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Oh yeah I would be careful doing that. You could easily suck in seals LOL and or cause a bit of damage. Yeah the dual valves rely heavily on the CSS to be connected. As does the stock setup.

The check valves and long lines seem to effect the amount of vacuum supplied to the pcv valve. As seen from the diagram above, the valve is suppose to be almost closed when there is high vacuum.
I thought the CSS was optional though. I remember it being an add on. But that was like 5 years ago so who knows.
 

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I don’t believe they fully thought the kit thru. He did copy paste information to each and every forum saying all engines have improper crankcase venting.

The css is used so that the WOT line pulls fresh air thru the crankcase when under boost. Ideally it sounds like a great idea. But it basically makes the crankcase atmospheric all the time since it’s now an open system. If it used the stock clean side vent connected to the turbo inlet, the ability for the WOT line to function is out the door. Defeating the purpose of using a dual valve as now it wouldn’t be pulling fresh air thru the crankcase.

The downside of a dual valve is it removes the ability for the the crankcase to see vacuum like the stock setup. Stock setup makes it a closed system under boost since the pcv side is closed and the turbo is sucking on the clean side. With the crankcase under vacuum while under boost, it aids ring seal which minimizes blowby. Not only that but helps in power production as well.

Overall you actually produce more blowby with a dual valve than stock setup.
 

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I really need to just create another thread....

Edit: Continuing my knowledge to another thread.

 

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I have a 2017 Fusion Sport with the 2.7L EcoBoost - the engine is 99% identical to the 15-16 F-150 2.7L EcoBoost engines. The differences are minor: Turbo packaging and that's about it. The compressor maps are identical as are the VE models.

April of 2019 I installed the new EV-297 PCV valve, the one that superseded the older EV-290 PCV valve that was used on a lot of EcoBoost engines (brown color, same as EV-297). My 2014 Taurus 3.5L EcoBoost used this from the factory and as a replacement (I was able to buy an extra back around 2016), and my 2017 Fusion Sport came from the factory with the EV-290 brown PCV. I installed the EV-297 after learning this was a newer PCV that was recommended for reducing carbon deposits on intake valves, etc...

But since this EV-297 was installed, I could swear my idle has not been very good during cold starts. It has progressed worse to the point it wants to stall out during cold driving (it's fine when totally warmed up). The misfire count is very high just from idling during a cold start as it warms up. This is with the factory stock tuning. I tried changing spark plugs and moving coil packs around, but it was misfiring a lot of cyl 6 and now it does it mainly on 4, and some on 3 and 5.

I cannot find EV-290 valves for sale anywhere, they all have been superseded by EV-297. Maybe the newer EcoBoost engines that come with EV-297 run fine on them, but I have an extra EV-290 that I plan to install on my 2.7 and see how that goes. I see that EV-289 is still for sale (the black PCV used on early 12-15 3.5L EcoBoost trucks).

As for the check-valve breathing test... The EV-290 acts as a total check valve, I cannot push any of my breathe through (to simulate boost) but the newer EV-297 does allow SOME leakage. Keep in mind both EV-290 and EV-297 are brown in color. You must look at the base of it for a laser engraved marking that indicates which model it is. It will say EV-290 or EV-298 (yes EV-298) which is EV-297.
 

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I thought I would go ahead and update this thread(Even tho it’s not mine) with my findings.

I was able to contact one of the Head Ecoboost engineers who now is head of the Ranger platform and he provided me with any/all information I needed.

The improved PCV was created to correct the crankcase flow thru the crankcase while preventing the crankcase from being pressurized. With it sealing under boost, it actually allows the clean side vent(connected to the turbo inlet) to become more effective. Improved ring seal meaning less blowby and more effective power. Also keeping the oil clean.

With the new design of the plunger, it specifically was design to allow only fuel vapors and not oil to pass into the manifold. The fuel vapors/contaminants passed actually evaporate within minutes if you wanted to test the theory. The idea behind the fuel vapors passing is if the vapor travels fast enough in its form, buildup would never occur or at least slow the process. Later years you notice the pcv hose becoming shorter and closer to the manifold to lessen the chance of the vapor condensing. In its gas form it’s easily combustible.

The reasoning behind the oil found in the intercooler was due to the fact that the original pcv did not have a successful rate at closing under boost. Blowing boost into the crankcase pushing oil out of the clean side vent. The original pcv was fords 1st take on limiting the amount of blowby sucked into the chamber. It was apparently too effective and for those that never drove the truck intended, oil would rise due to contamination. With the revised pcv the only thing being put into the intercooler is fuel vapors from combustion. Little to no oil should be observed and will not effect combustion at all.

With the design of the crankcase ventilation, the ecoboost motors will never experience positive crankcase pressure. UNLESS the pcv were to fail ,no vent was provided, internal damage etc. He even stated the stock crankcase ventilation is good for even more power. Example being the GT and Raptor. But if pushing larger numbers then improvements can be made.

Overall I was very thankful with him providing answers I have been searching for months. With the knowledge he provided I will be starting another thread regarding correct crankcase ventilation.

Anyone with a 11-14 F150 3.5 I highly recommend throwing in the improved PCV :KR3Z-6A666-A. Following the change it is best to perform a KAM reset.
This is cool information, as I posted above there are two brown PCV valves for the EcoBoost engines: EV-290 and EV-297. Everything has been superseded by EV-297. The EV-290 doesn't let anything through under my lung boost, but EV-297 has some slight leakage. The Fusion Sport comes with EV-290 but when you go to buy a replacement, the catalogs at Ford all point to EV-297 and I cannot find EV-290 anywhere. My 2014 SHO (Gen 1 Transverse 3.5) came with EV-290 as well. I can still find EV-289 (the black one). I thought it was my imagination that my Fusion Sport idled poorly when cold using the new EV-297 but reading this thread, I think it may be the source of the issue. I have one extra EV-290 that I can swap in.

Are you guys re-using your PCV valves? Does it matter that the locking tabs break during removal?
 

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EV290 and EV297(EV298) are identical. Only difference is the the stamping on the side of the part. Same exact flow curve and everything. The p/n or service number was just changed due to its use on many vehicles now.

The reason your fusion may be struggling is due to the fact the brand new valve is simply flowing more since it’s brand new. The car is thinking there’s a vacuum leak. It will take time for the car to adjust and/or for the valve spring to settle. This is what I noticed in a few trucks that made the switch over to the brown valve. Vacuum signals were wack.

Your new valve should not leak at all. If it is then it’s defective. The black EV289 valve had a “calibrated” leak whenever boost was applied. It however didn’t actually cause any crankcase pressure. Whatever pressure created was easily sucked out by the turbo inlet. There’s more to this that I just have not posted.

In an ideal world the pcv valve will work if removed once or twice. But the O-ring that seals the valve to the valve cover will no longer seal. Hence why it’s not recommended to play with it lol. The locking tabs serve the purpose of keeping the valve in place. Nothing too critical.
 

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I've had that EV-297 in the Fusion for almost 2 years now, and the weird cold idling and misfires isn't getting better. So EV-290 and EV-297 are completely identical? What happens if I try an EV-289 on that 2.7? Will I get more carbon buildup on the intake valves / oil going into the intercooler?

And I have a brand new EV-290 and a brand new EV-297 at my desk, I'm blowing through them and the EV-297 leaks just a tad using my lung boost.
 

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They are completely identical.

The EV289 was designed for performance in mind. Which is why Dodge also used the same valve in the hellcats. Just with different mounting.

It’s designed to keep the fuel mixture as clean as possible. More so designed to replace the need of a”catch can”. I’ve actually been running it in my 2018 raptor for the past two months and the truck just feels more powerful. Slight mpg gain as well. You will however get more blowby out the cleanside vent. Not due to crankcase pressure but due to the fact that the vapors will now favor the suction of the turbo rather than being dispersed.

Downside of the valve is it wasn’t meant for those that didn’t drive the vehicle hard. Fuel dilution etc. Which led to Ford switching to the EV290/EV297/EV298 valve which was already being used in the SHO, Explorer,
 

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To put it in simple terms, they used EV289 to minimize the chances of blowby affecting the fuel mixture. Which would lower carbon buildup etc.

Rather than have more issues of consumers not the driving the truck as intended, they took the safe route using the EV290/297/298 on all the trucks.
 

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On the Gen 1 transverse 3.5 EcoBoost (SHO/Explorer Sport), the cleanside was a very simple setup: straight tube from valve cover to the air tube. On the 2.7L EcoBoost, there seems to be some valves/sensors in-line with that cleanside tube. Is there any chance that those components would help mitigate blowby? Would the excess blowby cause more moisture/oil buildup in the intercooler? I've already drilled a 1/16" hole in the cold-side part of my intercooler and there's always oil coming out.

I use 5k mile oil change intervals and do drive the Fusion Sport hard as it is my fair weather vehicle. What's your advice on using the EV-289 on the Fusion Sport?
 

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That sensor is strictly for emissions. It measures the amount of vacuum provided to the crankcase(from turbo inlet) to ensure the fumes are being sucked out when in boost. A plus of having this sensor is that it gives the user a heads up if the crankcase ventilation is messed up or something is wrong.

In all honesty you could simply swap in the valve and see how the car reacts.

Moisture in the intercooler is strictly due to design. Yes blowby may ever so slightly accelerate it but it’s solely due to the design.

The main thing is just allowing the vehicle to hit its design temperature of 212. That ensures any moisture and contaminants in the crankcase are being burned off.
 

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That sensor is strictly for emissions. It measures the amount of vacuum provided to the crankcase(from turbo inlet) to ensure the fumes are being sucked out when in boost. A plus of having this sensor is that it gives the user a heads up if the crankcase ventilation is messed up or something is wrong.

In all honesty you could simply swap in the valve and see how the car reacts.

Moisture in the intercooler is strictly due to design. Yes blowby may ever so slightly accelerate it but it’s solely due to the design.

The main thing is just allowing the vehicle to hit its design temperature of 212. That ensures any moisture and contaminants in the crankcase are being burned off.
I picked up an EV-289 and it looks like the internal orifice is larger in diameter than the EV-290/EV-297. Unless there is some voodoo engineering going on, with traditional PCV's (like the ones on the Modular V8s or the SB 302/351W V8s) if the orifice is larger the flow is going to be greater.
 

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The larger orifice does not correlate to a higher flow with these valves. EV289 has a very light spring. Compared to the EV298 having a stiffer spring. Not only that but the pintle to orifice ratios are different. Tho EV298 has a smaller orifice, the plunger/pintle circumference is quite smaller than the orifice, therefore it flows more.

EV289
170560


EV297/298
170561
 

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I have a 2013 3.5 F150. I went to the dealership and asked for the most updated pcv valve for my truck per tsb... They gave me a black ev289 part # BL3Z 6A666 AA. I am not tuned, nor catch can. I do have the weep hole drilled. Is this the pcv I should be using?
 

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IDK. I thought the updated one for gen 1 engines was brown.
 

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So why did the dealership give me the wrong one, when I specifically stated I wanted the latest one per the tsb.... omg Ive about had it with this damn truck....problem after problem
 

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The dealership gave you the standard pcv valve for the truck. They most likely had no idea there was an updated pcv from a TSB since the TSB came out years ago.

The EV289 valve was never superseded so most dealerships are just provided what shows up via the VIN. I would just get the updated valve from the parts department.

KR3Z-6A666-A
 

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There seems to be a shortage of the EV297 valves at most online places. EV289 is plentiful.

Does brown mean the same flow regardless of the part number or application? For example EV281 looks like it would physically fit and is brown. But its applications are the NA 4.6 5.4 and 5.0 V8s
 
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