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Just finished Patrick's 2011 Flex Ecoboost install, and here is what we found:


The 2011-2014 will not be much different so this guide will help all, but the install will take app. 30-45 minutes if your handy. This syatem entirely reworks the PCV evacuation system as well eliminating the water/oil/unburnt fuel accumulation in the IC as well as trapping the oil and damaging compounds that are part of the blow-by crankcase vapors.


The system now will provide steady evacuation in both non-boost and boost operation unlike the OEM system that only evacuates at idle and part throttle non-boost operation eliminating the reason the crankcase fills with the water and unburnt fuel in the first place.


So, what we found righ away when we removed the throttle body and scoped the intake valves is this issue is just as bad as the F150's, and this vehicle with only 30k miles on it already has substantial intake valve coking, so we recommend he do a seafoam treatment (a manual cleaning is far better). The intake charge pipe was soaked in oil as you can see from the pictures below, and so was the IM and throttle body. (Patrick is strapping it to the AWD dyno right now for some runs as well).


So, here is what we found when removing the throttle body:












We could dump oil right out of some of it.


We then snaked the boroscope into the front most ports we could access through the IM snout, and after several attempts where the lens got oil covered, we were able to see the valves. Here are a couple of pictures of the boroscope screen showing, but it is not a real clear picture:






To return the engine to it's efficiency it first had, a manual cleaning is really needed but an upper induction cleaning will help.
 

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And now onto the install. The Flex is only different from the F150 by the engine being a longitudinal configuration, so fitment of the can for mounting was a bit more difficult, but we found a pretty ideal spot and draining will be through a drain hose that protrudes out the bottom so it can be accessed easily during oil changes, or simply by placing a cup under it and opening the 1/4 turn ball valve drain.





So to begin with, we remove the engine cover, and locate the tubes we will be removing.


The tube from the rear most cam cover that has a integrated checkvalve from the factory runs to the barb on the intake manifold snout right behind the TB:





Remove the tube and using a razor blade, carefully slit the hard plastic tube at the OEM barb so it will split and allow removal:



You can then use the included 5/8" short tube to attache the reducer bars to the OEM fitting so it snaps right back on:





Do the same with the front cam cover cleanside line:



The ILE style cleanside spearator will then replace the oil fill cap and use the incuded vacuum cap to cap the barb on the cam cover, running the hose from the cleanside separator to the barb on the intake pipe the OEM line originally connected to:




You have now replaced the direct line that allows oil/water/fuel to enter the charge pipes and the IC. The cleanside separator will catch and return the oil caught during the momentary reversion when transitioning from non-boost to boost.



We then move to the suction source that provides evacuation during boost (note, the same source is used for the brake booster vacuum when in boost as well until later years when a aux vacuum pump is added):


We are going to drill into each inlet tube that feeds the turbos with a 3/8" drill bit (if cold temps, warm with a hair dryer). If the hole is to small to allow the barb to push in for a snug fit, ream it slightly. It also helps to add some RTV or similar sealant to the barb to ensure a good seal. Do not be concerned with any small plastic particles that may fall into the tube, these will pass harmlessly through:
The rear tube




and the front tube where we T into the secondary evac outlet on the can:






Now we mount the can itself. Note the bracket is 2 piece, and is adjustable. We remove the single plastic fastener shown to open an existing hole to mount to:




Reaching up under the cowl you can place the bracket and fasten with the 1/4 20 x 1.5" bolt and nut:



Now connect each line as follows. The line from the rear cam cover will connect to the center of the catchcan (inlet) with no checkvalve.



One outer fitting from the can, with checkvalve flowing away from the can connects to the intake manifold vacuum barb.



The final outlet from the can connects to the T'd line from each inlet tube providing suction for evacuation while in boost operation.



And the final finished install looks almost factory:
 

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If you guys have a Flex, SHO or Explorer Sport or Lincoln MKT/MKS this will work for it.
Let me know if you want one!
 

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One question, and I think I might definitely show my true colors of not being much (and that's giving myself some credit) of a mechanic but I was wondering if this issue is comparable or could be comparable to the reasons of why people have to do the EGR deletes on the powerstroke engines? I remember that system recirculation instead of evacuation causes tons of problems on the diesel engines, which is the widely known issue of the 6.0 powerstroke. Would this be the same results as mileage keeps piling up on our ecoboost engines? Being an EGR delete victim, I ended up spending a huge pile of money on my old diesel engine, therefore the reason I was wondering. By the way, sorry if I'm pointing at two different and opposite issues, but like I mentioned, I don't know that much but saw the pictures and read your explanation and, for some reason, the EGR delete came to my mind.
 

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I will be buying one of these soon. I wish is wasn't so damn cold in MN right now. Then I could get it done sooner. I will probably buy extra hoses too. Just in case I need to put it back to stock.
 

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One question, and I think I might definitely show my true colors of not being much (and that's giving myself some credit) of a mechanic but I was wondering if this issue is comparable or could be comparable to the reasons of why people have to do the EGR deletes on the powerstroke engines? I remember that system recirculation instead of evacuation causes tons of problems on the diesel engines, which is the widely known issue of the 6.0 powerstroke. Would this be the same results as mileage keeps piling up on our ecoboost engines? Being an EGR delete victim, I ended up spending a huge pile of money on my old diesel engine, therefore the reason I was wondering. By the way, sorry if I'm pointing at two different and opposite issues, but like I mentioned, I don't know that much but saw the pictures and read your explanation and, for some reason, the EGR delete came to my mind.
Completely different deal, the EGR on the 6.0L has coolant in it, there's issues with the coolant throughput and clogging if I remember right, been a few years since I had my 6.0L Excursion.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Correct. The EGR's also coke up quickly with deposits.

Wish I would have never sold my 7.3 Excursion....best vehicle I ever had as far as a diesel.


Here is a video to see what the ecoboost produces in the winter:

 

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Appreciate the clarification and link. It does help to see what's going on and learning as we go with these awesome vehicles. I love the truck so I was hoping it was not the same issue.
 
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