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New to the forum, but have previously used it to get a ton of information. I own a 2016 Expedition. I’ve already removed the driver side turbo to replace a faulty o-ring last year. Well, looks like I’ve got a leak coming from a new location.
While reading through this thread the gears in my head started spinning… all the talk of tight spaces, lack of better replacement options, etc. got me to thinking. Years ago a had a freak incident where a rear shock was able to get cocked on it’s upper rubber grommet, and came in contact with a brake line. It wore a whole in it. Instead of replacing the entire line I cut out the bad section (about 4-6in) and replaced it using a double flare kit.
With that said, I’m thinking I could get my hands on a new line. Cut the line (only enough to remove the tapered ends) to remove the crappy o-ring/ snap-ring nut. Replace it with it’s A&N equivalent. This way there is no need for all the adapters I saw pictured above. The A&N nut coupled with the double flared line would provide a leak free connection.
Any thoughts?
 

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2013 race red SCrew 4x4 air lift bags
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New to the forum, but have previously used it to get a ton of information. I own a 2016 Expedition. I’ve already removed the driver side turbo to replace a faulty o-ring last year. Well, looks like I’ve got a leak coming from a new location.
While reading through this thread the gears in my head started spinning… all the talk of tight spaces, lack of better replacement options, etc. got me to thinking. Years ago a had a freak incident where a rear shock was able to get cocked on it’s upper rubber grommet, and came in contact with a brake line. It wore a whole in it. Instead of replacing the entire line I cut out the bad section (about 4-6in) and replaced it using a double flare kit.
With that said, I’m thinking I could get my hands on a new line. Cut the line (only enough to remove the tapered ends) to remove the crappy o-ring/ snap-ring nut. Replace it with it’s A&N equivalent. This way there is no need for all the adapters I saw pictured above. The A&N nut coupled with the double flared line would provide a leak free connection.
Any thoughts?
Do it and let us know, it's definitely not the worst idea.
Now, of sharkbite would start making brake/coolant lines, we'd have a lot more flexibility on fixing.
 

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I’ve done some modding already. So I think I can make my idea work like I made this kit work. Gotta add my Full Race CAI this weekend after I finish up with it’s modding for sensor fitment. As you can see I’ve got the Full Race setup on a vehicle the kit it not meant to be mounted on (at least that’s what Full Race told me). I actually got it done with little issues, and went to Full Race to show them. They liked it…
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Do it and let us know, it's definitely not the worst idea.
Now, of sharkbite would start making brake/coolant lines, we'd have a lot more flexibility on fixing.
Justinjs,
I’m thinking of giving it a shot as soon as I can get my hands on the parts. Gonna give the local dealers a call on the Ford parts. Then, I’ll have to find the correct A&N fastener for replacement. I’ll let you all know what I come up with.
 

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I just did the turbo coolant leak repair today on a 2012, replaced stock with nylon braided -6. Did it with turbos in, from the top, wheel well, and underneath. Only "special" tools made were with a blowtorch to bend up a few cheap wrenches to work in the spaces better. Tight, but do-able.

The parts list a few pages back to upgrade to AN is just 90's and 45's, but i have found on the inner turbo coolant port a 60 bend AN fitting was almost a perfect fit to line up with a 90 fitting on the block. Haven't found any pics of the AN lines... assembled hoses or installed. I didn't know whether everyone else was using a longer piece and making a tight U between 2 90's or just straight at it. I went straight at it, adding almost an 1/8" of extra hose length to give it a gentle bend. Being right under the manifold, I slid a small piece of XRP silicone fire sleeve around the hose area.
 

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I just did the turbo coolant leak repair today on a 2012, replaced stock with nylon braided -6. Did it with turbos in, from the top, wheel well, and underneath. Only "special" tools made were with a blowtorch to bend up a few cheap wrenches to work in the spaces better. Tight, but do-able.

The parts list a few pages back to upgrade to AN is just 90's and 45's, but i have found on the inner turbo coolant port a 60 bend AN fitting was almost a perfect fit to line up with a 90 fitting on the block. Haven't found any pics of the AN lines... assembled hoses or installed. I didn't know whether everyone else was using a longer piece and making a tight U between 2 90's or just straight at it. I went straight at it, adding almost an 1/8" of extra hose length to give it a gentle bend. Being right under the manifold, I slid a small piece of XRP silicone fire sleeve around the hose area.
Nice. Will have to save this for when I’m ready to get back under there at the turbos. I replaced my driver side top, and side, fittings. Next time I get in there I’m seriously considering replacing the turbos.
 

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I just did the turbo coolant leak repair today on a 2012, replaced stock with nylon braided -6. Did it with turbos in, from the top, wheel well, and underneath. Only "special" tools made were with a blowtorch to bend up a few cheap wrenches to work in the spaces better. Tight, but do-able.

The parts list a few pages back to upgrade to AN is just 90's and 45's, but i have found on the inner turbo coolant port a 60 bend AN fitting was almost a perfect fit to line up with a 90 fitting on the block. Haven't found any pics of the AN lines... assembled hoses or installed. I didn't know whether everyone else was using a longer piece and making a tight U between 2 90's or just straight at it. I went straight at it, adding almost an 1/8" of extra hose length to give it a gentle bend. Being right under the manifold, I slid a small piece of XRP silicone fire sleeve around the hose area.
For the ones who don't know, I've never tampered with AN fittings and have little knowledge of them.

That being said, I'm going to replace my turbo and coolant line in a few months. It looks like you did a 90 off the head to a 60 and ran a line down to the turbo. What did you put for fittings off the turbo? How did you secure the line from jostling around and touching the manifold?

Feel free to school me on AN fittings and what to get/do to replace the steel coolant line with AN stuff.
 

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90 off the drivers side block and 60 at turbo. m14x1.5 and m18x1.5 to -6 same as posted earlier in this thread. If you do the job and make the line, you will see there is no need to secure it to anything. Its such a short line and its not going anywhere. If i reach my hand in there and try and move it, i can squish the hose if i really try but its not moving anywhere. At the time my thought process was if its a slight bend down (away from the manifold) any expansion/contraction has room to happen, and it would "tighten" the fittings, rather than bending it up and any expansion would be trying to "loosen" the fittings.

I went to a local race shop, and bought everything. Had to order the 60 online. If anyone is doing this in southern Ontario, RTM Racing in Stoney Creek had everything needed and way cheaper than other online shops or amazon. $9/ft for hose, $18 each AN fitting, and $6 each metric/AN adapter, that's Canadian dollars. Also bought a nitrile o-ring kit for each metric fitting. didn't bother with copper or hybrid washers on my gen 1. Used a 15.8x20.6 on the m18, and a 11.8x16.6 on the m14. still wondering if i should of went one size smaller on each oring but its on there now and we will see.

The only special thing i had to do with the m14 fitting at the turbo was put it in the lathe and take 3-4mm off the threads to match the stock JT fitting length to make sure it didn't bottom out before the oring was completely seated. This can be done with a hacksaw and file as well.

Soon im doing a timing chain. When the intake is off i will do the rear block/turbo lines and post that too. At this time i have just done the inner coolant line.
 

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You’ll need to grab a mirror and have a good look. Here is the best pic I have of there location. You can see the passenger broken one on the far right and me holding the left one. They are in a crappy spot and you may have more luck accessing through the wheel well.

Good luck.





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This is the best pic I could find. I don’t have part numbers though.




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that wire right there above the coolant line with a white and blue sticker next to it and a blue line with a zip tie on it, that wire, where does ir go, what does ir connect to i am so lost. all i see is it just hanging out the back of
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New to the forum, but have previously used it to get a ton of information. I own a 2016 Expedition. I’ve already removed the driver side turbo to replace a faulty o-ring last year. Well, looks like I’ve got a leak coming from a new location.
While reading through this thread the gears in my head started spinning… all the talk of tight spaces, lack of better replacement options, etc. got me to thinking. Years ago a had a freak incident where a rear shock was able to get cocked on it’s upper rubber grommet, and came in contact with a brake line. It wore a whole in it. Instead of replacing the entire line I cut out the bad section (about 4-6in) and replaced it using a double flare kit.
With that said, I’m thinking I could get my hands on a new line. Cut the line (only enough to remove the tapered ends) to remove the crappy o-ring/ snap-ring nut. Replace it with it’s A&N equivalent. This way there is no need for all the adapters I saw pictured above. The A&N nut coupled with the double flared line would provide a leak free connection.
Any thoughts?
Did you ever end up doing this?
 
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