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Discussion Starter #1
I am buying a 2019 eco 3.5. It has max tow package, 7000 GVWR, 4 wheel drive, 5 ft bed, 20 inch tires, XLT per group, how heavy of a trailer can i safely tow with this truck.
 

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Depends.

(5½' bed)

Open the driver's door and see what the cargo capacity for this truck is.

You can probably tow as much trailer as you can up to the cargo limit of the truck. It's less about how heavy the trailer is, and more about how much of that trailers weight is going to be on the trucks suspension. (cargo capacity VS towing capacity)



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Discussion Starter #3
To determine how much weight is on the trucks suspension.....would that be the tongue weight?
 

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Yes tongue weight is how much weight is put on the truck, without a weight distribution system you will be lightening the front end and placing alot more weight on the back, with the system you can even that out a bit and be able to place some weight back on the trailer (there are entire threads that chase that rabbit around the farm three or four times).
The better question is what are you wanting to pull; livestock, tractor, camper, car, motorcycle, toy hauler, construction material? LIke stated earlier you will run out of rated cargo capacity long before you run out of the ability to pull a load.
 

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A 5.5' bed with max tow?
My truck has a cargo rating of 1430lbs and is rated to tow a 7000lb trailer. I actually tow a 8200lb (fully loaded) trailer... but... my tongue weight is only 1100lbs. I don't have any issues but I also keep a close eye on everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will be towing a TT with a UVW OF 8000, hitch weight of 900, GVWR OF 9995 , length of 34’. I am new to a TT so my questions are possibly a little goofy. Lol
 

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Not goofy. But yea, always the "how heavy a trailer?" instead of "what load can my truck carry safely?"

Like said above, you'll run out of cargo capacity before you run out of tow capacity, especially with this motor

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A 5.5' bed with max tow?
My truck has a cargo rating of 1430lbs and is rated to tow a 7000lb trailer. I actually tow a 8200lb (fully loaded) trailer... but... my tongue weight is only 1100lbs. I don't have any issues but I also keep a close eye on everything.
Lots of max tow trucks are 5.5. I have a buddy with max tow and 5.5 on an '18.

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Edit- I'm having trouble posting the link for some reason. Google "2019 F150 towing guide" There is an f150 towing guide and a Ford towing guide that covers more vehicles. Both contain a wealth of information.

The answers you seek are in this chart. Cross reference your wheelbase, gearing, and drivetrain to see the theoretical max towing ability. That's provided you ALSO don't go over gvwr or axle ratings.

It's a huge balancing act on a half ton to reach that fabled 13.2 or 12.9 without going over somewhere.

I prefer to throw most of that out the window. I like to look at my gcvwr (truck, trailer, cargo, whole shebang). I look at that and weigh my whole rig. Good? Good. Check that off.

Then I roll just the truck onto the scale with the trailer attached but not on the scale. That number less than the gvwr? Good? Good. Check that off.

Then I like to roll JUST the front axle into the scale. Note that. Do some math between that and the previous figure, conclude how much weight I have on each axle. Cross reference those to my axle ratings on the door. Good? Good. Check that off.

I now know I'm not over anywhere, or if I am, where it is and how much.


My truck has a 12,600 gcwr. My camper loaded up for summer camping leaves me about 1000 lbs shy of that, with about 400 lbs left on my gvwr (and my payload). I should be able to run all the way up to my gcvwr and still be good on my gvwr, but with no room to spare. So, it appears my truck is rated pretty well all around to be able to achieve all ratings simultaneously.

The funny thing, though, is there are trucks rated for several thousand more gcvwr than my truck, but with the SAME payload rating. If I can only just barely meet my gcvwr without going over my payload, how would one get several thousand more on a different truck without going over.


I just say that to put emphasis on how much all of this plays together, and how much attention you have to pay all the way around to determine what you can really do realistically.

With the charts and link I posted above and your placarded gvwr and axle ratings, you should be able to come up with what your truck is rated to do, and what you'll be able to tow realistically.

If you're towing a travel trailer, figure 10-15 percent tongue weight roughly to be taken on by your truck. I think other types of trailers run a bit less but that's of course based on loading. I think you'll still want to guesstimate in the 10-12 percent range. I've never done much scaling of things I towed other than with my camper.
Screenshot_20191204-101305.jpg


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