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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all


Just an update on my towing dilemma. I have a new 35' travel trailer at 8200#. But with the tongue weight and with family loaded, it exceeds the GVWR. I'm a big guy and with family, snacks, food, stabilizer hitch weight, tonneau cover, bed liner, and food it gets close to or slightly exceeds the weight.

I've added airbags which does help with stability, but with wind it becomes a little scary with the swaying. My CURT weight distribution hitch does a good job to ensure I don't exceed the axle limit but GVWR is a concern. I also have a short box which is also added to the isse.4

My dealership will take my 2012 FX4 SCREW back on trade for a 2013 F-350 Lariat Diesel for an extra 375 a month. And I know that will tow my trailer hands down.

So - what to do? Take the trade or do the airbags address the GVWR?

Ed
 

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Air bags do not increase GVW, they will level and improve the ride, but do not increase any weight limits. As for going to a F350 diesel that maybe a bit of overkill depending on how you make use of your truck on an everyday basis. Not only will your payments go up so will your maintenance and fuel cost. As may your insurance and registration cost. Most states base registration cost on the GVW of a vehicle over a set limit.
You could maybe get buy with a F250 6.2 gas V8 or look into loading your trailer and supplies lighter.
 

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What will they give you toward a new EcoBeast with a longer bed and the MaxTow and HD payload packages? Also, have you tried adjusting the load in your trailer to lighten the tongue a little to save on payload weight? I tow a 36 foot TT that is pushing 9k fully loaded. I am a big guy too (260lbs). I travel with my wife and 4 kiddos in my shortbed maxtow. I have had no problems towing with both the Andersen and the ProPride hitches. The only thing that ever induced sway on my combo has been heavy crosswinds with the Andersen and that isnt a problem since I bought the ProPride. If I was in your shoes, I would trade in on a 2013 with MaxTow and HD payload package. Then I would invest is a different hitch set-up such as the Equalizer, Husky Centerline, Andersen, or if you wanna spend the big bucks a ProPride.

This would be a much less expensive route and should yield excellent results. Your daily driving fuel economy, and ride quality will be much better!

SPPD
 

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Sounds like you need to look at a 2013 F150 Supercrew 6.5ft bed with HD Payload Pkg and Max Tow Pkg. That should give you the specs you need to do things safely.
 

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I have a 2013 F-150 CC FX4 short bed ecoboost with the max tow package and pull a toy hauler trailer which is 7,800 lbs dry and loaded is close to my trucks 11,200 weight rating. The first time I pulled my trailer it was scary in the wind. I put on firestone air bags and Michelin load range E tires. It now feels fine in the wind, the tires made a big difference and have a max air pressure of 80 psi, the factory Bridgestones had a max air pressure of 44 psi and the door tag said to run 35 psi
 

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Now there is a direction that I didn't think of addressing....tires. Getting some rubber under the truck with enough payload and stiffer sidewalls to help remove some of the added sway of the under rated OEM tires.
 

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10 ply tires will definitely help with some sway issues but I think the trailer is a little too long for your wheelbase. Also don't look at the GVWR look at the GCWR which is the total of the truck, trailer and contents. I have seen and read about people being pulled over and scaled by the weight police. The trailer was within weight 'spec' but the total was over the GCWR and problems arose.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
10 ply tires will definitely help with some sway issues but I think the trailer is a little too long for your wheelbase. Also don't look at the GVWR look at the GCWR which is the total of the truck, trailer and contents. I have seen and read about people being pulled over and scaled by the weight police. The trailer was within weight 'spec' but the total was over the GCWR and problems arose.
Yep, pretty close to or just over GCWR, and I have the short wheel base (4.5' box) and crappy tires and a long trailer. I did install the Firestone airbags which really firmed up the rear but it doesn't address the fact I have a SWB truck, long trailer, and maxed out GCWR. Sort of the Swiss-cheese effect. Lots of small holes that when lined up cause my issue. And since its a safety one, I need to upgrade. Since I can do that with a diesel F-350 at the same cost to upgrading to a new F-150 Eco with HD payload and Max tow, why not?

And everyone, thanks for all your help and opinions - they really helped me suss out the final decision.

Cheers,

Ed
 

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Let us know how the new EB works out with your situation.
I read his last post as he decided to go with the 350.

SPPD
 

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Sway is caused far more by the way the trailer & truck are setup rather than getting all H.D. equipment. I pulled a 30' trailer with a 8000 lb + tongue weight across the country with a standard short bed truck. You can have sway with a very little trailer and a 1 ton truck if set up poorly.

Oh Well... here we go!


1. Adjust the trailer jack until it measures level to the ground from the front of the frame to the rear of the frame & measure the ball socket on the hitch/or get the accurate ball height from the manufacturer. 2. If... you have an adjustable hitch head adjust it to as close as you can to that ball height. When in doubt go to the next highest adjustment hole. 3. Hook the trailer on to your ball and let it down enough to free up the hitch lock, & will let the hitch lock slide forward & lock. Make sure it is locked 3. When locked securely, put on chains for safety & then lift up the trailer & rear of truck a few inches with the trailer jack to make it easier to lift up the equalizer bars. Stop when it gets hard to turn the jack crank. 4. Pick a link that your are going to put on the hook of the bracket on the trailer frame & (then straighten the chain & "drop" the other links down while holding the link that will go on the bracket hook in your fingers) so the links drop out of the way and don't get jammed in the chain. When both equalizer bars are on, raise the trailer jack and let all the weight rest on the truck. 5. Stand back and look at the trailer & truck. The goal is to have the frame of the trailer "slightly" lower in the front & the frame of the truck level. Try repeating the process and "dropping" different numbers of links to get to that goal. If a ridiculous amount of pressure is necessary to get the front of the trailer & the rear of the truck up you may not have enough spring for the tongue weight. Hopefully that will not be a problem, not likely. If it is, I recommend a set of standard overload springs like you find on 1 ton trucks. Why? Because overloads will not affect the ride of your truck until enough weight is put on the hitch (the trailer weight) while you are driving around town. Other types of springs stiffen up the ride all the time! 6. One last note, make sure the angle of the adjustable head is right vertically. Hopefully the people who sold you the trailer should have set that up right. The angle of the head will make the equalizer bars more or less parallel to the ground and therefore put more or less pressure on the chains lifting the trailer. The more the hitch head leans forward towards the truck bumper & 90 degrees the more level horizonally the bars will be creating less lifting pressure on the chains. Usually you want the hitch head tilted away from the truck a little and the bars running slightly downward from the truck. A good hitch place can help you with that if you get confused. 7. Get a friction sway bar (or two if necessary/ they go on reversed in position on each side of the "A" frame) and learn to adjust it based on wind and driving condition. I keep them fairly tight when windy! Loosen it completely when backing up the trailer or turning very sharply or it will fight you especially in dirt or gravel. 8. Make sure the hitch on the truck is rated for the tongue weight! I bent the hell out of a GM hitch and had to replace it on a trip because it would not hold a 900 lb. hitch weight!


Do this and you'll find out what's what! It will probably turn out just fine!


Hope this helps! Somebody helped me years ago when I started. Now, it's my turn!
 
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