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One of the guys on my forum with a SHO just became aware of this, I want to make sure you guys know this is going on. I am quoting Joel Miller from Reische performance. If you want a Reische t-stat I am a stocking dealer.
I am not entering the debate on t-stats or Livernois vs Reische just that I stock them and I am a Reische dealer and will always have them for you!

Hey guys Joel Miller from Reische here. Let's make one thing absolutely clear, we still remain the only company that currently produces a low temp thermostat that is specifically designed for 3.5L EcoBoost transverse applications. Tomc612: I'm very, very sorry but LMS pulled a fast one on you. That thermostat is made for a hot-side application (not a true direct replacement at all), it will function but not as well as a proper cold-side thermostat. I'm also going to disagree about the use of 160* thermostats for street use. We chose 170* as the best overall compromise for all season use. A 160* may cause problems in cooler weather depending on the tune programming, definitely wouldn't try it stock.

As far as special gaskets, only our Ford-50 unit (F150 EcoBoost) does not use the OEM o-ring but a (Stant 25282 or Gates 33619) comparable gasket which should be available at most auto parts suppliers. Gaskets are included in our thermostat kits so I don't see why this would be an issue anyway.

I believe LMS has made these substitutions based primarily upon profit margin, our thermostats are modified by hand and not cheap. I personally stand behind our products 100% and am willing to offer a lifetime warranty to the members of this forum who have purchased a genuine Reische product. Thank you for your support and any of you are welcome to call us at 661-414-2116 with any questions or concerns.
http://shop.ecoboostpowerparts.com/Thermostat-F150-Ecoboost-170-degree-F150-Tstat.htm
 

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This is Joel with Reische Performance Products, I want you guys to know that I am also available to answer any questions or address concerns you have about our thermostats or cooling systems in general. Thank you to those who have supported our products!
 

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Tomc612: I'm very, very sorry but LMS pulled a fast one on you. That thermostat is made for a hot-side application (not a true direct replacement at all), it will function but not as well as a proper cold-side thermostat.
Joel, can you explain the differences between "hot-side" vs "cold-side" application?
 

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Joel, can you explain the differences between "hot-side" vs "cold-side" application?
HotSide.jpg

So in the hot-side system the thermostat is placed pre-radiator: coolant flows in from the side (GREEN/RED) and, depending on it's temp, coolant is directed either up to the radiator to be chilled or if the coolant is not hot enough, the thermostat stays closed and the coolant is directed down through the bypass to recirculate. Of course the thermostat will often run partially open, directing a little coolant to both paths.

ColdSide.jpg

In the cold-side system coolant flows the opposite direction and the thermostat is post-radiator: Unlike a hot-side thermostat, the bypass control (brass bottom) is not attached to the upper assembly/diaphragm and does not move when the thermostat opens. It maintains contact so the bypass coolant can only flow up through the inside of the pipe, keeping the heat motor in direct contact with the bypass coolant temperature so the thermostat can function properly at all times. When the bypass coolant is hot enough the thermostat opens (bringing in chilled coolant from the radiator - BLUE); this also pushes the heat motor further down into the pipe which closes off the holes in the pipe for the bypass (RED) and shields it from the chilled coolant. However a small amount of bypass coolant is allowed to flow across the heat motor at all times so it can still monitor and respond to changes in the coolant temp.

A hot-side thermostat can function in a cold-side setup to a large degree but there are some drawbacks: When the thermostat opens some of the chilled coolant will mix in and expose the heat motor to cooler temps then it should be seeing to operate properly. Cooler temps then force the thermostat to start closing prematurely and once this happens, the hot bypass coolant will then start to make it open back up... and the cycle repeats. Another issue is the thermostat will always struggle to stay fully open because as soon as the bypass is completely shut off, the heat motor will no longer be exposed to hot coolant, forcing it to close again. The LMS/Even Flo thermostat attempts to address this by placing 4 holes in the bypass valve but then you always have a good amount of coolant recirculating through the bypass instead of being directed through the radiator as it should be.

In my own real world testing with a hot-side thermostat in a cold-side application I found the primary drawback was the way it handled changing conditions. You could see a nice stable temp cruising down the freeway but as soon as you exited and started slowing down to a stop the temp would immediately spike up and it took a little time for it to re-stabilize and cool back down.
 

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yes im interested also as i plan on tuning as soon as the X4 is available to me.
however my questions or concerns are that i live in the Northeast and i like good Heat and require good heat for 6 months out of the yr and sometimes 7.
i have concerns about how a colder therm would effect my warmup cycle , defrosting abilities of my windshield and what overall effects it would have during the colder periods with condensation in the engine and fuel in the oil.
i do believe that the hotter engine clean themselves of some of this, and the colder you run the less efficient it becomes at clearing these out.
 

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warmup cycle, defrosting abilities of my windshield and what overall effects it would have during the colder periods with condensation in the engine and fuel in the oil... and the colder you run the less efficient it becomes at clearing these out.
All I can say is typically I do not see people coming to me with these issues. But personally I have run a 170* thermostat in my daily driver in low to mid teen temps and did not notice any issues at all with warmup or the heater/defroster. The oil could be a concern depending upon how cold the temps are and the average trip duration. To be safe probably better to change the oil more often in the winter.
 

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thanks for the input and i agree we see alot of these trucks in warmer places than here in the north.
i am actually taking my truck this week for an oil change about 1,500 miles early because we have had miserable weather here for the last month and a half to two months solid.
with temps in the single digits and below zero it takes a long time to get everything up to full operating temp and the short trips here and there to town dont do it.
i dont even want to guess what the factory temp therm is but i know its pretty warm because when its not so cold out it runs pretty hot.

im kinda torn between colder plugs and maybe say a 185 therm to still keep some needed warmth !
 

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i dont even want to guess what the factory temp therm is but i know its pretty warm because when its not so cold out it runs pretty hot.
I believe your stock thermostat is a 188* (somebody correct me if I'm wrong) but yeah I think the weather has been fairly miserable everywhere this year. Even drove some of my family to make serious plans to move South :(
 

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I was reading else where that the OEM T-Stat is 180* and I was about to say "NO WAY ... I constantly see my coolant temps run 190-195* in normal driving".

BUT, if you are saying our T-Stats are "Cold-Side" (post-radiator), then I this would explain why I'm seeing my temps hit 190-195* during normal driving. The 180* is the MINIMUM temp the T-Stat will allow the coolant entering the block instead of exiting the block (and would explain why I'm seeing 190-195 in some very cold driving conditions before exiting the block).

Basially this OEM 180* Cold-Side T-stat works much like a 190-195* Hot-side ... so a 170* Cold-Side T-Stat may work similar to a 180-185* Hot-Side.

BTW, is the coolant flow "reverse flow" too?
 
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Basically this OEM 180* Cold-Side T-stat works much like a 190-195* Hot-side ... so a 170* Cold-Side T-Stat may work similar to a 180-185* Hot-Side.
There's no real difference to the relative ways coolant temp actuates either type thermostat. Either one will start to crack open at rating temp but it will take a good 10-15* more for the thermostats to allow significant flow through the radiator. Think of it like an electrical circuit with a switch placed before or after a lightbulb... doesn't matter which side it's on, it controls current flow either way.

However to make this a bit more complicated Ford has starting using a dry sensor in the head to 'infer' coolant temp instead of reading actual coolant temp. So if you're referring to readings from a sensor like this, I would estimate actual coolant temp to be around 8-10* cooler. At least this is what we found during testing but the difference is not always the same.
is the coolant flow "reverse flow" too?
Inside the thermostat yes, but actual flow through the system would depend on how the cooling system was designed.. typically radiators input the top and output the bottom though.
 

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if in fact a factory therm is 180* then a 170* would not be that big of a deal.
im sure 10-15* would not cause the world to end.
 

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Just did some research on the Motorcraft website and the 2011-14 F150 EcoBoost all call for the RT-1213 thermostat. The one I'm holding in my hand is marked 188* on the top and on the heat motor. Of course Ford reserves the right to change specs on their parts at any time so it is entirely possible that trucks could have shipped with a different temp, however current spec should be 188*.
 

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very good info !
i am requesting your reply to have a copy posted to the new DIY section.
that will be useful info.
 

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I haven't physically inspected my T-stat, but I could see where someone mis-read the 188 as 180. I am finding when my engine is fully warm and driving up our hilly highways, I typically see 190-195 on the flat sections and barley over 200 uphillls. Down hills I usually see 175. 188 would be in the middle of that range.

During the winter we were well below 0F for a number of weeks and I don't live that far from work. I purposely drove a "long way around" just to warm up my vehicle to the proper temperature to/from work.
 

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Is it necessary to get a new thermostat if getting custom tunes. New to performance mods and about to pull the trigger on a tune. I live in western ny where the temps can get really cold. Any negative side effects to running this in the cold?

completely stock at the moment with no plans on going crazy.

Pros/Cons?
 

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Thanks!
 

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Just ordered one since I am running a tune and plan on towing in Georgia and Florida this summer.
 
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