses flow out of the PCV port and into the intake manifold where they are sucked back into the engine to get consumed and pushed out of the exhaust. Simple enough.

Now the gasses have a bit of oil mixed in with it, on its way out of the valve cover it passes through a labyrinth of baffles designed to help condense the oil and collect the oil from the air. The more surface area the oil has to cling on to the more oil will separate from the air. The oil that is collected drains back down onto the valvetrain and eventually returns to the oil pan.
 

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Very interested in the results. I had one of these on my twin turbo stealth back in the days.
 

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Blow by is very inherent in turbo charged motors. Just ask the owner of a pre emissions CAT C7 powered rear engine diesel pusher motorhome.
 

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im gunna have to talk this whole thing over with some of my turbohead buddies !
Haha i made that up.
i can imagine if you put something inline to catch the oil it would collect there but i just cant see it being that much that it would be more economical than to just blow it out the exhaust.
im new to the turbo thing but i know a buddy that runs 23lbs of boost off a big turbo on his car and he adds oil into his gas deliberately.
it just looks to me like a headache in the respect that i would have to empty it out every couple weeks (more unwanted maintenance)
 

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The oil is there whether you like it or not. Having had numerous forced induction Mustangs, I can tell you that there is oil in the air. You don't have to have an oil separator...Ford didn't put one on the truck. If you are going to turn it back in after a 3-year lease, then don't waste the $100; it won't be your problem anyhow. Now if you plan to have the vehicle for a very long time or simply like to take care of your $50k investment the best you can...then you may want to consider an oil separator. If you don't put one on, you'll still see 200k miles...but your won't have maximum performance (that you may not notice anyhow since it's a slow deterioration). But they really do work. The oil being in the can will attest to that. You'll probably only need to empty it once every couple months or longer as Ford probably did a nice job with the PCV system anyhow. I'll be buying one for sure.
 
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