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It had C rated tires when I bought it, which are 1820 lbs each. I bought and had D rated tires at 2149 lbs each. I felt like the C rated were going to just barely be adequate if I ever have the trailer loaded to its max gvwr and one corner is heavy. My trailer axles are almost a perfect 50/50 split.

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I will be putting on my "D" rated GY endurance tires today. I'm a little late to the party. Just read about this a few days ago. My trailer has OEM "C" rated tires on it from the factory, same as you, the load rating was just about at max on the OEM tires. Glad I caught this before our 1,000 mile trip to the coast in a few weeks!
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Well, you have to figure that the trailer tires don't support the entire trailer weight. For example, my trailer comes out to 6560, but only 5700 is supported on the trailer axles. That's how they come up with a set of tires that only barely support the trailer's max gvwr (7500 in my case). I just felt a lot better going up.

This is the tire I went with in 205/75/15 and 107M load/speed ranges.

https://www.discounttiredirect...skmaster-tire-contender-ttt868

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I bought E tires for the 10 ply side wall for more support and less sway. I knew D tires would suffice but just wanted more rigidness. Just my 2 cents:)
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I understand, and that would be great if this was a TV only. However, it's also my commuter and our family vehicle. I average around 25,000 miles a year and maybe 10 percent of that is towing.

I also didn't buy a monster that's well over ally ratings. Lol

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Lol yep I put them to minimum psi when I have no load. D tires also get more mileage, my E's only 50,000
 

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I guess I have never had any of those issues with my setup to feel I needed stiffer tires. I am on 33" duratracs. The bilsteins certainly help settle the truck after bumps. The air bags help stiffen it a little but usually only fill them to 10-15 psi unless I have a ton of stuff in the back.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
It was back roads, 45-55 the whole way, but it towed very well coming here. A lot of curvy bumpy roads, but I didn't get any indication of what highway sway would be like. Passing semis didn't phase me. It was 92 degrees out and intake temps were great. No long grades though. Some short ones, and it motored right on up. My truck likes 3000 rpms. So I'd keep it near 3000 and let it eat. I have got to get me a tune that won't try to pull at 1800 rpms and 15 psi at 1.8 load.

The 2.7 is a beast of a little motor, that's for sure.

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Discussion Starter #28
I got unloaded axle weights this morning.

Unloaded 3100 lbs on the front axle, 2260 on the rear axle.

Compared to 3100 loaded front, 3040 rear

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
I briefly touched on my mountain trip in another thread, but I'll make a more detailed post on it here. I might start trying to use this to report on my towing experiences with the 2.7. Since it's chosen to tow with less frequently, we get a lot of questions in other places about how it may perform.

Last weekend we hauled the camper up to Cherokee, NC from home here in Pageland, SC. I still have never touched my WDH from the initial adjusting, and I have to say it must be just about on the money. For this trip I did pack it more nose heavy than the last few. I loaded up most everything myself this time, and got most everything in the front bedroom. The under mattress storage is aggravating to utilize, but I did this time. Drinks, clothes, heaters, outdoor chairs, outdoor tables, etc. Anything with some weight was either in the front bedroom or the pass through storage.

Just to recap, my mods are Wagner CAC, 2.5 inch level, Autospring add a leaf, 5* performance tow tune, and I'm using a Curt True-Track hitch with 4 points of sway control.

I did not weigh the rig for this trip, but we're packed heavier than before. Due to being a cold weather trip, we had more clothes packed, a few bundles of firewood, and a few heaters since the furnace had not been thoroughly tested. We also packed a little more to entertain the little princess. With the first trip at 6560 I would guesstimate this trip being 6800-7000.

Since the camper (and setup) is still very new to me, and I'm still learning to trust it, I didn't want to push the speed going up. I would set my cruise on 65 going uphill, and 55 and even 50 sometimes going down.

Full disclaimer, the steepest grades we have are 9-10%. That said, the truck had no trouble maintaining the speed I wanted going up or going down. I did not need to ride my brakes or use them very much at all downhill. It would shift as needed and slow my descent very well. It really likes to pull at 2500-3000 rpms. It would occasionally need to grab 3500 for a short time to accelerate, then it would shift and settle in again between 2500-3000. On the way home I was more comfortable, and I set the cruise on 70 most of the way. Again, no trouble with that. I would fine myself accelerating to get around slower trucks in the right lane, and no trouble merging out and getting her up to 75 to get around and back over without holding up traffic at all. No trouble keeping up at lights, etc. I never felt like I needed more power and I never had to use all of the skinny pedal.

I didn't have to do as much manual shifting as I thought. It seems like the tow tunes can sense the load and lugs the engine less. I DID find myself, upon cresting a hill, going ahead and bumping the cruise down and locking out a gear or two to get a head start on maintaining my slow descent speeds (this country flat lander isn't real crazy about twisty downhill driving in traffic for some reason. Up doesn't bother me.) By getting a jump on the shifting before I began a descent, that allowed me to avoid the truck starting to speed up, THEN the computer starting to downshift and try to slow me back down. If I started down in the correct gear at the speed I wanted, I wouldn't have to use my brakes. This I like.

All of my temps were fine, but it was only 50 out while pulling. I think 213 is the highest coolant temp I saw. Trans temp under 210 mostly.

As far as handling and sway, that was great too. I could feel the suck and throw from a passing semi a little bit, but it was mild and controlled. No trouble at all. I never had any sway. I felt comfortable behind trucks or passing them, I felt fine changing lanes, etc. This hitch is very nice. It felt much better than towing that truck on an equipment trailer with no WDH way back when. Even when I'd have to make a run up to 75 in a hurry.

I had pulled more weight than this through the same mountain range, but as you all know a camper is a horse of a different color. I have some friends who told me I was crazy to try doing it with this much camper, some of those being folks from here. Now there are no doubts. It was great.

I got 9.5 mpg, which is about what I expected.

TL:DR

For guys with a 2.7 wondering how it can be as a tow rig, mine seems to do well to at least 7500 lbs. Power is good, handling is good with a 4pts of sway control hitch.

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Edit- I forgot I did have one hiccup to report. While climbing one time the truck threw a wrench and went into limp mode. I wasn't quick enough while checking for codes and it said no codes found. I drove a couple of miles like that on a max of 3 psi. Actually still held 65 mph, just used ALL the rpms to do it. Lol. Found a good spot, pulled over, restarted, and no more issues. Pulled like a Brahma bull the rest of the trip. If I had to guess it was an over or underboost code, but I can't verify that. I've had that happen a few times while running a tune while I've had this truck. In fact at some point I've had it happen with EVERY tuner I've used. Usually I'll catch it on a log and get to verify the code and they can edit the tune and prevent it.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Here is the post I made way back when the last time I towed in the mountains with this truck.


I have to give Torrie some props. Regarding tow tunes, all everyone talks about is 5*. While I was heading up to Ohio this past weekend hauling just an empty trailer and a lot of tools and roadside emergency gear, I started stock but missed the pep. Then I tried the performance tune since it was a light load. It did okay but shifted nowhere near how I wanted. All paramaters looked good, but my truck builds a ton of part throttle boost in upper gears on performance tunes, and that just acted weird. I sent him an email inquiring about ordering a tow tune. Within 30 minutes I had paid for, and received, and loaded a tow tune from him. I keep my windows tablet in the truck for such things. I download the tune with my phone, then send it to the tablet through a wired connection. It worked out cheaper to buy just one tune from him vs 5* anyway, but I would never have ordered and received the tune that quickly through 5*. From my experience anyway.


I've towed on a 5* tow tune. This Unleashed tune was a beast. My truck shifted perfectly to stay in my power band (of which there was NO shortage), and did a good job maintaining speed down the mountains, and helping me stop at lights and such.


I grossed 12,600 lbs (coming back home), have a 2.7, and the tow was from Ohio to SC. Power was there, no problems holding speed at all, or accelerating if I had to slow down mid hill for some reason. I didn't need to touch the brakes much at all on the downhills, even at 5%.


I know Torrie is known for a lot of logging, and I think people are afraid to buy a tow tune from him because they don't wanna drag a trailer all over tarnation at WOT, but he nailed mine the first try. Knock looked good, temps looked good. Well done Torrie.



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Great post!

But I keep hearing how these aluminum F150's suck at towing and are "all over the road" and impossible to tow safely in.


OK ok, in all fairness, Ford DOES have a problem with SOME of these trucks NOT rolling straight. And even worse, one dealership will absolutely be clueless to address it, while another might have a remedy. If I was unfortunate enough to have one of those demon possessed trucks, I'd have no choice but to get rid of it, and it would leave a bad taste if Ford contributed zero to the loss involved.

Still, it's great to see these posts where the whole family is enjoying RVing in a substantial rig being hauled by an aluminum F150. And a 2.7 to boot!

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Just for the record... I tow a Jayco SL220 TH with my 2016 2.7 / 6 speed / 3:55's. My CAT scale numbers show my trailer at 8200lbs when fully loaded with 2 Harleys and full fresh water. I usually lock out 6th gear and just let the truck do it's thing. I keep my speed around 60mph. No complaints here.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Oh, one thing I forgot to mention that I wanted to talk about.

So, I still have P rated tires. Since I have a marginally rated tire, conventional wisdom says air that puppy up to max, right?

Well, that's what I've always done. However, a while back I stumbled upon a little internet argument on the subject. One fella was vehemently defending NOT doing that. Claiming he had been in the tire industry for many years. Designing and producing.

He said if you pay attention to the inflation tables, P rated tires carry their MAX load at something like 35 or 36 psi (which, SURPRISE, is usually about what's stated on our door sticker to run our tires at). As the chart goes on, the tires pick up no extra capacity at more psi than that. He said that all you will accomplish is ballooning out the tire a bit, wearing the center of the tire more and reducing your contact patch. Even while towing. And effectively make them tow WORSE.

I looked the chart up, and sure enough, the tires carry their max load rating at 36 psi or something like that, even though they have a max psi rating of 44. I've always followed what I thought was the conventional wisdom of airing my tires up to max for towing duties if I was towing heavy and getting close to max specs.

Most of the folks in this discussion wrote the guy off as a kook, but after looking up the inflation tables for myself, seeing that they did indeed carry max weight at only 36 psi, and considering that Ford does indeed have that as the recommended pressure on my door sticker, I thought I'd try it.

I decided to run the front tires at exactly that spec on the door, since they are carrying exactly the same thing they do unloaded. I ran them at 36. I still couldn't completely shake the old habit of airing up more in the rear while towing, so I aired the rear tires to 38. I thought you know what, I'll try it. If I don't like it I can pull over and air them up. I keep my Ryobi 18v compressor under the back seat at all times.

I swear to you that the truck felt a bit more stable and less squirmy this trip. Could it be placebo? I guess it could. But it DEFINITELY didn't feel worse. Last couple of times I went out I had them aired up to max. I won't be doing that again. I'll just run at 36 and 38, and I'm sure I'll be sticking with P rated tires in the future. Unless the size I'm looking at isn't offered in it (I may step up to a 33 next go-round).

So, call me crazy, or believe it, or be skeptical but try it for yourself. That's your decision. But, I SWEAR it was a better feel in the truck. I was a little doubtful myself, but I liked it.

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