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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. I have a 2013 F-150 ecoboost 3.5. Truck has 198,000 miles. I have a drivers side turbo coolant leak from one fitting on the turbo. I removed the turbo and have the new coolant fittings (2 total). I also have the one for the engine block.
My question is the one line and fitting that goes back behind the firewall on the rear of cylinder head. Has anyone ever replaced this without pulling the cab, engine, etc and if so how? When I moved the line up out of the way to remove the turbo I’m scared I may have damaged the o-ring in the fitting. The line is very loose and not only does it swivel loosely up and down but has slack rocking it side to side with my fingers. Worried I will start the truck and leak after all this work. I thought about comming in from the top of engine and looks like I could reach behind easier by taking the intake manifold off? What is the size of the fitting
Any help on how to do this is greatly appreciated!
Brian
 

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If you have the fitting to replace it with, don't you know the size already? Some people have done it as you suggest, from underneath. I tried every way I could and I could not get my fat stubby hands in there. I believe one person also mentioned they were able to unscrew the fitting with the tube still clipped inside it. Same with installing. This way you don't have to pull the line out and you know for sure it's seated in the fitting. If attempting it with this approach, I would make sure the other end is NOT installed in the turbo so the fitting can find it's way in there with some wobble. I'd try a spanner wrench if doing it this way so you can get underneath the tube. You may have a little more room from the top with a valve cover removed as well.
 
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X2 to what Blown F-150 said. I didn't do mine, Ford did, but the mechanic did say the easiest way to do it is by removing the intake manifold. Don't forget the new gaskets. It would suck to get everything torn apart and realize you forgot to get new gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Does anyone know if you need to remove the high pressure fuel pump in order to take off the intake manifold? I have everything out of the the way on top of the manifold. It looks like if I remove the 8 bolts it will lift off but the lines going into the pump will interfere. I’m hoping I can just disconnect these without breaking torque on the bolts and removing the entire pump. Also, will the high pressure line going next to the manifold need to be loosened and removed prior to taking the manifold off?
Just thought I would check to make sure before I remove something that’s not needed.
Thanks again for all the help!
 

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You can get the intake off without removing the HPFP, I recommend throwing a rag over the Fuel rail connection at the HPFP and cracking that line. Then disconnect from the HPFP. This will give you a bit more wiggle room to pull the intake. Be careful not to drop the nut that holds the Fuel Rail line in place, it's a small fastener.
 

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It takes some work, but if you pull the intake (15 minutes) and the rear cross-over tube (get new o-rings), then it’s not too bad to get to that fitting from the top..

I have to replace the fitting on back side of the motor on drivers side and the fitting on the side. I didn’t the ones on the turbo and put everthing back together and when I filled the coolant I had leaks from the side and back of motor. Smh.. my question is how do I get to the back fitting. I’ve pull the intake manifold. But still can even feel the fitting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.. thanks
 

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You’ll need to grab a mirror and have a good look. Here is the best pic I have of there location. You can see the passenger broken one on the far right and me holding the left one. They are in a crappy spot and you may have more luck accessing through the wheel well.

Good luck.





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Great info guys! New to the forum. I have a 2013 f150 ecoboost. Just hit 100k and found my fittings at the turbo leaking. I bought one fitting that goes to turbo and the one at block to try and figure out a way to use a different fitting style. I was reading it can be common at the turbos since there is alot of heat there (makes sense). I will replace all these fittings but i have been trying to find something after market or ideas to replace these fittings and not have to go back in the future and replace again because of some o rings. Anyone have ideas or come across any after market set ups to replace these fittings and/or lines ?
 

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Great info guys! New to the forum. I have a 2013 f150 ecoboost. Just hit 100k and found my fittings at the turbo leaking. I bought one fitting that goes to turbo and the one at block to try and figure out a way to use a different fitting style. I was reading it can be common at the turbos since there is alot of heat there (makes sense). I will replace all these fittings but i have been trying to find something after market or ideas to replace these fittings and not have to go back in the future and replace again because of some o rings. Anyone have ideas or come across any after market set ups to replace these fittings and/or lines ?
The actual threads on the heads and turbos are AN threads. So technically you could use AN lines.
Then issue is the amount of room to get lines routed, so you may have to get creative with routing


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Hello everyone, Im new here to this forum. After reading about these lines leaking most of my afternoon I wanted to get in on a discussion more or less to follow the progress of the posts and to share what I end up doing with this design flaw. I have had just about every common issue with my '14 3.5 during its measly 45,000 miles and just found a puddle of antifreeze under her this morning. Long story short Im really not looking forward to replacing the current jiffy connectors with the same poorly engineered equipment that has me in this situation in the first place. Basically Id like to go the AN fitting route if it promises to be more reliable than the current rubber o-rings that fail. I will have my intake manifold and fuel rails out to get to a suspected clogged fuel injector soon as I am also tracking the culprit of a cylinder #6 misfire (one thing after another). Im hoping with all of the hardware out of the way I can get a 90* AN fitting mounted to the head.
Anyways, if I get to it I will definitely share some photos and info.

If anyone has a link to a post on the AN fitting used as a turbo connector I would appreciate it being shared. Im to the point I have a headache from searching Bing and Google for all the tips/info I can about these OEM fittings. Thanks in advance
 

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Hello everyone, Im new here to this forum. After reading about these lines leaking most of my afternoon I wanted to get in on a discussion more or less to follow the progress of the posts and to share what I end up doing with this design flaw. I have had just about every common issue with my '14 3.5 during its measly 45,000 miles and just found a puddle of antifreeze under her this morning. Long story short Im really not looking forward to replacing the current jiffy connectors with the same poorly engineered equipment that has me in this situation in the first place. Basically Id like to go the AN fitting route if it promises to be more reliable than the current rubber o-rings that fail. I will have my intake manifold and fuel rails out to get to a suspected clogged fuel injector soon as I am also tracking the culprit of a cylinder #6 misfire (one thing after another). Im hoping with all of the hardware out of the way I can get a 90* AN fitting mounted to the head.
Anyways, if I get to it I will definitely share some photos and info.

If anyone has a link to a post on the AN fitting used as a turbo connector I would appreciate it being shared. Im to the point I have a headache from searching Bing and Google for all the tips/info I can about these OEM fittings. Thanks in advance
I will hit up a local hose maker in town see if i can come up with something. If all else fails im gona try replacing the o rings with BOSS o rings. They are more durable and higher heat i believe. If all else fails but i will keep you posted if i come up with something.
 

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This is the best pic I could find. I don’t have part numbers though. Looks like heat shield on it and all. Any particular name for that part?
I will hit up a local hose maker in town see if i can come up with something. If all else fails im gona try replacing the o rings with BOSS o rings. They are more durable and higher heat i believe. If all else fails but i will keep you posted if i come up with something.
That was another thought I had too. Basically updating the current connectors with a better o-ring.
I have yet to tear into this project. I'm putting a parts list together currently. Thanks for the replies




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This photo helps a lot. Im familiar was AN fittings but not familiar with that solid piece its connected to.
 

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That’s just because I have a one-off set up using Gen2 turbos. That hard line is the factory coolant line for Gen2 turbos.


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Do you happen to remember if you used PTFE hose or any special hose for high temps? Im finding the max operating temp on the typical stainless hose is 300 degrees with the stuff Summit sales. While Im aware coolant temps should not get to 300 degrees I have no idea what temperature the coolant coming out of a turbo might be.
 
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