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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
That was nothing but Motorcraft Synthetic Blend done by the dealer. No engine issues, still original timing chain and guides. Original CATs. Only replacement was water pump (cuz it was leaking) at 130,000 and passenger valve cover gasket at about 165,000.

When I first had the truck back in 2011, I usually went by the OLM. But I kept it at about 7500 miles. This truck wasn’t babied. It was a tow pig and worked hard.

Till I discovered this forum in 2018 and changed my intervals to every 5000.

Nowadays both trucks get about 3000-4000 intervals. Overkill yes but I use my trucks as intended.
This is kinda what i mean.

As long as you are not flogging your truck, you can run any oil that meets API SP or SN+ and have zero issues as long as you don't run it for 20,000 miles. And why I suggested Supertech for 3000 mile OCIs. Not because I think supertech is the greatest oil ever, or even as good as Valvoline(although I don't have any reason to believe it is not as good or possibly better), but because there won't be a statictically measureable difference between it and a more expensive oil in the normal lifetime of a vehicle.

Some serious neglect occured on @boostkingMatt's 2012.

An oil cannot suck if it meets API SP and Dexos1 Gen 2 as most full-syn 5W-30's do. I would guess that any oil that meets those also meets the Ford spec by default, since I think the Ford spec just reguritates the API spec.

And really, the reason Supertech is cheap is because its bought in mass quantities by Walmart(and by Costco and Amazon with its sister products) and they arn't paying millions of dollars to have Supertech logos plastered all over Nascar. Walmart has basically zero advertising budget. So just because its cheap does not mean its low quality.
 
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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
For those interested in some stout 5W-30's with HTHS >=3.5

170839
 

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That was nothing but Motorcraft Synthetic Blend done by the dealer. No engine issues, still original timing chain and guides. Original CATs. Only replacement was water pump (cuz it was leaking) at 130,000 and passenger valve cover gasket at about 165,000.

When I first had the truck back in 2011, I usually went by the OLM. But I kept it at about 7500 miles. This truck wasn’t babied. It was a tow pig and worked hard.

Till I discovered this forum in 2018 and changed my intervals to every 5000.

Nowadays both trucks get about 3000-4000 intervals. Overkill yes but I use my trucks as intended.
Good to see. As I’ve only have used Synblend. Same as you 3000-4000 intervals. Love to check the inside of my engine but it’s literally been flawless so not willing to take anything apart on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
What exactly is flogging. Could google it I guess. But just wanted to hear it here.
Lots of high temps, lots of high RPM.

The oil is less able to protect the engine as it gets hotter. And the faster you spin the engine, the more stress is applied to the oil inside of the bearings adn the more likely the oil is to sheer.

This is why track oriented motors run 5W-50 which has HTHS values 50% higher than that of 5W-30(see Amsoil specs in first post)
 
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He's messing with ya.

He already revealed he loves to watch westerns.
Flogging that horse to escape the possey is a well known scene in Gunsmoke. :)

Sent from my SM-G988U using Tapatalk
 
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Gunsmoke is a good one.
I guess I definitely don’t flog my motor and I probably don’t do the Italian tune often enough either. Could almost babying it be bad for maybe sludge build up?
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
With regards to the table I posted 6 post ago. I've also added this to the original post:

VII:

Viscosity Index Improvers. This is the stuff they put in the oil to help it be a light weight oil when cold and a heavier weight oil when warm. It helps the oil be the 0 in a 0W-30.

VII's are a sacrifice that is made to lower the weight of the oil when cold to make sure the engine can be cold started and to improve efficiency while the engine is not up to temp. You want less VII if you can get it because VII causes things like higher NOACK and lower HTHS

I alluded to the fact that actual synthetic oils(that use a syntheric base stock) are better in this regard because the POA stocks are naturally better at being lighter when cold. Therefore less VII is added to make them work. This is why you see the 10W-30 Amsoil with almost no NOACK because its viscosity index is low and probably needs almost no VII's to help it out. Thus is doesn't evaporate.

Additionally, the smaller the spread of an oils weight range, the less VII's it needs. A 10W-30 will need less modifcation of the base oil than a 0W-30.
 

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No, I agree with you, I think 3000 miles is a good number. I want to keep my engine as clean as possible. I’ve got a catch can too, and reason being like I just said in the post before this, was my 2012 3.5 I had before this 2.7, and man was it cooked, I’ll have to put a picture up.
Here’s my 2012 3.5 Ecoboosts engine. I had it for only 3 months after buying from the dealer. Had 154k miles on it.
That looks like an engine which has gone 20,000 miles between oil drains.
 

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That looks like an engine which has gone 20,000 miles between oil drains.
Yah it was sad. It was such a cool truck, it had the FX4 trim and heated and cooled seats etc. It was in limp mode from the day I bought it, I just didn’t know what an Ecoboost felt like power wise because that was the first one I drove.
 

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Has anyone actually done an Oil Analysis on Motorcraft Synthetic Blend and Full Synthetic?

What if Motorcraft’s SB is just like every other off-the-shelf brand “Full Synthetic”? They just followed the rules of listing it as a “Blend” since it’s not a true full synthetic. The SB uses synthetic/hydrogen base oils.

Then their Motorcraft Full Synethic is a true Full Synthetic like others. Who knows. I am crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Took the leap:



Pennzoil has a $22 rebate right now for 2 x 5qt jugs. I paid $21.97 per 5 qt jug so basically got 10 qts for $22.

My next oil change will cost me $13.20.

 

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I run the Motul 8100 X-Clean in my wife's 2018 turbo Forrester because it was highly recommended for their turbo DI engines on Forester forum. Now I see why. I am running the Mobil ESP in my truck. Mainly because like Mass-Hole they had a pretty good rebate and I found a place that had it on a pretty good sale. Bought 4-cases for less than Walmart sells Mobil 1 oil for. Last change I did add 2 qts, of 0w-40. When it runs completely out I think that is what I will stay with 0w-40.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I run the Motul 8100 X-Clean in my wife's 2018 turbo Forrester because it was highly recommended for their turbo DI engines on Forester forum. Now I see why. I am running the Mobil ESP in my truck. Mainly because like Mass-Hole they had a pretty good rebate and I found a place that had it on a pretty good sale. Bought 4-cases for less than Walmart sells Mobil 1 oil for. Last change I did add 2 qts, of 0w-40. When it runs completely out I think that is what I will stay with 0w-40.
Turbo Subaru people have weird obsessions with oil. I had a 2007 Legacy GT and, at that time, Rotella T6 was the oil of choice.

But I don't think the obsession was without reason though, as there were a lot of oil related failures earlier on, but that was less about the oil and more about the engine designs. I know there were some issues with the boxer design and how the oil would line the cylinder walls and then there were rampant turbo failures on the 1st gen Legacy GT. Basically people were running crazy oils to mask some issues with the motors. My buddy had a 2012 WRX, bone stock, that needed new heads at 60k miles because the valve guides and seats were gone.

I wanna believe the newer FA20DIT in the WRX and Forester XT is a much better motor than the EJ25, but I honestly don't know anything about it as it was just coming out when I left the Subaru world.
 
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Turbo Subaru people have weird obsessions with oil. I had a 2007 Legacy GT and, at that time, Rotella T6 was the oil of choice.

But I don't think the obsession was without reason though, as there were a lot of oil related failures earlier on, but that was less about the oil and more about the engine designs. I know there were some issues with the boxer design and how the oil would line the cylinder walls and then there were rampant turbo failures on the 1st gen Legacy GT. Basically people were running crazy oils to mask some issues with the motors. My buddy had a 2012 WRX, bone stock, that needed new heads at 60k miles because the valve guides and seats were gone.

I wanna believe the newer FA20DIT in the WRX and Forester XT is a much better motor than the EJ25, but I honestly don't know anything about it as it was just coming out when I left the Subaru world.
You’re dead on about the obsession. Coming from a modified WRX that ran flawlessly on Rotella T6 for the 7 years I had it, it’s tempting for me to put it in the F150.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
You’re dead on about the obsession. Coming from a modified WRX that ran flawlessly on Rotella T6 for the 7 years I had it, it’s tempting for me to put it in the F150.
Dont. I talk about that in my first post.

Rotella T6 used to be API SM rated and could be used in gasoline motors without issue. Fast Forward to the last 5-6 years when API moved on to SN+ and SP ratings and Rotella no longer meets the requirements. This is most likely because it cannot meet the LSPI requirements which are specifically for GTDI motors like the Ecoboosts.

It was fine to run it in older EJ25 motors because they were lower compression and didn't spool up at 1500 rpm's like the Ecoboost do. EJ255's only had a 8.4:1 compression ratio while the 2017+ Ecoboosts are 10.5:1.
 
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Subaru had a little screen that was installed in the oil fittings(called a banjo bolt I think) to the turbo on the first GEN 2.5L. It would start clogging off and take the turbo out. They dropped the banjo bolts out around 2006 or 2007 I think. The DI engines I think suffer the same valve coking that the Ford 1st Gen 3.5L do, or so some say. Her 2018 Forester XT is a Touring and replaced a 2011 Forester XT Touring. The 2011 left our house with 153k, nothing but service and a set of brake pads. No kidding! Used nothing but Mobil 1 0w-40 on it. Originally doing 7.5k changes but switched the interval to 6k when it got over 100k. Oil looked as if it was getting mighty dark on the changes. I hope that 2.0L is as good. It is faster and does get about 3.5mpg more too! I don't think it could run with my 2.7L though, lol! My little woman doe love it!
 

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Lots of high temps, lots of high RPM.

The oil is less able to protect the engine as it gets hotter. And the faster you spin the engine, the more stress is applied to the oil inside of the bearings adn the more likely the oil is to sheer.

This is why track oriented motors run 5W-50 which has HTHS values 50% higher than that of 5W-30(see Amsoil specs in first post)
depends on oil though, i have saw the motorcraft 5-50 shear very quickly. i would not want that in my engine in HPDE
 
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