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Hi, I have been loving the idea of a truck for at least 5 years, this past summer I went out and bought my dream truck. I love the color, I never had buyers remorse as I have had with past car purchases. The back up camera is awesome, I love my truck! A 2014 F-150 3.5 L Eco V6.!!! Information on my paperwork: 3.31 lock RR Axel, 7200 GVWR, 145" wheelbase, 1478 payload, 15100 GCWR. I am having such a hard time figuring out what I can safely tow. RV dealerships tell me I can tow more than I think I can..I want to tow a toy hauler with two motorcycles. I have been looking at some lightweight haulers where you have the bikes in the living space, 21 to 28 foot trailers. I just get more confused by all of the weight information that is out there. I need it simplified...Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated!
 

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I have that in my owners manual, but I still am hitting a brain wall, Is this correct thinking? 15100 GCWR minus 7200 GVWR = 7900- 1600 (approx weight of bikes in hauler)=6300- 500 payload = 5800 lb trailer? I was just hoping someone could help me understand how to find the correct information. Thanks
 

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8000 Lb +/- a few hundred lbs, max trailer on a 3.5 with 3.31 gears with tow package.
 

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15100 GCWR minus 7200 GVWR = 7900- 1600 (approx weight of bikes in hauler)=6300- 500 payload = 5800 lb trailer?
That is not the correct calculation. Your trailer tongue weight will be counted as part of the gross vehicle weight once it is sitting on the truck. I agree that you could pull 8k, but you will most likely be over payload with that much tongue weight (1040 @ 13%). You didn't actually give enough info to read your truck on the chart (4xX and cab style) needed to find the exact tow rating. Because of the 14xx payload, I would stay around 6-6.5K (roughly 850 on the tongue). At that weight, you may still want air bags or some other suspension component.


Edit: The example in the manual is poor, but is only meant to ensure you add in tongue weight.

All of this assumes you are looking at a hitch mounted trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for helping,,it is a 4x4 super cab..it is set up for towing from the factory...I don't have the max towing package. Originally, I was planning on a hitch mounted trailer, but after reading up on traveling with a hauler, I'm looking into going with a weight distribution hitch.
 

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A weight distribution hitch is still mounted into your receiver the same way a ball hitch is. It just distributes weight toward the front wheels and eliminates sway.

The same tounge weight and payload capacity apply with a WDH.
 

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A weight distribution hitch is still mounted into your receiver the same way a ball hitch is. It just distributes weight toward the front wheels and eliminates sway.

The same tounge weight and payload capacity apply with a WDH.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think they necessarily eliminate sway. Some hitches do both but I think some hitches only do sway OR weight distribution.


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Could be correct. Ive only ever dealt with one setup when I was a kid. It had load bars and a smaller ball point for a sway bar.
 

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1st thing would be to go and fill your truck up with gas and hit a weigh station.

Weigh your truck as is, with you in it.

Once you have that number, subtract it from you trucks GVWR. this will give you your actual payload. The one on the door doesn't include any accessories added by the dealership (running boards, tonneau cover, etc.), or anything in the truck (yes that includes people).

Then you can figure out your max tongue weight, which will also give you your trailer weight.

But you mentioned toy hauler, What kind of bikes? Harleys? dirt bikes? Mountain? Toy haulers typically have very heavy tongue weight ratings, as they don't take into account the cargo in the garage. Don't be surprised if you can't find a toyhauler that works with your numbers.

Of course, many people don't care about meeting the weight ratings, but I tend to error on the side of caution when towing, I am well under all my numbers.

re: WD/sway hitches. Yes they are two completely different things, that can be combined into one hitch. Usually the expensive ones (hensley, reese dual cam, etc.), have both integrated.

Some sort of sway control device is recommended on all trailers, even if it is just the sliding/friction style.

A WD hitch should be used on anything with a tongue weight close to (or above) 500#. Anything over that, you are exceeding your OEM hitch ratings, and will experience porpoising (trailer pushing down on hitch, lifting front tires), and in some cases loss of steering (as wheels could be in the air). IE.. VERY Dangerous.

It sucks, as RV dealerships will tell you anything to make to sale. And most auto dealerships are the same way, I talked to 4 different salespersons at 4 different dealerships, not one knew what the HD payload package was.

Unfortunately, you have bought the truck first, so now you have to find a trailer that works (which will probably not be the trailer you want).

So using your truck (remember your actual payload is probably less),
Your payload 1478# - 400# (driver/passengers?) = 1078#
Now 1078# / 0.13 =8292#. This is the absolute max you could tow, and stay under your capacities. 0.13 = ideal tongue weight for a bumper pull travel trailer. so I would shop for a trailer that has a GVWR of under 8000#. And by shopping for a trailer by GVWR, you (in theory) should have a trailer (while loaded) that meets your capacities, and has a safety margin. Some people shop by actual trailer weight, but it is very hard to estimate how much stuff you'll put in the trailer (and every # put in the trailer, 0.13% of that pound is put on the truck).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you everyone, you have been most helpful! jb eb, thank you for putting it in a way I could comprehend. I purchased the truck knowing that we would have to buy a smaller trailer. Normally we would take the bikes, (Harley's) out to our destination and motel it. We just want to be able to get to a destination sooner to enjoy the ride. I realize that bigger is more luxurious, but we just are stating out on the camping RVing idea. If it isn't all that we think it might be, I won't be out as much, if we find that we really like it, I can always trade up.
 

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No problem.. It seems overwhelming, but it isn't. Just have to do your own research when shopping. No different than a truck purchase.
The part that is frustrating, is you'll see half tons towing everything, including 5th wheel toyhaulers, and more than likely they are all over their trucks capacity. They just don't care, I'm the conservative type, all it takes is one accident (when overloaded), whether its your fault or not, and most insurance companies will drop you instantly, and then a civil lawsuit would follow. Too large of risk for me.

I'm not trying to scare you, as rv'ing IMHO is the best past time. I spend the majority of my summer rv'ing, and the memories we have created with my family will live on for many years.

If u have any more questions feel free to post them or pm me.
 

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Other tricks can be implemented if you are close. Do not travel with water, distribute cargo to maintain the minimum 10% tongue weight (yes more is better hence minimum). The bikes will actually decrease tongue weight of the trailer since they will be loaded at the back. Not much but a little.

Only way to be just is as stated above to load up and weight. I wouldn't put much cargo in the bed of the truck as percentage wise it works to your advantage to put in the trailer near the axles. But again maintain proper tongue weight. And do not exceed the trailer weights.
 
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