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If you are interested, and you want to know what the mechanic is up against to replace those coolant line seals, this fella does a great job of getting the camera view and explaining the steps. (note this is driver's side Turbo)

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you are interested, and you want to know what the mechanic is up against to replace those coolant line seals, this fella does a great job of getting the camera view and explaining the steps. (note this is driver's side Turbo)

yea, I had this cued up before the tire was torqued to spec. I’ll tackle some stuff but it’s just too busy with work right now. Plus, this looks messy, and I hate dealing with fluids anything at home, even oil changes, although I do those.
Can you tell me, is the coolant coming from the main reservoir? Or is this a separate or closed loop?
 

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2022 Powergrid KingRanch in Sparkle White
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You state it's a 2016 Ecoboost F150.
Only one coolant loop on that truck.
You do need to drain the coolant system from what the video states.
And I don't blame anyone for not wanting to tackle this job at home, especially if the truck is several years old and has exhaust related corrosion. Some of those bolts/nuts can snap during disassembly and the job suddenly grows into a bear. :)
 

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Yes.
If you are asking whether the coolant leak you currently have can be monitored/measured by vigilant attention to your coolant expansion tank? I believe so.

If I'm wrong, someone will likely correct me. :)
 

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You state it's a 2016 Ecoboost F150.
Only one coolant loop on that truck.
You do need to drain the coolant system from what the video states.
And I don't blame anyone for not wanting to tackle this job at home, especially if the truck is several years old and has exhaust related corrosion. Some of those bolts/nuts can snap during disassembly and the job suddenly grows into a bear. :)
There’s a small possibility the turbo might need to be replaced. I know the core can get pretty corroded if the coolant has done enough damage over enough time. But it’s most likely just needing a new seal on the coolant line. But don’t be surprised if you need a new turbo.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got a quote for $1500 (CDN) to fix, turbo has to come out so I'm sure that's a huge labour charge.

Truck has been nothing but problems last few months, coming to 160,000km and the transmission module went, $1900. Rear differential pinion seal went, $400. And now the turbo coolant leak, $1500. Dang.
 

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That's 3
If it's true it comes in 3's, you are almost done? :)

But yea, these days even replacing small cost items can cost a fortune in labor.
The transmission module, the seal, and the leaking coolant connector combined aren't that painful in parts cost.

But you gotta pay someone's mortgage to swap the parts out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's 3
If it's true it comes in 3's, you are almost done? :)

But yea, these days even replacing small cost items can cost a fortune in labor.
The transmission module, the seal, and the leaking coolant connector combined aren't that painful in parts cost.

But you gotta pay someone's mortgage to swap the parts out.
Truth

Parts are in order, 7to10 days, hopefully it doesn’t blow before then
 

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Got a quote for $1500 (CDN) to fix, turbo has to come out so I'm sure that's a huge labour charge.

Truck has been nothing but problems last few months, coming to 160,000km and the transmission module went, $1900. Rear differential pinion seal went, $400. And now the turbo coolant leak, $1500. Dang.
That stinks. Yeah, a lot of those parts are cheap, the labor though.. rough.

For instance, my pinion seal went out and it was less than $20 for the part and an hour of my time.
 

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Personally, with that much corrosion, combined with the current estimated repair cost (which I can almost assure you will grow once they get started), this is where I’d be deciding if I like the truck enough to keep it or unload it. If you have no means of repairing this stuff yourself, you’re gonna be sinking some major cash into this over the next couple years if you wait for things to fail. Corrosion like that isn’t forgiving. If you do it the other way, and preventatively replace both turbos and all associated fittings and coolant and oil lines, it’s still gonna be a lot of money.

I’m a mechanic, with a complete shop with lifts at my disposal, and I wouldn’t tackle this in my driveway if I was at gunpoint lol. I just went through this process you’re dealing with when I blew a coolant seal in the right turbo…$5k in parts and probably at least another $5k in labor later (and remember I don’t actually pay labor), and I’m a happy camper…would I do it again? That’s a strong maybe. I almost bought a Tundra over this ordeal and put a blower on it, it was that bad. But mine is a 2012, and a total PITA when it comes to the lines and fittings. It did give me the justification I needed to upgrade every part I ever wanted to, which is why it was ~$5k in parts…. but when I think of the fact I could’ve had a 2018+, tuned it for e50 at about $600, and got almost the same gains? That’s when I question my sanity.

idk man, in the end, it’s your call. Go for the gold, do just enough to keep the wheels turning, or ditch it for your next truck endeavor!
 
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