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I started a thread in the Suspension section on whether leveling kits would cause a reduction in gas mileage called Leveling Kit and Gas Mileage. One of the comments on the thread prompted this thread. In the thread, Sub_Elect stated that his "suspension was noticeably softer" while towing his 5,000 boat. Thanks Sub_Elect for making me think about this. So, my dilemma is while I would like the extra height in the front-end, I do not want to do it if it will deteriorate my towing experience.

So, for those of you that tow and have leveled your F-150, have you noticed any differences (good or bad) in your towing experience?

In my case, I tow a 31’ travel trailer that weighs approximately 8,000 pounds with an Equalizer E4 weight distributing hitch. I also tow a 4,000 boat twice a year (to and from the lake). But not quite as worried about that. My main concern is the towing experience with a leveling kit and my heavy travel trailer.

So, basically I want to have my cake (no change in MPG) and eat it too (no sacrifice in towing experience). Is this possible or am I asking too much?
 

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i have no erperiance pulling travel trailers with equalier hitches. but my four wheeler trailer loaded is about 2500 pounds and it squats pretty good. but the leveling kit doesnt effect that at all, just at night your head lights might be a little high.
 

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I have 9k lbs fifth wheel travel trailer, I'm still using my step-father's diesel to tow it around. But, I will be setting my truck up to tow it, and I'm definitely investing in a set of airbags. You should look in to these, they're fairly cheap and greatly reduce wear on your shocks and springs while towing heavy loads.
 

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If it was the comment that I read then it sounded like the boat may not correctly set on the trailer. The poster stated that he had a soft feel in the suspension which could mean excessive tongue weight. I towed my dump trailer 2500lbs loaded with 3600lbs of demolition materials within the first 200 miles of owning my new truck. Someone who was assisting the hookup commented on how little the truck dropped when I put the trailer on. Towing was a breeze.
Generally speaking the tongue weight should not be excessive and be around 10% of the trailer weight.
So on a 5000lb trailer you should have no more then 500lbs. This should not make your truck handle different.
If you alter your truck with a leveling kit and tow a lot of weight constantly you may consider adding a leaf to the rear end or putting on some sort of assist like Timbren suspension kits or an air ride suspension. Timbren is nice because it is nothing more then a modified bump stop and it effectively stops rear sag by putting the weight on your axle and stopping your leaf springs from taking the load.
I just put my Rancho leveling shocks on yesterday and what a difference, now if I load the back up or tow with any weight on the back end I will probably have some squat in the back end because the truck sits perfectly level. This will not be any different then before the lift and should not alter the way that the truck handles, unless the tongue weight is excessive.
Hope this helps.
 

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If it was the comment that I read then it sounded like the boat may not correctly set on the trailer. The poster stated that he had a soft feel in the suspension which could mean excessive tongue weight. I towed my dump trailer 2500lbs loaded with 3600lbs of demolition materials within the first 200 miles of owning my new truck. Someone who was assisting the hookup commented on how little the truck dropped when I put the trailer on. Towing was a breeze.
Generally speaking the tongue weight should not be excessive and be around 10% of the trailer weight.
So on a 5000lb trailer you should have no more then 500lbs. This should not make your truck handle different.
If you alter your truck with a leveling kit and tow a lot of weight constantly you may consider adding a leaf to the rear end or putting on some sort of assist like Timbren suspension kits or an air ride suspension. Timbren is nice because it is nothing more then a modified bump stop and it effectively stops rear sag by putting the weight on your axle and stopping your leaf springs from taking the load.
I just put my Rancho leveling shocks on yesterday and what a difference, now if I load the back up or tow with any weight on the back end I will probably have some squat in the back end because the truck sits perfectly level. This will not be any different then before the lift and should not alter the way that the truck handles, unless the tongue weight is excessive.
Hope this helps.
Weight distribution makes a huge difference when towing. Well said.
 

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I would tell you that if you were planning on pulling anything with any weight to it that you should leave a little "rake" in your suspension. If you are planning on pulling a lot of weight then I would add air bags or timbrens. I had a 2" front leveling kit and there was a soft feel to the suspension. That truck was completely level. I have a 1.5 inch kit in my new truck and there is a bit of rake. I got brighted by people often enough to get annoyed with the last 2" kit. I dont have that problem so much anymore with the new truck. As far as the softer feeling suspension in my new truck, its not as bad, but I will be installing the air bags before I buy my 5th wheel next summer. As to the comment posted above about the undistributted weight in my boat, that is not the case with this rig, weight is distrubutted fine.
 

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I leveled an 04 fx4 that I towed 5500-6500lbs each day and it simply caused the truck to sit upwards slightly. I had no issues with control or braking. I actually got to where I could come up to a turn, turn into the turn and floor it when it was wet, and slide that truck over to the 3rd lane perfectly trailer and all. Guy in the truck with me thought that was the koolest truck ever.
 

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My truck sits nearly level with my fifth wheel hitched up on stock suspension. However if you leveled your truck before hooking a load up it would cause your front end to be higher. This does affect stability, stopping, and of course your blinding others with your headlights. I would suggest against the leveling if your going to be towing.
 

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Just got my truck aligned. Although camber was not off after adding the leveling shocks, the caster adjustment was way out of spec.
What really bothered me though was finding out that Ford neglected to put a camber adjustment on our trucks. When, and it will, the camber goes out you have to purchase new cam bolts for the upper control arm. IMHO that is a bunch of BS and just shows why American made vehicles are trailing foreign ones in quality and dependability. First the grill missing in front of the inter-cooler and now this.
prime81- yes the headlights are now higher as I noticed last night. Easy fix is just drive up to a building adjust them down until they look right. It may take a couple of adjustments but eventually you can get them back to or close to stock. When your hauling a trailer your doing the same thing, any squat of the rear end at night blinds oncoming traffic. I beam people all the time at a distance that are towing. Then when they get closer and I see the trailer I know why.
 

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No change in towing performance for me. Prior to my level and tires, the stock truck towing felt like it would wander a bit and was soft through corners. Ii think that was just the spungy Goodyear tires , once I leveled it and added load range E tires, it now feels more stable like towing with a 3/4 or 1 ton chassis. No complaints other than the squat in the rear with tongue weight now that the front end is higher. But airbags are also in my near future, just make sure to adjust your headlight height
 
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