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Even 11-14 trucks with the brown PCV get fluid in the intercooler though
That is correct as the intercooler is basically a giant catch can and all that hot vapor has only two directions to go. BUT the amount is significantly less compared to what it was. That’s why many people noticed less gunk coming out of their “weep” hole.
 

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What if I removed the check valve between the passenger valve cover and the catch can? Swapped to the brown pcv. Think this would help with more flow?

CJ
 

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The brown pcv already flows more than enough. It also acts to meter the amount of vacuum. If you gutted or removed the pcv , while still attached to the IM, you would have a large vacuum leak.
 

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My question was not very clear.
if I removed the check valve from my catchcan system. On the passenger side. Would that help flow?
So the vacuum is really only pulling through one valve the pcv.
getting rid of the catch can valve with the idea that it restricts flow.
the reason for the brown would be to help seal better when in boost.
 

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If you are running a single valve then yes you can remove the check valve. Dual valve no. It all depends on the kit. The check valve really only prevents the catch can from being pressurized. Most kits like jlt, radium, and Mishimoto are all able to be pressurized. Hence why they don’t include check valves.

11-14 Mishimoto kit included a check valve for the original pcv valve that leaked. 15+ have no check valve.
 

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I have the UPR big can dual valve.
there is a valve between the intake manifold and the pass valve cover. It’s between the can and pcv.
the other is between the can and turbo intake tube and T to the driver valve cover.
Correct me if I’m wrong. When in boost, the pressure goes to the can and stops at the check valves. The check valve going to the pass pcv and the valve going to the turbo intake tube.
My idea was to remove the check valve between the can and pcv.Or am I way off base...??
Thanks for being patient with me.
 

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No I’m sorry I don’t believe you can remove the check valves with that setup as it’s a dual valve.
 

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Not both valves just the one for the pass side. It seems redundant.
Thanks for you help. I appreciate it.
 

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Just a heads up to 11-12 trucks that are running a catch can(with check valves) and/or the brown valve. It effects the functionality of the BPVs. Due to the stiffer spring in the valve, less vacuum is available in the manifold. Whenever the throttle closes vacuum runs down to each Turbos BPV allowing them to function releasing boost in-front of the turbos prespooling them(after a shift).That provides the amazing throttle response and low end torque.

But when the BPV cannot function properly/efficiently the turbo has to spool all the way back to its target again when the throttle re-opens. That’s why many owners after switching to the valve noticed lower boost and poor fuel economy. Hence why sometimes the truck feels like a dog down low and/or after a shift.

And in some cases, I found if the BPV did not vent the boost it actually found its way back into the crankcase pressurizing it.

13+ have no issues at all as that’s the year ford switched to the single BOV on the Intercooler. Which I recommend switching to the new valve. As some trucks came stock with it from the factory.
Is this occurring with the FR setup on 11-12?


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No because the Full Race Catch Can removes the pcv connection to the manifold. Vacuum does not become effected at all with that setup. In fact almost guarantees enough vacuum is always supplied . That brings up in the past when Geoff explained why they went this route so that vacuum signals would not be messed with. It all makes sense.

But 13+ do not have this issue at all due to ford switching the BPV to the intercooler and making it electronically controlled.
 

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Are there any other "catch-can" kits that follow the same design logic as FR?

I only ask because I figured you have looked closely at a few of them? (you're such a vacuum nerd, if you know what I mean. I mean that with all due respect)

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Are there any other "catch-can" kits that follow the same design logic as FR?

I only ask because I figured you have looked closely at a few of them? (you're such a vacuum nerd, if you know what I mean. I mean that with all due respect)

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To be frank with you, all the other kits just strictly focus on catching the “blowby”. Which is the whole idea of a catch can. But it seems Full Race was the only company to take into consideration the operation of the engine. They primarily focused on crankcase ventilation as well. I even tested just putting a breather on the pcv valve(gutted) with the manifold connection capped and that even felt better.

I tested some single valve setups. Some kept the functionality intact while others were either too restrictive or the lines were too long. The main factor that caused the most issues was check valves.

Don’t get me wrong, having a catch can sounds like an amazing idea. But I’d rather wager drivability over catching some drops of fuel vapors/blowby.

Again 13+ do not have this issue. Only 11-12 due to the fact that BPVs require a manifold vacuum source( Green Vacuum line).

 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
Could this be compensated for by using the adjustable kompact valves?
 

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Could this be compensated for by using the adjustable kompact valves?
I’m not sure as the factory valves already have the quickest reaction to manifold changes. As they are a very light rubber diaphragm. Hence why many OEs follow that path. But downside of them is you cannot push crazy power without rupturing the diaphragm.

The kompact recirculating shortie valves are set to OEM spec but they do have a tad slower reaction due to their piston design. They work but you’d have the same issue.

The adjustable valves I’m not too entirely sure. I’d imagine the softest setting is for the stock boost level. But still with less than the desirable amount of vacuum available in the manifold, the valve still wouldn’t function properly.

Ideally on the 11-12s you want to recirculate and not VTA as the recirculating actually helps spool the turbo. Reducing any turbo lag. That’s why ford placed the BPV vents in front of the turbos.
 

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The PCV is a vacuum metering device. If too much vacuum is put on the crankcase and the valve is removed, you will suck up oil.

It’s best to get one installed when you get the chance. UPR even no longer recommends gutting the pcv valve.

A system that removes the intake manifold connection is the only one suitable for the removal of the pcv valve.
How does this work if you have a CSS? In that case, if a tremendous vacuum pulls on the crank, it just gets backfilled by the css. I know for a fact that when i put my regular oil cap back on my truck the crank went under pretty high vacuum and when i pulled the cap off(with decent effort) there was a “woosh” of air back into the engine.
 

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How does this work if you have a CSS? In that case, if a tremendous vacuum pulls on the crank, it just gets backfilled by the css. I know for a fact that when i put my regular oil cap back on my truck the crank went under pretty high vacuum and when i pulled the cap off(with decent effort) there was a “woosh” of air back into the engine.
If you’re getting a swoosh then your CSS or clean side vent isn’t providing enough air to backfill. That or your pcv valve is stuck open. Meaning something is effecting it’s flow causing it to be open at idle. That’s why it’s under high vacuum.The pcv valve is there to prevent that large amount of vacuum to be in the crankcase. They said if too much vacuum is pulled then it effects oil pressure and locations where oil is critical. Not only that but your catch can would fill very quickly of just oil and not blowby. The manifold provides a very very very strong suction. That’s directly what I was told from UPR.


This is the flow diagram of the current pcv valve. If something is reducing the amount of vacuum on the pcv then the valve is being opened when it shouldn’t be. Then that means higher vacuum is being pulled thru the crankcase.
 

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If you’re getting a swoosh then your CSS or clean side vent isn’t providing enough air to backfill. That or your pcv valve is stuck open. Meaning something is effecting it’s flow causing it to be open at idle. That’s why it’s under high vacuum.The pcv valve is there to prevent that large amount of vacuum to be in the crankcase. They said if too much vacuum is pulled then it effects oil pressure and locations where oil is critical. Not only that but your catch can would fill very quickly of just oil and not blowby. The manifold provides a very very very strong suction. That’s directly what I was told from UPR.


This is the flow diagram of the current pcv valve. If something is reducing the amount of vacuum on the pcv then the valve is being opened when it shouldn’t be. Then that means higher vacuum is being pulled thru the crankcase.
It was not wooshing with the CSS. It was when I put the regular/stock oil cap on while idling with the RX dual can that I got vacuum. With the CSS it seems normal which I assume is because there is a constant air flow into the oil fill.

But yes, it seems like my PCV was open allowing a good amount of vacuum to be pulled on the case. I only tried this briefly a few months ago. With the CSS the crank should be backfilling with clean air from the intake.

It is the original PCV(brown) with about 90k miles now though. I wonder if its just old and tired. I may try replacing it.
 

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Oh yeah I would be careful doing that. You could easily suck in seals LOL and or cause a bit of damage. Yeah the dual valves rely heavily on the CSS to be connected. As does the stock setup.

The check valves and long lines seem to effect the amount of vacuum supplied to the pcv valve. As seen from the diagram above, the valve is suppose to be almost closed when there is high vacuum.
 
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