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I have a 2013 and just changed mine. They were pulled and gapped at about 12,000 miles for a tab at the dealer. I just changed at almost 78,000 miles. That was way too long. The plugs I pulled looked good, but had over a .040 gap on all of them.
I just did a plug change to the sp580. So far so good. Out of curiosity, how many people and a dab of anti seize? I did as it seemed like there was a lot of recommendations to do so, however I had a read a few things poo pooing the use and also seen a few things stating the sp580 does not need it due to plating.

It was the first time changing plugs in my ecoboost, I was surprised at how little 133 in lbs felt as I torqued the plugs down. Seemed almost finger tight.
 

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I have a 2013 and just changed mine. They were pulled and gapped at about 12,000 miles for a tab at the dealer. I just changed at almost 78,000 miles. That was way too long. The plugs I pulled looked good, but had over a .040 gap on all of them.
I just did a plug change to the sp580. So far so good. Out of curiosity, how many people and a dab of anti seize? I did as it seemed like there was a lot of recommendations to do so, however I had a read a few things poo pooing the use and also seen a few things stating the sp580 does not need it due to plating.

It was the first time changing plugs in my ecoboost, I was surprised at how little 133 in lbs felt as I torqued the plugs down. Seemed almost finger tight.
I always add anti seize and have never had a seized plug. And torque by hand.
 

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I have never used anti seize and have never had a seized plug on anything I’ve ever owned and yeah torque by hand is required. Now that isn’t to say I haven’t seen my share of both blown and seized plugs. I’ve re-threaded (Helicoil, Keenserts and the like) many heads. More often than not this problem was caused by the gorilla that last installed them.

Plugs that lived in the cylinder far too long, particularly if the engine used a little oil could get deposit build up on the end of the plug and take threads with them on the way out. If I ever found myself starting to feel a plug like that I’d stop immediately either contact the customer or preferably bring them back into the work bay and show them the circumstance. It was pretty easy to convince a customer that their problem was caused either by a lack of maintenance or the last guy that put them in at this point. I’d let them make the decision on how they wanted to proceed. If I would have gone so far as to actually pull one of these plugs and then tell the customer they weren’t driving it home it became my problem. It’s the age old story of it wasn’t that way when I brought it in. :rolleyes: Same was true of frozen lug nuts.

Here’s a humorous little tid bit. I used to perform a couple to perhaps 4 or 5 tune ups on any given work day. We used to have 50 gallon scrap barrels that we’d throw old shocks, front end parts, drums, rotors etc to take to the metal salvage yard. At one point I had a 50 gallon drum that I and another Tech would throw only spark plugs in. One time we had a 50 gallon drum over half way full of just old spark plugs, it was heavy.

I’m convinced that if every spark plug hole were blown clean before the plug was removed, wiped clean using a little Brake Clean and blown dry, threads chased (using a thread chaser as opposed to a tap) on the ones you could feel needed it, light oil sparingly applied and the plugs were torqued to spec, seized plugs simply wouldn’t happen. Having said all this, I see no problem using a touch of anti-seize if it makes you more confident when you replace your plugs. I’ve heard it said on more than one occasion that using anti-seize on the problematic Triton engine heads made plugs ”fly out of heads” not really a believer of that theory.
 

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I have never used anti seize and have never had a seized plug on anything I’ve ever owned and yeah torque by hand is required. Now that isn’t to say I haven’t seen my share of both blown and seized plugs. I’ve re-threaded (Helicoil, Keenserts and the like) many heads. More often than not this problem was caused by the gorilla that last installed them.

Plugs that lived in the cylinder far too long, particularly if the engine used a little oil could get deposit build up on the end of the plug and take threads with them on the way out. If I ever found myself starting to feel a plug like that I’d stop immediately either contact the customer or preferably bring them back into the work bay and show them the circumstance. It was pretty easy to convince a customer that their problem was caused either by a lack of maintenance or the last guy that put them in at this point. I’d let them make the decision on how they wanted to proceed. If I would have gone so far as to actually pull one of these plugs and then tell the customer they weren’t driving it home it became my problem. It’s the age old story of it wasn’t that way when I brought it in. :rolleyes: Same was true of frozen lug nuts.

Here’s a humorous little tid bit. I used to perform a couple to perhaps 4 or 5 tune ups on any given work day. We used to have 50 gallon scrap barrels that we’d throw old shocks, front end parts, drums, rotors etc to take to the metal salvage yard. At one point I had a 50 gallon drum that I and another Tech would throw only spark plugs in. One time we had a 50 gallon drum over half way full of just old spark plugs, it was heavy.

I’m convinced that if every spark plug hole were blown clean before the plug was removed, wiped clean using a little Brake Clean and blown dry, threads chased (using a thread chaser as opposed to a tap) on the ones you could feel needed it, light oil sparingly applied and the plugs were torqued to spec, seized plugs simply wouldn’t happen. Having said all this, I see no problem using a touch of anti-seize if it makes you more confident when you replace your plugs. I’ve heard it said on more than one occasion that using anti-seize on the problematic Triton engine heads made plugs ”fly out of heads” not really a believer of that theory.
When a guy like Steve dulsich or David freiburger uses anti-seize on their plugs (which I witnessed on the show the other day). I will continue to use it. Those guys have built more engines and changed more plugs than the average Joe.
 
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I know it’s a matter of preference but I’ve never used anti seize In 8 or more spark plug changes I’ve done over the past seven years in three different EcoBoost trucks.


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I’ve heard it said on more than one occasion that using anti-seize on the problematic Triton engine heads made plugs ”fly out of heads” not really a believer of that theory.
No experience with that tale but did have 3 out of 6 plugs blow out on a Hercules 300 6, RR car mover. Pre-ignition blew the porcelain insulators and center electrodes out hard enough to dent the TrackMobile's hood! I was brakeman in the operation and 10 feet away. KM
 

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Let us know if you make it to 100k without misfires


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I have 76K so far on factory plugs and no misfires. Runs so good I'm afraid to touch it.
 

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I have 76K so far on factory plugs and no misfires. Runs so good I'm afraid to touch it.
I made it to at least 60k on my first set... then one day, quite suddenly, hit the pedal and I thought my truck was broke.

Now at the first signs, I just go in there and replace the plugs. 30k or every couple years is no biggie for such a simple, inexpensive procedure.


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I made it to at least 60k on my first set... then one day, quite suddenly, hit the pedal and I thought my truck was broke.

Now at the first signs, I just go in there and replace the plugs. 30k or every couple years is no biggie for such a simple, inexpensive procedure.


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He's old don't question him!
 
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Lol

I'm old and I question myself more than ever.

Or put another way, as the decades stack up, evidence is convincing that I was wrong about so many things in my youth, then early adulthood, then........

At some point I just came to terms with the fact that I have so much to learn.

I'm at 25k on the current set of GearHead acquired plugs. Truck runs fantastic. But they are soon to be replaced.

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I made it to at least 60k on my first set... then one day, quite suddenly, hit the pedal and I thought my truck was broke.

Now at the first signs, I just go in there and replace the plugs. 30k or every couple years is no biggie for such a simple, inexpensive procedure.


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I understand it is simple and inexpensive and I am confident with doing it myself as I have with all my vehicles. I haven't had those first signs.
@snakebitten I do not understand the age comments if it was directed at me. You and I are about the same age.
 

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Wasn't "directed" at anyone specific. I can assure you that!

In fact, you didn't say anything that prompted my silly geezer diatribe.

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I feel it sometimes.
 

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Yes I am a big kid in my head 😂
 
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