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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all,

I came across a 1 owner, well maintained (oil changes every 5k) 2013 EB SC with 304k miles for $6000. It needs an actuator for the 4WD but other than that it runs and looks great. Has anyone rebuilt the 3.5 EB? I'm no stranger to this kind of work but have never done a TT engine. Sure it runs great but I wouldn't want something to break and put the engine and components in worse shape, so I figure doing a rebuild if I buy it would be ideal to give it a longer life.

Phil
 

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I'm the last person to want to discourage someone ambitious enough to rebuild their own motor. Afterall, at 64 years old I grew up in the Era of fellas doing those kinds of things. But having said that, this isn't a 350 Windsor or a Chevy LS. (I don't think these motors lend themselves to the garage rebuild for several reasons) They are expensive for one thing. Expensive enough that just buying a short block (or longblock) ends up being pretty competitive by the time you add things up.
I always felt that a good find on a low mileage wrecked truck might be a viable option too, as long as the logistics involved works out. (room to work on two trucks)

Whatever you choose to do, I sure hope you stick around and share your project with us. I think you'll find there's a few folks around here eager to urge you on. :)
 

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Documented oil changes every 5000 ? As in on record at a legit shop ? Or ? Do you know the owner ? How many owners have had it ?
Now, if that 304k has always been on Amsoil 5-20 SuperSyn ... (joking)
 
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My opinion - buy it, drive it and repair what breaks when it breaks. Worst case if it totally blows up is you part out the truck and recoup the $6000. :)
 

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I can't be the only one that when I have a vehicle that I want the peace of mind that comes with preparing for the worst........I prepare.
Having a replacement motor isn't a big risk. If you end up needing it, you are ready. If you are fortunate enough to not ever need it there's always someone who does.

I know it's not a common strategy, but it's legitimate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm the last person to want to discourage someone ambitious enough to rebuild their own motor. Afterall, at 64 years old I grew up in the Era of fellas doing those kinds of things. But having said that, this isn't a 350 Windsor or a Chevy LS. (I don't think these motors lend themselves to the garage rebuild for several reasons) They are expensive for one thing. Expensive enough that just buying a short block (or longblock) ends up being pretty competitive by the time you add things up.
I always felt that a good find on a low mileage wrecked truck might be a viable option too, as long as the logistics involved works out. (room to work on two trucks)

Whatever you choose to do, I sure hope you stick around and share your project with us. I think you'll find there's a few folks around here eager to urge you on. :)
Oh yea, this would definitely come with a learning curve. This ain't the 95 4Runner I rebuilt in high school lol. Junkyard/salvage finds is what I was thinking would be an easier option too. I'll have to research the differences over the years and find what years would work. Thanks for your advice and warm welcome!

If it's not broken, don't fix it :)
I know right? I kinda want to see how far I can push it.

Documented oil changes every 5000 ? As in on record at a legit shop ? Or ? Do you know the owner ? How many owners have had it ?
Now, if that 304k has always been on Amsoil 5-20 SuperSyn ... (joking)
Yes, all work done at his local Ford dealer, he definitely took care of it, body and interior are in good shape too but the cab corners started rusting. He's the original owner, about 70% of the miles are highway towing though. He's selling because he's unsure how much longer it'll last and uses it for work so he doesn't want to chance having to buy a new truck and get whatever's available, he ordered a nice 2022 model that was just delivered. Other than that though, it's never let him down. I am trying to get more records from him, seeing what's all been done to it. I mean at that price it's a steal, wrecked and blown F150s are going for the same or more and this one is fully functioning. If I got this, I'd have $4-6k to play with getting work done on it.
 

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Oh yea, this would definitely come with a learning curve. This ain't the 95 4Runner I rebuilt in high school lol. Junkyard/salvage finds is what I was thinking would be an easier option too. I'll have to research the differences over the years and find what years would work. Thanks for your advice and warm welcome!



I know right? I kinda want to see how far I can push it.



Yes, all work done at his local Ford dealer, he definitely took care of it, body and interior are in good shape too but the cab corners started rusting. He's the original owner, about 70% of the miles are highway towing though. He's selling because he's unsure how much longer it'll last and uses it for work so he doesn't want to chance having to buy a new truck and get whatever's available, he ordered a nice 2022 model that was just delivered. Other than that though, it's never let him down. I am trying to get more records from him, seeing what's all been done to it. I mean at that price it's a steal, wrecked and blown F150s are going for the same or more and this one is fully functioning. If I got this, I'd have $4-6k to play with getting work done on it.
I personally feel that 70% highway towing and 5k miles oil changes are the best possible scenario. These engines like to be hot to help burn off gasoline and contaminants in the oil.

If you look around, you will notice that most of the very high mileage Ecoboosts that had minimal issues are the ones that got worked regularly. The people who short trip them and don't work them are the ones that run into trouble it seems like.
 

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Is it going to be a daily with no backup vehicle?

Anecdote: the short block seems to be very good. The surrounding components are usually what fails, coolant lines, manifolds, timing chain, ect. It couldn't have made it this far without proper maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My opinion - buy it, drive it and repair what breaks when it breaks. Worst case if it totally blows up is you part out the truck and recoup the $6000. :)
That's true, even at salvage value with a clean title it's worth that.

I can't be the only one that when I have a vehicle that I want the peace of mind that comes with preparing for the worst........I prepare.
Having a replacement motor isn't a big risk. If you end up needing it, you are ready. If you are fortunate enough to not ever need it there's always someone who does.

I know it's not a common strategy, but it's legitimate.
I've been thinking about just getting parts and having them on-hand for when/if it happens. Sourcing a lower mileage 3.5 from a wrecked one maybe too. I've been looking at posts and online about rebuilding it vs putting a crate engine in. I know at minimum I would want to rebuild the turbos, do the timing chain, inspect all internal components, mild rebuild of the cams, pistons, sleeves, etc.

I personally feel that 70% highway towing and 5k miles oil changes are the best possible scenario. These engines like to be hot to help burn off gasoline and contaminants in the oil.

If you look around, you will notice that most of the very high mileage Ecoboosts that had minimal issues are the ones that got worked regularly. The people who short trip them and don't work them are the ones that run into trouble it seems like.
That's true in alot of regards. I'd rather have a high mileage vehicle that's been maintained versus a low mileage minimal maintenance, sitting most of the time. Time and sitting unused IMHO does more damage than a maintained high mileage one.

Is it going to be a daily with no backup vehicle?

Anecdote: the short block seems to be very good. The surrounding components are usually what fails, coolant lines, manifolds, timing chain, ect. It couldn't have made it this far without proper maintenance.
More than likely. I have an old Pilot that is rusted and beat to hell as my daily and might just keep it as backup in case rather than send it to the junkyard.


I got another response from them after asking a series of questions.

"Ok no problem I will give you some background on the truck, then I’ll answer your questions. My husband retired in august of last year. He was a foreman and this was his work truck! All Highway miles. He kept very good care of it. Regular oil changes, tires, etc. needs tune up and possibly a coil. Still gets 18 mpg and yes would trust it long miles. Never ever broke down . All service done at Ford or Tireman. It’s had water pump replaced. A “u” joint and both front wheel bearings. Wheel bearings may need replace soon. Brakes, tires, oil all good. Maintenance is great. There is a set of Michelin tires on it with good tread and fancy rims and still have the set of Goodyear Wranglers with chrome rims to go with it. Whew!! Got any more questions. Welcome to come drive it!"
 

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As long as you go into it with the understanding that it's a crapshoot, I think you'll be okay. Most the fixes can be done by yourself if you're mechanically inclined, that's to say 4-5 star inclined, not 1-2 star. The only thing I'd add is the parts from this generation are going up in price quite a bit and becoming obsolete. For me that would be one reason to get something a little more recent regardless of mileage. I also probably would not do this for my primary vehicle, because some of the fixes will easily take the vehicle out of operation for day/week as you gather special tools, parts on backorder, etc.

As much as it is tempting to find and take advantage of a well serviced vehicle, miles are miles and the truth is a lot of parts are at or beyond their service life and simply worn out.
 

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Yeah, I'd probably feel quite a bit better knowing the history of the vehicle the way you do. Always with the understanding that it is a lot of miles and there comes a point where things simply need to be repaired and with these engines it can be expensive.
 
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