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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm coming from a 2008 Honda Civic and looking to get a F150 that can easily cross country tow for a year. My wife and I want to travel for a year after we both get out of the Air Force.

What would be our best bet on Ford trucks and configuration to look for? Do we need a F150 or a F250? We want to get a 27ft travel trailer with a GVWR of no greater than 7500lbs.

Any suggestions on what to lookout for since we're completely new to the world of trucks and Raving?

I'm here to learn and we appreciate any/all help.
 

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2013 Ford F150 XLT 3.5 Ecobeast SuperCrew 4X4
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Look for a 19 or 20 year model F150 with 3.5 ecoboost engine, Max Tow package, and if you can find one, Heavy Duty Payload Package or HDPP. Look for good maintenance records with reciepts, dates, and mileage. Clue- HDPP will have 6.5' bed. Otherwise, about any F250 will do the job easily.
Thank you both for your service.
Good luck.
Welcome to the forum !
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Look for a 19 or 20 year model F150 with 3.5 ecoboost engine, Max Tow package, and if you can find one, Heavy Duty Payload Package or HDPP. Look for good maintenance records with reciepts, dates, and mileage. Clue- HDPP will have 6.5' bed. Otherwise, about any F250 will do the job easily.
Thank you both for your service.
Good luck.
Welcome to the forum !
Thank you for the fast and clear response! I wasn't expecting a response to come back so quickly! Also, that you for your support! So to summarize, you would recommend getting basically a new F150 with a HDPP at a minimum? Is there any reason you recommend the 3.5 EB over the 5.0?
The extent of my truck knowledge is solely tactical vehicles (MRAP, MATV, etc)
 

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You're welcome !
I don't necessarily recommend a brand new truck but if you buy used you should be very particular about how the truck was maintained. I know without a doubt, having been in the AF myself, you know how important good maintenance practices are.
Max Tow is what you want and if you can find a truck with both Max Tow and HDPP, it is even better.
The Gen 2 3.5 Ecoboost engine is a direct and port injection engine with twin turbos, one on each exhaust manifold. They make a lot of torque, which is essential for towing and hauling. The 5.0 normally aspirated engine and the 2.7 Ecoboost engine are capable of towing 7500 pounds, but the 3.5 Ecoboost does it better and easier.
 
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Much as I love our Boosts, I’ve gotta imagine that if I were going to buy a truck dedicated to towing for a year that an F250 is the way to go. Let’s be honest these F150’s will tow loads beyond their ability to manage heat over the long difficult hauls. I know this sounds like blasphemy but I think it’s a better option as a dedicated tow vehicle.
 

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Much as I love our Boosts, I’ve gotta imagine that if I were going to buy a truck dedicated to towing for a year that an F250 is the way to go. Let’s be honest these F150’s will tow loads beyond their ability to manage heat over the long difficult hauls. I know this sounds like blasphemy but I think it’s a better option as a dedicated tow vehicle.
Not blasphemy. Just courageous honesty.

Full time, or even "majority-time" towing an RV cross country, in my opinion is F250+ territory. And this is coming from a huge F150 Ecoboost RV towing fan!

The whole point of the F150 RV towing advantage over the F250 is the not-towing portion of ownership experience. The F150 is so much nicer when not towing. For so many reasons. (opinion based on owning F150, F250, F350 over the last few decades)

With the recent addition of the 7.3 gasoline F250, you do have the option of an F250 without the $9000 premium of the mighty Diesel power stroke drivetrain. So when you AREN'T towing, at least you aren't burdened with the extreme overkill of 500HP and 1000lbs of torque. Lol A magnificent beast! But ridiculous co$t per mile when running empty.





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...The whole point of the F150 RV towing advantage over the F250 is the not-towing portion of ownership experience. The F150 is so much nicer when not towing...
That’s exactly what I was trying to convey. If the OP were going to tow a micro-pup trailer it would be one thing. That said, I gotta think that these people are rewarding themselves for service well rendered and want something that they can comfortably kick back and relax, actually live in for a year. The F250 or beyond simply makes sense.
 

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Full-time cross country RVing? Super Duty territory. Especially if you're looking at a 27' RV (you'll find most of those are heavier than 7500, and everyone always underestimates the weight of what they're carrying around).

An F250 or F350 Power Stroke would be the best performing option. However, if you don't want the diesel price tag and the diesel repair bills (should they occur), a new F250/350 with the 7.3 Godzilla engine should be completely reliable with power to spare.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So the overall suggestion is to get an F250 with either the diesel engine or the new 7.3L? Is there any particular gear ratio to look for?
 

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So the overall suggestion is to get an F250 with either the diesel engine or the new 7.3L? Is there any particular gear ratio to look for?
With the 7.3 you can get the 4.30 ratio and locker.
With the PowerStroke diesel you can get the 3.55 ratio and locker.
The 10 speed auto tranny has 3 overdrive gears so no need to worry about the axles being too low ratio.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What is the best bang for the buck package on an F250? I've read around that it would be the XLT trim.
 

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What is the best bang for the buck package on an F250? I've read around that it would be the XLT trim.
Define "bang". If you're considering the truck that will tow the most, the most bottom-end package means less weight, which means more payload.

Features are all about how comfortable you want to be. I didn't buy a Lariat 502A truck because it was the best bang for the buck, but because I value things like auto-4WD, automatic climate control, and cold air being blown up my butt in the summer 😂
 

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XL-STX. No kids ? Supercab, 6-3/4' bed, 3.73 rear, 2wd, 6.2
Good value.
I would want at least XLT premium package, 4wd, 7.3, 4.30 gearing, SuperCrew, 6-3/4' bed, full length console, rear locker ... 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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Discussion Starter #15
My wife and I do not have any kids but we would like a decent amount of creature comforts since we plan on keeping the truck for at least 10 years. We still want to go with a 26-28ft trailer and have been looking at F150 because we don't plan on towing every single day. We'll probably tow for 5 or so hours every 5-8 days going from place to place. We want to do that for about a year just to take some time to decompress.

Do y'all think the F150 would be able to accomplish the towing task for us or should we legitimately just go in for the F250.

Lastly, I've noticed that the higher trims on the F150s don't have the option for HDPP or Max Tow Package. Is that because of all the doodads that are installed in the truck? Is it just standard on the truck at those higher trims so it doesn't specify it? Do they still have the capability to tow even though it doesn't specify HDPP or Max Tow package?
 

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If you're building a dedicated tow pig, I'd go F250/F350, especially if you are happy with the gas engine options. If you said "I'm going to daily drive this truck to work, but plan to go to a state park once every few weeks" then it would be a different discussion. The cost difference isn't large. Do be careful of insurance - in some states, insurance goes stupid over a certain GVWR (requires a commercial policy).

Max Tow is an option on everything except a Limited. HDPP is only available up to the XLT 301A ("XLT Mid") package. Probably more to do with packaging and profits than the actual payload.

As for creature comforts, especially with the wife on board, I wouldn't want anything less than an 302A XLT Premium truck.
 

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My wife and I do not have any kids but we would like a decent amount of creature comforts since we plan on keeping the truck for at least 10 years. We still want to go with a 26-28ft trailer and have been looking at F150 because we don't plan on towing every single day. We'll probably tow for 5 or so hours every 5-8 days going from place to place. We want to do that for about a year just to take some time to decompress.

Do y'all think the F150 would be able to accomplish the towing task for us or should we legitimately just go in for the F250.

Lastly, I've noticed that the higher trims on the F150s don't have the option for HDPP or Max Tow Package. Is that because of all the doodads that are installed in the truck? Is it just standard on the truck at those higher trims so it doesn't specify it? Do they still have the capability to tow even though it doesn't specify HDPP or Max Tow package?
If you are keeping the truck for 10 years, and are going to dedicate for towing for at least a year, take it from my experience..... Diesel. I came from the diesel world and the only reason why I went to the F150 was we stopped RV life on the road and just do it occasionally now.

The Diesel will have a higher re-sale value, clearly the ideal tow rig and have great pulling manners for a bumper tow. Now, with that, I would go the F250 with a 5th wheel (Just me) but in no way would I not do a 27ft bumper tow with the F250.

I would get the XLT Package, should have a lot of good features. Some fairly used F250's can be had for a great deal. If you don't need the Crew Cab, the extended cab is great. I suggest at least the extended cab because full time RV life you will want the extra cab space for goodies and stuff.
 

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If you’re going to be towing all year I would lean towards an F250 or F350 SRW. Any one of the three engines offered in the Super Duty trucks will do the job. You can get a SD with a gas engine for pretty much the same price as an F150. A Super Duty with a top XLT package should have the comforts you want an still be affordable.

I would suggest going to the Ford website and play around with different build options. Whether you buy new or used that will still help educate you on your decision. Also start reading all you can on towing if you’ve never really done it before. Again just to begin educating yourself so you know what to look for and questions to ask. Good Luck and Happy Travels
 

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Going back a bit, the OP suggests towing 5 hours every 5 to 8 days. That means 6 out of 7 (ballpark) days not attached to the trailer. Doing this for a year, with a 26-28ft trailer, suggests a properly equipped F150 may just do the job. I would hunt for a max tow truck (HDPP would be a bonus) with a payload rating over 1800lbs. That should do fine for towing 5 hours a week on a trailer under 7500lbs.

I could live very comfortably in something like this:

 

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That IS a sweet Grand Design

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