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The solution for me will be adding something such as this to help protect it: https://www.amazon.com/APS-F66789H-...locphy=9031807&hvtargid=pla-491997800614&th=1

Though haven't decided on the actual one I'm getting yet.
I'd be afraid of how much air flow that blocks. You are already asking a fairly small hole to feed a pretty big CAC, which is fine because the CAC really only flows about 50% of its area, but if you cut that hole size in half then I could see it causing issues.

I was honestly just thinking about floating a heavy screen out in front of the oil cooler an inch or two. Just to catch debris.
 

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18 Plat Screw, FX4, 3.5, 10R80, max tow, stock tune, Mishi CAC no louvers, Mishi rad, 40/60 cool/H2O
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I get stuck on a fundamental limitation, which is that for a fixed amount of airflow there is a maximum amount of heat (btu) that can be transferred. Stacking radiator cores or adding aux cores (like trans or oil coolers) actually decreases airflow. This is ok as long as the available airflow is not at the max heat it can transfer already. If it is, then using more cores doesn’t really help. Just transfer the same btu through additional parts.

I would think that either 1) forcing more airflow through existing + additional cores or 2) locating additional cores in new airflow would be much more effective. I know both of these have already been discussed, just recapping.

On my truck, I don’t see a good way to locate additional cores in new airflow. Therefore, finding some way to increase airflow through existing paths would be the only practical option.

A few days ago I posted some thoughts on doing this by altering the hood and or fenders like the high hp Roush mustangs. Concept being to vent hot engine bay air and create a lower pressure zone behind the existing core stack. This should result in more airflow through it, and therefore more heat transfer. Has anyone gone down this path?
 

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2013 F150 FX4, 3.5L TT, SCrew, S&B CAI, FR CAC, Solo OR Downpipes, 3.5 in exhaust, 5* Tune
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I get stuck on a fundamental limitation, which is that for a fixed amount of airflow there is a maximum amount of heat (btu) that can be transferred. Stacking radiator cores or adding aux cores (like trans or oil coolers) actually decreases airflow. This is ok as long as the available airflow is not at the max heat it can transfer already. If it is, then using more cores doesn’t really help. Just transfer the same btu through additional parts.

I would think that either 1) forcing more airflow through existing + additional cores or 2) locating additional cores in new airflow would be much more effective. I know both of these have already been discussed, just recapping.

On my truck, I don’t see a good way to locate additional cores in new airflow. Therefore, finding some way to increase airflow through existing paths would be the only practical option.

A few days ago I posted some thoughts on doing this by altering the hood and or fenders like the high hp Roush mustangs. Concept being to vent hot engine bay air and create a lower pressure zone behind the existing core stack. This should result in more airflow through it, and therefore more heat transfer. Has anyone gone down this path?
I've debated trimming the inside of the cowl in order to allow more heat to escape. I also have been brainstorming into fender vents. I have some gen 1 raptor fenders in my garage awaiting a conversion. However, I don't believe they are functional due to the sheet metal of the engine bay. A hood with heat extractors like the raptor or other aftermarket options would be good in theory, but I'm not sure they are worth the money just to see.

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I get stuck on a fundamental limitation, which is that for a fixed amount of airflow there is a maximum amount of heat (btu) that can be transferred. Stacking radiator cores or adding aux cores (like trans or oil coolers) actually decreases airflow. This is ok as long as the available airflow is not at the max heat it can transfer already. If it is, then using more cores doesn’t really help. Just transfer the same btu through additional parts.

I would think that either 1) forcing more airflow through existing + additional cores or 2) locating additional cores in new airflow would be much more effective. I know both of these have already been discussed, just recapping.

On my truck, I don’t see a good way to locate additional cores in new airflow. Therefore, finding some way to increase airflow through existing paths would be the only practical option.

A few days ago I posted some thoughts on doing this by altering the hood and or fenders like the high hp Roush mustangs. Concept being to vent hot engine bay air and create a lower pressure zone behind the existing core stack. This should result in more airflow through it, and therefore more heat transfer. Has anyone gone down this path?
This is why I moved the oil cooled down into a separate flow path. I wouldnt mind moving the trans cooler too, but would be worried that, without the fans, the trans could get very hot at low speeds.
 

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18 Plat Screw, FX4, 3.5, 10R80, max tow, stock tune, Mishi CAC no louvers, Mishi rad, 40/60 cool/H2O
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This is why I moved the oil cooled down into a separate flow path. I wouldnt mind moving the trans cooler too, but would be worried that, without the fans, the trans could get very hot at low speeds.
Better than in front of the upper stack, for sure. Still, trading btu’s with the cac. If the cac wasn’t “using up” the heat transfer capacity of the airflow, then you should come out ahead. The “win” is if you get more TOTAL heat transfer out of the motor and in to the passing air.

Too bad there is not another practical location for additional heat transfer with “new air”. I don’t see it looking at my truck.
 

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Too bad there is not another practical location for additional heat transfer with “new air”. I don’t see it looking at my truck.
The plastic insert piece in the bumper (where the front license plate would mount) can be removed and the entire space opens up to the CAC. I replaced the plastic piece on my 2017 when someone backed into my truck. I was surprised to see how big the potential opening could be.

Check it out you'll be surprised. No experience with the Gen 1 tho so take that with a grain of salt

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2013 Ford F150 XLT 3.5 EgoBeast SuperCrew 4X4, 3.55 axles, 9.75" w/elocker
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The plastic insert piece in the bumper (where the front license plate would mount) can be removed and the entire space opens up to the CAC. I replaced the plastic piece on my 2017 when someone backed into my truck. I was surprised to see how big the potential opening could be.

Check it out you'll be surprised. No experience with the Gen 1 tho so take that with a grain of salt

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The 12th gen 3.5’s have an opening there. I put in a lower grill. Lots of gravel roads here.
 

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What about raking the hood at the back to allow the hot already rising air to escape from the rear?


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Larger holes inside the cowl area opening to the engine bay ?
 

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18 Plat Screw, FX4, 3.5, 10R80, max tow, stock tune, Mishi CAC no louvers, Mishi rad, 40/60 cool/H2O
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What about raking the hood at the back to allow the hot already rising air to escape from the rear?


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The rear of the hood can be a problematic area. The fresh air intake for the cab is right there. Not a good spot for hot engine bay air. Better spot is just behind the fan shroud. Also, the upper side of both fenders about where the f150 badge is.
 

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18 Plat Screw, FX4, 3.5, 10R80, max tow, stock tune, Mishi CAC no louvers, Mishi rad, 40/60 cool/H2O
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Larger holes inside the cowl area opening to the engine bay ?
Not sure what you are referring to. Letting any frontal air past the rad into the engine bay would increase pressure in the engine bay and decrease flow through the stack.

But a new air path that you could get another core in (like an oil cooler) would probably help.

Did you mean near the rear of the hood at the windshield line? Does that vent the engine bay?
 

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What I was thinking and I'm not sure.
 

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The rear of the hood can be a problematic area. The fresh air intake for the cab is right there. Not a good spot for hot engine bay air. Better spot is just behind the fan shroud. Also, the upper side of both fenders about where the f150 badge is.
That may be true if we were talking about sitting still...however at 50+ miles per hour that air will be flowing fast enough to have little to no effect on the fresh air intake...also I live in Florida and constantly have mine in recirc anyway.


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Not an f150, but interesting.



I would think an f150 would have similar low pressure areas over the hood between the fan shroud and the front of the block. I would love to see a “factory fit” vent that could be dropped right in.
I would consider this is someone made a good looking one.

Also, the fan shroud. What if that is the hold up?

One thing I noticed when I installed the fan with my mish is that there is a 3/4" gap between the shroud and the end tanks down the sides due to the fact that the radiator core is flush with the tanks. The fan shroud was designed to fit into the "notch" of the stock radiator so that the top/bottom fit against the core and the sides fit against the tanks.

I am kinda wondering if this was intentional on mishimoto's part or if they just had no other way to do it and didnt wanna make people cut the shroud. I also wonder if it will help my high speed cooling but hurt low speed.
 

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Has anyone changed the factory fans? Surely Flexalite S-blade fans would be an improvement of airflow over factory fans?


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Has anyone changed the factory fans? Surely Flexalite S-blade fans would be an improvement of airflow over factory fans?


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The problem with any fans is they don't do anything once you get above 25-30 mph anyways. Youre not relying on the fans to move the air through the radiator at freeway speed.

If you mounted shroudless fans then they could help if the stock fan shroud is causing a restriction at higher speeds. I know when I built a shroud and e-fan setup for my Jeep liberty to replace the mechanical fan, the shroud/efan combo actually was worse at freeway speeds then just having no fan at all. At low speeds, not having a fan was def an issue.

At the end of the day though, the only way to keep that jeep cool was a mechanical fan.
 

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I would consider this is someone made a good looking one.

Also, the fan shroud. What if that is the hold up?

One thing I noticed when I installed the fan with my mish is that there is a 3/4" gap between the shroud and the end tanks down the sides due to the fact that the radiator core is flush with the tanks. The fan shroud was designed to fit into the "notch" of the stock radiator so that the top/bottom fit against the core and the sides fit against the tanks.

I am kinda wondering if this was intentional on mishimoto's part or if they just had no other way to do it and didnt wanna make people cut the shroud. I also wonder if it will help my high speed cooling but hurt low speed.
I had no such gap on my 2018 install. The fan shroud fits flush to the Mishi rad all around. Not a perfect seal, of course, but not any big gaps either.

I actually considered allowing the fan shroud to somehow “pivot open” along the bottom as an alternate to cutting holes and adding rubber flaps. There is not a lot of room, but I bet I could get a 1/2” to 3/4” gap without anything hitting. Maybe hinge the top and cut the tabs at the bottom. Just let it hang and open slightly under pressure. Maybe a light spring on each side near the bottom to keep it from banging.

I’m actually curious to see if the vent flaps you installed on the shroud actually open at higher speeds. I have the bits to do this sort of mod on my 2018, but haven’t yet.
 

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I ran my "Pre-Upgrade" test over the weekend. Sardine canyon in North Utah. Max of 6% grade on a 5 mile climb. Not terribly difficult compared to other grades. But, I still hit 238 when the ambient temp was only 70. Oh by the way, I am only pulling a 3k lb camper. I really hope throwing everything at it makes a difference. (trans cooler, radiator and oil cooler w/ coolant bypass).
 

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What about the air going down and under the intercooler/radiator? Could this be deflected back up? The sides have the flaps and the top meets the hood, so there's really no other air escaping the stack. Only way around this is to increase the frontal area, which has already been shot down as technically impossible. More flow is impossible without opening up new areas or increasing the direction of air in existing areas. I'm not convinced there's a huge positive pressure behind the stack limiting the flow, but there could be some gains here.
 
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