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2018 F150 3.5L 4X2 145"WB 5'5" bed 3.55 Axle Ratio Max Tow Package GVWR 6750 lbs.,GCWR is 15800 lbs., Payload 1786 lbs., and max loaded trailer weight is 10,700 lbs. Used my haul gauge on current rig and have 800 lbs tongue weight and 700 lbs. with WD hitch. Have been towing 30' TT with GVWR of 7495 lbs. with no issue. I did install a Roadmaster active suspension for increased stability. Would like to consider a 33' with GVWR of 10400 lbs. and dry tongue weight of 660. Concern is mostly length but obviously tongue weight as well. Don't anticipate much boondocking so don't think I would ever travel with full tanks and lots of gear so not sure if I would ever come close to new GVWR. Anyone consider making a similar move or has done it already that can offer advice?
What is the curb weight? I’m not in the least bothered by the length or GVWR on the trailer. My 2013 handles one in similar size and weight just fine. You just have to slow down sometimes if you want to keep some gas in the tank. But control has never been an issue. I do wonder about the really low tongue weight for a 10k gvwr. The old rule of thumb is 10% on a bumper, +/- 15% for 5’ers. The less tongue weight the less control especially once the trailer exceeds the weight of the truck. I towed a small jay feather with too much tension on the WD hitch and it was a kite.
 

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I would agree that cargo capacity is almost always the limit you hit before tow capacity, but I don't think that means tow capacity is a gimmick. It IS a marketing emphasis, of course, but the tow capacity is a real engineering limit.

I remember reading a review of some kind and it included an F150 towing a racecar (I think) around a track for many hours. The trailer and car were approaching the tow limit and it was clear that the overall packaging was perfectly designed to be "balanced" in a way that cargo capacity still had headroom left.

But yea, out in the real world our tow rigs aren't often designed that way. Bumper pull RV's almost always tax cargo over GCWR.

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Personally I would rather be over weight on my truck than too far off of the 10% rule of thumb, so long as it’s not to the extreme and my tires still have additional capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
What is the curb weight? I’m not in the least bothered by the length or GVWR on the trailer. My 2013 handles one in similar size and weight just fine. You just have to slow down sometimes if you want to keep some gas in the tank. But control has never been an issue. I do wonder about the really low tongue weight for a 10k gvwr. The old rule of thumb is 10% on a bumper, +/- 15% for 5’ers. The less tongue weight the less control especially once the trailer exceeds the weight of the truck. I towed a small jay feather with too much tension on the WD hitch and it was a kite.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
That low tongue weight seems odd to me as well. I was going to weigh it on the lot this weekend if possible.
 

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I think 10 percent is an absolute minimum. Everything I read recommends 12-15 percent as a goal for a travel trailer.

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I would agree that cargo capacity is almost always the limit you hit before tow capacity, but I don't think that means tow capacity is a gimmick. It IS a marketing emphasis, of course, but the tow capacity is a real engineering limit.

I remember reading a review of some kind and it included an F150 towing a racecar (I think) around a track for many hours. The trailer and car were approaching the tow limit and it was clear that the overall packaging was perfectly designed to be "balanced" in a way that cargo capacity still had headroom left.

But yea, out in the real world our tow rigs aren't often designed that way. Bumper pull RV's almost always tax cargo over GCWR.

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I just saw this on the 2020 F150 page the other day. This is the most I've ever seen them admit that the towing capacities are very limited in configuration:

164008


The funny thing is this disclaimer is almost as long as the text it was referring too.

The SAE J2807 test is pretty idealized too. Ram hosted TFL truck not to long ago while they were doing testing on their 3500 DRW. The trailer consisted of a flat bed cargo trailer with some 6" tall steel slabs on it. That was the load. So it was basically the ideal trailer. Low COG, no air drag, perfect weight distribution etc.
 

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2018 F150 3.5L 4X2 145"WB 5'5" bed 3.55 Axle Ratio Max Tow Package GVWR 6750 lbs.,GCWR is 15800 lbs., Payload 1786 lbs., and max loaded trailer weight is 10,700 lbs. Used my haul gauge on current rig and have 800 lbs tongue weight and 700 lbs. with WD hitch. Have been towing 30' TT with GVWR of 7495 lbs. with no issue. I did install a Roadmaster active suspension for increased stability. Would like to consider a 33' with GVWR of 10400 lbs. and dry tongue weight of 660. Concern is mostly length but obviously tongue weight as well. Don't anticipate much boondocking so don't think I would ever travel with full tanks and lots of gear so not sure if I would ever come close to new GVWR. Anyone consider making a similar move or has done it already that can offer advice?
One big issue in being overweight is in case of an accident and exceeding your load capacity of your truck could make you responsible for accident even if not your fault.
 

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One big issue in being overweight is in case of an accident and exceeding your load capacity of your truck could make you responsible for accident even if not your fault.
I have seen this claim a million times. I have never in my life seen anyone out gathering all the pieces of wreckage to weigh them after an accident.
 

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I have seen this claim a million times. I have never in my life seen anyone out gathering all the pieces of wreckage to weigh them after an accident.
Then you obviously spend time on RV forums.

After about the first couple of visits you'll be humiliated for even thinking that you can enjoy camping with a ½ton.

It's the "oil thread" of RV forums. Lol

But you gotta admit that there's some amazing folks with fantastic knowledge concerning other aspects of RVing.

As a full-timer, RV forums have saved me years of hardknocks.

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Then you obviously spend time on RV forums.

After about the first couple of visits you'll be humiliated for even thinking that you can enjoy camping with a ½ton.

It's the "oil thread" of RV forums. Lol

But you gotta admit that there's some amazing folks with fantastic knowledge concerning other aspects of RVing.

As a full-timer, RV forums have saved me years of hardknocks.

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LOL. Yes, to all of that. RV'ers can be the most helpful people on the planet, both on the internet and in the campground.

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Payload will be a close factor indeed. Calculate out your load you’d have in the truck plus any aftermarket items installed on the truck to see if you have enough room. This trailer loaded up will probably be somewhere around 1200 lbs of tongue weight and that’s not a for sure number. Just depends on how you load it.
 

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I pulled this from grand design. Best to use the manufacturer GVWR, as the advertised UVW and hitch weight are never correct.
FIFY

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